Navigation Links
Stillbirth gap closing between indigenous and non-indigenous women, shows Australian study

The gap in stillbirth rates between indigenous and non-indigenous women in Queensland, Australia, is closing, however indigenous women are still at risk of stillbirth due to preventable causes, find researchers in a new study published today (3 September) in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (BJOG).

The Australian study used data from the Queensland Perinatal Data Collection and looked at 881,211 singleton births from 1995 to 2011. It aimed to assess the differences in stillbirth rates over time among indigenous (Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander) and non-indigenous women based on their location and gestational age.

Of the total number of births, 49,450 (5.6%) were to indigenous women and 831,761 (94.4%) were to non-indigenous women. There were 5,425 stillbirths overall.

The paper found that over the study period, the stillbirth rate for all women in Queensland was 6.2 per 1000 pregnancies. They found that indigenous stillbirth rates decreased 31.9% from 13.3 to 9.1 per 1000 pregnancies while for non-indigenous women the rate was steady around 5.9 per 1000 pregnancies.

Overall, the difference in stillbirth rates between indigenous and non-indigenous women reduced by 57.3%. Moreover, indigenous women living in regional and remote areas experienced greater reductions than women in urban areas.

The researchers looked specifically at geographical location and found that stillbirth rates among indigenous women decreased by 10.2%, 29.2% and 49.9% for women living in urban, regional and remote areas respectively. In comparison, the stillbirth rates for non-indigenous women increased by 0.9% and 11.4% for women living in urban and regional areas and decreased by 39.2% for those in remote areas.

Looking at gestational age, the study found that among indigenous women stillbirth rates decreased the most, 69.1%, for births between 28 and 36 weeks gestation. Among non-indigenous women, there was an increase in stillbirth rates of 36.3% before 24 weeks gestation and decreases in the weeks following that. Overall, the difference in stillbirth rates reduced between indigenous and non-indigenous women for all gestational ages except for more than 37 weeks, where the difference increased by 18%.

At term (over 37 weeks) the researchers found that indigenous women had an increased risk of stillbirth due to maternal conditions and perinatal infection. For example, indigenous women had a six-fold increased risk of stillbirth due to diabetes, a three-fold increased risk of stillbirth due to spontaneous preterm birth and an increased risk of stillbirth due to hypertension, fetal growth restriction and antepartum haemorrhage.

Ibinabo Ibiebele, is the co-author of the study and a PhD student working with the Mater Research Institute and the School of Population Health at the University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. She said:

"This study shows that the gap in stillbirth rates is narrowing between indigenous and non-indigenous women except at term where we identified a number of preventable conditions such as diabetes, infection and fetal growth restriction.

"With the appropriate help and interventions there is an opportunity to further reduce the number of term stillbirths among indigenous women.

"It is vital that there is high quality antenatal care at all levels available for indigenous women which is culturally sensitive and incorporates diabetes management, smoking cessation, STI screening and folic acid supplementation to improve pregnancy outcomes."

John Thorp, BJOG deputy editor-in-chief said:

"This is a very interesting study as it looks at a large number of women over a long time period.

"Stillbirth is devastating for families and it is encouraging to see the gap in rates is closing between indigenous and non-indigenous women. This study furthers our knowledge as it looks at some of the trends and underlying causes of stillbirths."

Contact: Nicole Weingartner

Related biology news :

1. Scientists closing in on new obesity drug
2. Aware Announces Closing Of Sale Of Selected Patents
3. War between bacteria and phages benefits humans
4. Scientists find possible neurobiological basis for tradeoff between honesty, self-interest
5. Quality of US diet improves, gap widens for quality between rich and poor
6. A touching story: The ancient conversation between plants, fungi and bacteria
7. Study calls into question link between prenatal antidepressant exposure and autism risk
8. UMN and NYBC research finds potential MERS transmission mechanism between bats and humans
9. Mapping the optimal route between two quantum states
10. New study draws links between wildlife loss and social conflicts
11. UI study finds potential genetic link between epilepsy and neurodegenerative disorders
Post Your Comments:
(Date:11/12/2015)... , Nov. 11, 2015   Growing need ... analytical tools has been paving the way for ... determination of discrete analytes in clinical, agricultural, environmental, ... being predominantly used in medical applications, however, their ... sectors due to continuous emphasis on improving product ...
(Date:11/10/2015)... , Nov. 10, 2015 ... behavioral biometrics that helps to identify and verify ... Signature is considered as the secure and accurate ... identification of a particular individual because each individual,s ... accurate results especially when dynamic signature of an ...
(Date:11/4/2015)... , November 4, 2015 ... new market report published by Transparency Market Research "Home Security ... Trends and Forecast 2015 - 2022", the global home security ... 30.3 bn by 2022. The market is estimated to ... period from 2015 to 2022. Rising security needs among ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... ... The United States Golf Association (USGA) today announced Dr. Bruce Clarke, of ... since 1961, the USGA Green Section Award recognizes an individual’s distinguished service to the ... of Iselin, N.J., is an extension specialist of turfgrass pathology in the department of ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... November 24, 2015 , ... International Society for Pharmaceutical Engineering ... premier annual events for pharmaceutical manufacturing: 2015 Annual Meeting. The conference took place ... the largest number of attendees in more than a decade. , “The ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... (PRWEB) , ... November 24, 2015 , ... The Academy ... Special Interest Group (SIG), MultiGP, also known as Multirotor Grand Prix, to represent the ... last few years. Many AMA members have embraced this type of racing and several ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... 24, 2015  Twist Bioscience, a company focused ... Ph.D., Twist Bioscience chief executive officer, will present ... December 1, 2015 at 3:10 p.m. Eastern Time at The ... --> --> ... Bioscience is on Twitter. Sign up to follow ...
Breaking Biology Technology: