Navigation Links
Study gives new perspective on agricultural plastic, debris burning, and air quality
Date:7/24/2014

RIVERSIDE, Calif. -- To reduce fire hazard in the United States, wildland managers often utilize the silvicultural practice of mechanically cutting woody shrubs and suppressed trees (ladder fuels). These cuttings and other post-logging debris are then burned during periods of low fire danger in order to dispose of the material. To improve the burning and minimize hazardous air pollutants, managers often cover all or part of the debris pile with low-density polyethylene plastic, commonly referred to as agricultural plastic, in order to keep water out. A recent study published in the Journal of the Air and Water Association shows that inclusion of agricultural plastic in debris piles has no effect on smoke emissions.

Co-author Dr. David Weise, research forester from the U.S. Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station at Riverside, Calif., designed and conducted this study with a team of scientists from the University of California Riverside College of Engineering to examine if agricultural plastic covers affect smoke emissions from burning piles thus having an additional impact on air quality beyond that of wood smoke.

The controlled laboratory study simulated debris piles that contained agricultural plastic in varying amounts to see if they could detect an effect. Burning conditions were optimal because the wood was very dry which encouraged good burning. The scientists added up to 25 times the amount of agricultural plastic found in normal piles and used state of the art real-time instruments to measure the gaseous and particulate emissions. After analyzing the measurements, they did not detect differences in the emissions for the vast majority of compounds they measured.

Based on the results of this and previous studies and literature reviews, including the small amount of agricultural plastic in silvicultural debris piles as is currently practiced does not appear to affect the emissions produced under optimal burning conditions. "This study supports the hypothesis put forth a decade ago that burning agricultural plastic in debris piles would not add significantly to the emissions from a debris pile. We still need to conduct experiments to determine if there is an improvement in burning efficiency beyond simply keeping the piles dry." Dr. Weise said.

This research provides a key piece of information for wildland managers using on site burning to dispose of accumulated forest debris in a safe manner under favorable conditions with limited impact on air quality, visibility and human health.


'/>"/>
Contact: Walita Kay Williams
walitakwilliams@fs.fed.us
510-559-6367
USDA Forest Service - Pacific Southwest Research Station
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. Rutgers study explores attitudes, preferences toward post-Sandy rebuilding
2. Studying impacts of indoor air pollution on tribal communities
3. Genetic study shows major impact of climate change on Antarctic fur seals
4. UI study finds potential genetic link between epilepsy and neurodegenerative disorders
5. New study reveals vulnerability of sharks as collateral damage in commercial fishing
6. Vanderbilt study shows therapeutic bacteria prevent obesity in mice
7. Study compares cost-effectiveness of weight-loss programs and drugs
8. Natural-terrain schoolyards reduce childrens stress, says Colorado University-Boulder study
9. Meerkats sinister side is secret to their success, study shows
10. Studying estrogens made by the brain may offer new insights in learning and memory
11. Study provides insights into birds migration routes
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Study gives new perspective on agricultural plastic, debris burning, and air quality
(Date:4/4/2017)...   EyeLock LLC , a leader of iris-based ... Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) has issued U.S. Patent ... an iris image with a face image acquired in ... 45 th issued patent. "The ... the multi-modal biometric capabilities that have recently come to ...
(Date:3/30/2017)... KONG , March 30, 2017 The ... a system for three-dimensional (3D) fingerprint identification by adopting ground breaking ... into a new realm of speed and accuracy for use in ... at an affordable cost. ... ...
(Date:3/28/2017)... , March 28, 2017 The ... Hardware (Camera, Monitors, Servers, Storage Devices), Software (Video Analytics, ... Region - Global Forecast to 2022", published by MarketsandMarkets, ... 2016 and is projected to reach USD 75.64 Billion ... and 2022. The base year considered for the study ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:5/23/2017)... ... May 23, 2017 , ... ... month its 20th anniversary, marking the occasion with a strong presence at Bio-IT ... Welcome Reception and further extends an invitation to all attendees to view ...
(Date:5/23/2017)... ... , ... Vortex Biosciences , provider of circulating tumor cell (CTC) capture ... using Vortex microfluidic technology ” in Nature Precision Oncology on May 8th. The ... and Dr. Matthew Rettig at the University of California, Los Angeles. The publication describes ...
(Date:5/23/2017)... ... ... Bacterial biofilms, surface adherent communities of bacteria that are encased in a ... and catheter infections to gum disease and the rejection of medical implants. Though ... year, there is currently a paucity of means for preventing their formation or treating ...
(Date:5/22/2017)... ... May 22, 2017 , ... Stratevi, a boutique firm that partners ... Coast. It has opened an office in downtown Boston at 745 Atlantic Ave. ... more important to generate evidence on the value they provide, not just to patients, ...
Breaking Biology Technology: