Navigation Links
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, January 2014
Date:1/7/2014

To arrange for an interview with a researcher, please contact the Communications staff member identified at the end of each tip. For more information on ORNL and its research and development activities, please refer to one of our media contacts. If you have a general media-related question or comment, you can send it to news@ornl.gov.

HIGHWAYS The road to efficiency . . .

City Traffic Engineer John Van Winkle, who has positioned Chattanooga as a national leader in intelligent transportation and communication technologies, is headlining a seminar scheduled at Oak Ridge National Laboratory Jan. 10. The event will highlight recent successes in Chattanooga and examine how Internet and communications technologies combined with sensors are coming together in increasingly meaningful ways as traffic engineers strive to reduce congestion and increase safety on highways. Jan-Mou Li, organizer of the seminar and a member of ORNL's Vehicle Systems Research Group, will also discuss potential partnerships with Chattanooga and his recent work related to fuel economy with connected vehicle technology, traffic simulation and the electrification of the nation's highways. [Contact: Ron Walli, (865) 576-0226; wallira@ornl.gov]

ENERGY Challenge Homes gaining steam . . .</p>

Since 2008, more than 1,000 Zero Energy Ready Homes have been built, saving owners millions of dollars in utility bills while increasing comfort, health and durability. From Vermont to Washington, buyers have done the math and know their monthly utility bill savings easily exceed the additional monthly mortgage cost for a high-performance home. And, through the Department of Energy's Challenge Home program, which targets 40 percent minimum energy savings, an ever-increasing number of builders are committing to construct Zero Energy Ready Homes. DOE chief architect Sam Rashkin, builders and homeowners around the country invite journalists to tour these houses, which Rashkin believes are the future of housing. [Contact: Ron Walli, (865) 576-0226; wallira@ornl.gov]

ENVIRONMENT Nano soil science . . .

Cross-disciplinary research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is yielding new insight into the carbon cycle, contaminated soils and soil fertility. An ORNL team is using a novel combination of neutron reflectometry experiments and supercomputer simulations to provide a detailed view of the interactions between organic matter and minerals in soil. The research suggests that relationships among these compounds are governed by simpler principles than previously thought. "It changes the whole way we think about how carbon, nutrients and contaminants interact with soils, which therefore affects fertility, water quality, and the terrestrial carbon cycle," said ORNL's Loukas Petridis. "We don't understand these topics very well because until now we haven't had the techniques capable of getting data at this resolution." The researchers' study is published in Environmental Science and Technology. [Contact: Morgan McCorkle, (865) 574-7308; mccorklelm@ornl.gov]


'/>"/>

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Story tips From the Department of Energys Oak Ridge National Laboratory, March 2012
2. April 2012 story tips
3. Scientists trace evolutionary history of what mammals eat
4. Family history of liver cancer increases risk of developing the disease
5. Earth history and evolution
6. New coelacanth find rewrites history of the ancient fish
7. Biology professor secures grant to save West Virginias primary natural history collection
8. Honoring the fundamental role of microbes in the natural history of our planet
9. New report puts real numbers behind history of oyster reefs
10. IU role in Human Microbiome Project exposes battle history between bacteria, viruses in human body
11. Short stretches of piRNA evaluate cells genetic history
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:12/22/2016)... SuperCom (NASDAQ:   SPCB ... e-Government, Public Safety, HealthCare, and Finance sectors announced today that Leaders ... to implement and deploy a community-based supportive services program to reduce ... , further expanding its presence in the state. ... This new program, which is expected ...
(Date:12/16/2016)... DUBLIN , Dec 16, 2016 Research ... Access System Market - Global Forecast to 2021" report to ... ... projected to grow at a CAGR of 14.06% from 2016 to ... 2016, and is projected to reach 854.8 Million by 2021. The ...
(Date:12/15/2016)... 2016 Advancements in biometrics will ... and wellbeing (HWW), and security of vehicles ... passenger vehicles begin to feature fingerprint recognition, ... beat monitoring, brain wave monitoring, stress detection, ... pulse detection. These will be driven by ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:1/19/2017)... Jan 19, 2017 Research and Markets ... has announced the addition of the ... - Forecast to 2025" report to their offering. ... The report provides a detailed analysis on current and future market ... 2025, using estimated market values as the base numbers ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... AquaBounty Technologies, Inc. (AIM: ABTU; NASDAQ: AQB), ... and a majority-owned subsidiary of Intrexon Corporation (NYSE: ... listing of its common shares on the NASDAQ Stock ... "AquaBounty,s listing on NASDAQ represents an important milestone ... the U.S. markets as we advance plans for commercial ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... NEW YORK , Jan. 18, 2017 /PRNewswire/ ... expected to reach USD 92.9 billion by 2025, ... Research, Inc. Pharmaceutical industry has been adaptive of ... functions as early as 2002. Among the services ... the forerunners. For instance, Johnson & Johnson was ...
(Date:1/18/2017)... , January 18, 2017 According to a new market ... Neuroscience, Cytology, Infectious Disease), & End User (Molecular Diagnostic Laboratories, Academic and Research ... to reach USD 739.9 Million by 2021 from USD 557.1 Million in 2016, ... ... MarketsandMarkets Logo ...
Breaking Biology Technology: