Navigation Links
Study finds Catalina Island Conservancy contraception program effectively manages bison population
Date:12/18/2013

AVALON, CA -- The wild bison roaming Catalina Island are a major attraction for the nearly 1 million tourists who visit the Channel Island's most popular destination every year. But managing the number of bison so that the herd remains healthy and doesn't endanger the health of the rest of the Island has been a major challenge for wildlife biologists.

A new study by the Catalina Island Conservancy scientists, published in the December supplement of the Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine, reports that the Conservancy's contraception program proved effective in managing the herd's numbers. Previously, more than two-thirds of the cows delivered calves every year. After receiving the contraceptive, the calving rate dropped to 10.4% in the first year and 3.3% the following year.

The Conservancy's study demonstrated for the first time that this type of contraceptive will work in a wild herd, a finding that can help improve bison management programs throughout the United States.

"The success of the Catalina Island Conservancy's bison contraception program demonstrates the innovative approaches our scientists undertake in fulfilling our commitment to being responsible stewards of the land and the Island's resources," said Ann Muscat, Catalina Island Conservancy president and chief executive officer. "By proving the effectiveness of this humane approach to herd management, this research will be a benefit to bison herds throughout the U.S. It also lays the groundwork for further contraceptive studies in other wild species."

The bison were first brought to the Island in 1924 for a movie. Over the years, they became an iconic symbol of the Island's culture. But with no natural predators, the herd grew to some 600 animals. The Catalina Island Conservancy, which protects 88% of Catalina Island, had previously conducted studies that found the Island could support only about 150 to 200 bison. To control the herd's size, the Conservancy had been periodically conducting roundups and shipping bison to the mainland.

"Shipping the bison to the mainland was costly, and it raised concerns about the stress on the animals during shipment and the expansion of the herd beyond ecologically sustainable numbers between shipments," said Julie King, director of conservation and wildlife management and a co-author of the contraception study. "We launched the contraceptive program because it is a humane and cost-effective solution to managing the herd and protecting the Island's resources."

Beginning in 2009, the Conservancy's scientists injected the female bison with porcine zona pellucida (PZP), a contraceptive that had been used for fertility control in zoos, wild horses and white tail deer. In addition to substantially reducing the number of new calves, the PZP had no apparent effect on pregnant females or their offspring. The Conservancy's scientists continue to study PZP to determine if the female bison can regain their fertility after a period of time without the contraceptive.

"The bison contraception program is a good example of trying to reach a balance with cultural, aesthetic or recreational needs and uses and cost-effective natural resource management to maintain the health of the ecosystem," said John J. Mack, chief conservation and education officer. "Because humans have been living and changing the Island for thousands of years, the Conservancy is always seeking new approaches to ensuring the long-term use and ecological health of Catalina Island."


'/>"/>

Contact: Patricia J. Maxwell
pmaxwell@catalinaconservancy.org
562-437-8555 x230
Santa Catalina Island Conservancy
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. Study led by NUS scientists provides new insights into cause of human neurodegenerative disease
2. Physicians awarded $4 million to study effects of fertility treatments and obstetric care
3. Study: Moderate alcohol consumption boosts bodys immune system
4. TV ads nutritionally unhealthy for kids, study finds
5. Study finds piece-by-piece approach to emissions policies can be effective
6. Climate change will endanger caribou habitat, study says
7. Pitt study: Lung lesions of TB variable, independent whether infection is active or latent
8. Pathogen study explores blocking effect of E. coli O157:H7 protein
9. Study breaks blood-brain barriers to understanding Alzheimers
10. Disease, not climate change, fueling frog declines in the Andes, study finds
11. With new study, aquatic comb jelly floats into new evolutionary position
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Study finds Catalina Island Conservancy contraception program effectively manages bison population
(Date:3/30/2017)... March 30, 2017  On April 6-7, 2017, Sequencing.com ... Genome hackathon at Microsoft,s headquarters in ... will focus on developing health and wellness apps that ... Hack the Genome is the first hackathon for ... world,s largest companies in the genomics, tech and health ...
(Date:3/28/2017)... , March 28, 2017 The ... Hardware (Camera, Monitors, Servers, Storage Devices), Software (Video Analytics, ... Region - Global Forecast to 2022", published by MarketsandMarkets, ... 2016 and is projected to reach USD 75.64 Billion ... and 2022. The base year considered for the study ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... The report "Gesture Recognition and Touchless Sensing Market by Technology (Touch-based and ... 2022", published by MarketsandMarkets, the market is expected to be worth USD 18.98 ... Continue Reading ... ...      ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:4/21/2017)... , ... April 21, 2017 , ... Having worked on ... year, Formaspace is pleased to introduce it to top lab design architects from around ... Jeff Turk and VP of Industrial Design and Engineering Greg Casey will be at ...
(Date:4/21/2017)... ... April 21, 2017 , ... Frederick Innovative ... range of emerging technology-based businesses, recently earned a $77,518 grant from the Rural ... Founded in 2004, FITCI is Frederick’s first incubator. A non-profit corporation, FITCI is ...
(Date:4/20/2017)... ... April 20, 2017 , ... Husson ... clinical research community’s growing body of knowledge during its Eighth Annual Research ... and the adjacent Darling Atrium. During the event, undergraduates, graduate students, and faculty ...
(Date:4/20/2017)... Bethesda, MD (PRWEB) , ... April 20, 2017 ... ... announce the formation of a unique intellectual property (IP) sharing and commercialization model. ... their most promising inventions. A main component of this effort is bringing the ...
Breaking Biology Technology: