Navigation Links
Study finds possible alternative to bariatric weight loss surgery
Date:4/30/2013

CINCINNATI An experimental procedure successfully tested in obese laboratory rats may provide a less-invasive alternative to bariatric weight-loss surgery, researchers report online in Endocrinology.

Scientists at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center used a catheter to re-direct the flow of bile from the bile duct into the small intestine, producing the same metabolic and weight-loss benefits as bariatric surgeries such as gastric by-pass. They named the procedure bile diversion, or BD.

"This may lead to novel ways to treat obesity related conditions," said lead investigator, Rohit Kohli, MBBS, MS, a physician and researcher in the Division of Gastroenterology at Cincinnati Children's. "Our results provide compelling evidence that manipulation of bile acids is sufficient to recreate the key effects of bariatric procedures, including gastric bypass, and may be especially beneficial to people with obesity related liver dysfunction."

Bariatric surgery has become an important therapeutic option for morbid obesity and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Gastric bypass surgery is associated with sustained weight loss and reduced overall mortality in patients. Still, the invasive procedure which involves altering the gastrointestinal anatomy of patients also comes with medical risks.

Physicians also do not fully understand the biological mechanisms that produce the post-surgical benefits of procedures like gastric bypass. It is theorized that elevated levels of bile acids detected in the blood of patients trigger molecular processes that may help improve metabolism and energy expenditure.

In the current study, Kohli and his collaborators which included researchers at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine worked from the hypothesis that diverting bile acid in obese rats would recreate the benefits of bariatric surgery.

Male rats with diet-induced obesity received either the bile diversion procedure or a sham surgery in which the bile duct was dissected. A third group of animals did not undergo surgery and were also used as an experimental control group. Researchers then compared the metabolic effects of bile diversion, sham surgery and no surgery for five weeks as rats in all three groups were fed high-fat diets.

Rats undergoing bile diversion had elevated levels of bile acids in their blood and exhibited increased weight loss, reduced fat mass, improved glucose tolerance and reduced liver fat. These characteristics were not observed in the sham or "no surgery" groups.

Kohli said the researchers will use their findings to further explore how bile diversion and increased bile acids in the blood drive molecular signaling pathways leading to metabolic improvement and weight loss. While emphasizing that extensive additional research is still required, Kohli added an eventual goal is to develop therapeutic agents that can produce the same benefits as bariatric surgery without patients having to go through surgical procedures that alter intestinal anatomy.


'/>"/>

Contact: Nick Miller
nicholas.miller@cchmc.org
513-803-6035
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Study by UC Santa Barbara researchers suggests that bacteria communicate by touch
2. Law that regulates shark fishery is too liberal: UBC study
3. New study will help protect vulnerable birds from impacts of climate change
4. Study jointly led by UCSB researcher supports theory of extraterrestrial impact
5. BYU study: Using a gun in bear encounters doesnt make you safer
6. 15-year study: When it comes to creating wetlands, Mother Nature is in charge
7. Pycnogenol (French maritime pine bark extract) shown to improve menopause symptoms in new study
8. Crystal structure of archael chromatin clarified in new study
9. EU-funded study underlines importance of Congo Basin for global climate and biodiversity
10. University of Houston study shows BP oil spill hurt marshes, but recovery possible
11. Study demonstrates cells can acquire new functions through transcriptional regulatory network
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/11/2017)... 11, 2017 No two people are ... the New York University Tandon School of Engineering ... found that partial similarities between prints are common ... mobile phones and other electronic devices can be ... vulnerability lies in the fact that fingerprint-based authentication ...
(Date:4/5/2017)... -- Today HYPR Corp. , leading innovator in ... the HYPR platform is officially FIDO® Certified . ... that empowers biometric authentication across Fortune 500 enterprises and ... 15 million users across the financial services industry, however ... suites and physical access represent a growing portion of ...
(Date:3/30/2017)... 30, 2017  On April 6-7, 2017, Sequencing.com will ... hackathon at Microsoft,s headquarters in ... focus on developing health and wellness apps that provide ... the Genome is the first hackathon for personal ... largest companies in the genomics, tech and health industries ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/12/2017)... Irvine, ca (PRWEB) , ... October 12, 2017 ... ... for the Surgical Wound Market with the addition of its newest module, US ... the $1.2B market for thrombin hemostats, absorbable hemostats, fibrin sealants, synthetic sealants and ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... ... October 11, 2017 , ... The CRISPR-Cas9 ... enabling overexpression experiments and avoiding the use of exogenous expression plasmids. The simplicity ... for performing systematic gain-of-function studies. , This complement to loss-of-function studies, such ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... 2017  VMS BioMarketing, a leading provider of patient support ... Nurse Educator (CNE) network, which will launch this week. The ... health care professionals to enhance the patient care experience by ... other health care professionals to help women who have been ... ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... ... 11, 2017 , ... Singh Biotechnology today announced that the ... its novel anti-STAT3 (Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3) B VHH13 single ... the cell membrane and bind intracellular STAT3 and inhibit its function. Dysregulation of ...
Breaking Biology Technology: