Navigation Links
Strictly yeast
Date:3/27/2014

We all know yeasts make beer and bread but their huge contribution to science, including helping us understand the nuts and bolts of life itself, tends to stay out of the spotlight. Over the past few years, through studies carried out on yeast DNA, biologists have begun to learn that something that looks like a simple cog in all living things is actually performing an intricately choreographed dance. In the same way that the Charleston differs from the Waltz, the dance displayed by this cog is faster and uses different steps from other parts of the yeast machinery. What's more, the dancers leave tell-tale footprints behind in their DNA.

The team at National Collection of Yeast Cultures at the Institute of Food Research have made a computer app to spot these footprints, and to decode the footprints in order to learn more about the rhythm of the dance and how the dance partners have come together and moved apart. The 'dancers' in question are the ribosomal RNA genes which give shape to the ribosome, a tiny protein-making machine found in all living cells.

If the ribosome goes wrong the cell dies, so its blueprint is highly protected. Not so protected though that small changes in the DNA, our footprints, don't occur. Biologists often use these changes to map various bits of the tree of life, so it's important to be able to track even the smallest alterations.

With funding from the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, the NCYC team have now achieved this, using huge DNA datasets to uncover the footprints left behind in yeasts.

"Our app is a very strict judge of the dance steps," said bioinformatician Dr Jo Dicks. "The fast tempo of the ribosomal RNA dance lets us detect very close relationships between different yeasts."

"As well as helping biologists around the world to work out the relationships between other species using their unique footprints, in future we hope to use yeasts with beneficial footprints in the biorefining" said Dr Ian Roberts, NCYC curator. The NCYC team work closely with the Biorefinery Centre, also based at the IFR on the Norwich Research Park.

"Our long-term aim is to exploit our new knowledge to brew up better biofuels and chemicals from yeast, and so reduce dependency on oil as we move towards a new green economy," said Dr Roberts.


'/>"/>
Contact: Andrew Chapple
andrew.chapple@ifr.ac.uk
01-603-251-490
Norwich BioScience Institutes
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. FASEB announces 2014 Science Conference: Yeast Chromosome Structure, Replication & Segregation
2. UT Austin engineer converts yeast cells into sweet crude biofuel
3. Special yeast reduce alcohol, improve wine
4. Yeasts lifestyle couples mating with meiosis
5. More efficient production of biofuels from waste with the help of modified yeasts
6. Family trees for yeast cells
7. Yeast we can! New report answers questions on microbiology and beer
8. Yeast protein breaks up amyloid fibrils and disease protein clumps differently
9. The taste and fragrance of orange, vanilla, rose and more — courtesy of bacteria and yeast
10. MARC travel award announced for the 2012 GSA Yeast Genetics and Molecular Biology Meeting
11. Yeast cell reaction to Zoloft suggests alternative cause, drug target for depression
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Strictly yeast
(Date:4/18/2017)... 2017  Socionext Inc., a global expert in SoC-based imaging and ... the M820, which features the company,s hybrid codec technology. A demonstration ... Probe, Inc., will be showcased during the upcoming Medtec Japan at ... the Las Vegas Convention Center April 24-27. ... Click here for an ...
(Date:4/13/2017)... April 13, 2017 UBM,s Advanced Design and ... will feature emerging and evolving technology through its 3D ... will run alongside the expo portion of the event ... and demonstrations focused on trending topics within 3D printing ... and manufacturing event will take place June 13-15, 2017 at ...
(Date:4/11/2017)... 11, 2017 Crossmatch®, a globally-recognized leader ... today announced that it has been awarded a ... Activity (IARPA) to develop next-generation Presentation Attack Detection ... "Innovation has been a driving force within Crossmatch ... allow us to innovate and develop new technologies ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... BioMedGPS announces expanded coverage of ... newest module, US Hemostats & Sealants. , SmartTRAK’s US Market for Hemostats and ... synthetic sealants and biologic sealants used in surgical applications. BioMedGPS estimates the market ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... Wayne. NJ (PRWEB) , ... October 11, 2017 , ... Personal eye wash is a ... rinse one eye at a time. So which eye do you rinse first if a ... you have Plum Duo Eye Wash with its unique dual eye piece. , ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... ... ... Disappearing forests and increased emissions are the main causes of the evolving air ... living in larger cities are affected by air pollution related diseases. , That is ... globally - decided to take action. , “I knew I had to take action ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... Philadelphia, PA (PRWEB) , ... October 10, 2017 ... ... University City Science Center’s FirstHand program has won a US2020 STEM Mentoring Award. ... accept the award for Excellence in Volunteer Experience from US2020. , US2020’s mission ...
Breaking Biology Technology: