Navigation Links
Study compares sound from exploding volcanoes with jet engines
Date:4/8/2009

New research on infrasound from volcanic eruptions shows an unexpected connection with jet engines. Researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego speeded up the recorded sounds from two volcanoes and uncovered a noise very similar to typical jet engines. These new research findings provide scientists with a more useful probe of the inner workings of volcanic eruptions. Infrasound is sound that is lower in frequency than 20 cycles per second, below the limit of human hearing.

The study led by Robin Matoza, a graduate student at Scripps Oceanography, will be published in an upcoming issue of the journal Geophysical Research Letters, a publication of the American Geophysical Union (AGU). Matoza measured infrasonic sound from Mount St. Helens in Washington State and Tungurahua volcano in Ecuador, both of which are highly active volcanoes close to large population centers.

"We hypothesized that these very large natural volcanic jets were making very low frequency jet noise," said Matoza, who conducts research in the Scripps Laboratory for Atmospheric Acoustics.

Using 100-meter aperture arrays of microbarometers, similar to weather barometers but sensitive to smaller changes in atmospheric pressure and low-frequency infrasonic microphones, the research team tested the hypothesis, revealing the physics of how the large-amplitude signals from eruptions are produced. Jet noise is generated by the turbulent flow of air out of a jet engine. Matoza and colleagues recorded these very large-amplitude infrasonic signals during the times when ash-laden gas was being ejected from the volcano. The study concluded that these large-scale volcanic jets are producing sound in a similar way to smaller-scale man-made jets.

"We can draw on this area of research to speed up our own study of volcanoes for both basic research interests, to provide a deeper understanding of eruptions, and for practical purposes, to determine which eruptions are likely ash-free and therefore less of a threat and which are loaded with ash," said Michael Hedlin, director of Scripps' Atmospheric Acoustics Lab and a co-author on the paper.

Large-amplitude infrasonic signals from volcanic eruptions are currently used in a prototype real-time warning system that informs the Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC) when large infrasonic signals have come from erupting volcanoes. Researchers hope this new information can improve hazard mitigation and inform pilots and the aviation industry.

"The more quantitative we can get about how the sound is produced the more information we can provide to the VAAC," said Matoza. "Eventually it could be possible to provide detailed information such as the size or flow rate of the volcanic jet to put into ash-dispersal forecasting models."


'/>"/>

Contact: Annie Reisewitz or Robert Monroe
scrippsnews@ucsd.edu
858-534-3624
University of California - San Diego
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. UIC biologists use DNA to study migration of threatened whale sharks
2. Study reveals potential to amass more carbon in eastern North American forests
3. Ambati study published in PNAS
4. The fragility of the worlds coral is revealed through a study of the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands
5. UBC study first to show evolutions impact on ecosystems
6. Study: Health undervalued in reproductive rights debate
7. Health choices predict cancer survival, U-M study finds
8. Taste, odor intervention improves cancer therapy, according to Virginia Tech, Wake Forest study
9. UW-Madison study reveals new options for people with PKU
10. Brain building: Study shows brain growth tied to cell division in mouse embryos
11. Skin cancer study uncovers new tumor suppressor gene
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Study compares sound from exploding volcanoes with jet engines
(Date:2/13/2017)...  RSA Conference -- RSA, a Dell Technologies business, ... enhance fraud detection and investigation across digital environments ... & Risk Intelligence Suite. The new platform is ... from internal and external sources as well as ... from targeted cybercrime attacks. "Fraudsters are ...
(Date:2/8/2017)... About Voice Recognition Biometrics Voice recognition biometrics ... a stored voiceprint template. Acoustic features of an ... are compared to distinguish between individual voices. Voice ... PCs already have a microphone and can authenticate ... are most likely to be deployed in telephone-based ...
(Date:2/8/2017)... Feb. 7, 2017 Report Highlights ... 2021 from $8.3 billion in 2016 at a compound ... 2021. Report Includes - An overview of the ... trends, with data from 2015 and 2016, and projections ... Segmentation of the market on the basis of product ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:2/17/2017)... IPSWICH, Mass. , Feb. 17, 2017 /PRNewswire/ ... a small tumor had a mutation-conferring resistance to ... treatment. Recently, genomics research has focused on finding ... — or even from circulating tumor DNA in ... identify new oncology therapeutics. Unfortunately, however, ...
(Date:2/16/2017)... ... February 16, 2017 , ... EIT Digital has launched work ... agricultural industry. Pilot studies are about to get under way for the framework, which ... 5G innovations. The concept is expected to be transferred eventually to other industries that ...
(Date:2/16/2017)... and GREENWICH, Conn. , ... investment firm focused on venture growth investments in ... of Josh Richardson , M.D. to Managing ... in biotechnology companies.  He is a board observer ... roles in Longitude,s investments in Aimmune Therapeutics, Akebia ...
(Date:2/16/2017)... Research and Markets has announced the addition ... to their offering. ... The study scope includes ... chassis organisms, synthetic cells, production systems), enabling technologies (DNA ... specialty media) and enabled technologies (biofuels, chemicals, pharmaceuticals, agriculture) ...
Breaking Biology Technology: