Navigation Links
Stem cell research helps to identify origins of schizophrenia
Date:1/22/2013

BUFFALO, N.Y. New University at Buffalo research demonstrates how defects in an important neurological pathway in early development may be responsible for the onset of schizophrenia later in life.

The UB findings, published in Schizophrenia Research (paper at http://bit.ly/Wq1i41), test the hypothesis in a new mouse model of schizophrenia that demonstrates how gestational brain changes cause behavioral problems later in life just like the human disease.

Partial funding for the research came from New York Stem Cell Science (NYSTEM).

The genomic pathway, called the Integrative Nuclear FGFR 1 Signaling (INFS), is a central intersection point for multiple pathways of as many as 160 different genes believed to be involved in the disorder.

"We believe this is the first model that explains schizophrenia from genes to development to brain structure and finally to behavior," says lead author Michal Stachowiak, PhD, professor in the Department of Pathology and Anatomical Sciences in the UB School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. He also is director of the Stem Cell Engraftment & In Vivo Analysis Facility at the Western New York Stem Cell Culture and Analysis Center at UB.

A key challenge with the disease is that patients with schizophrenia exhibit mutations in different genes, he says.

"How is it possible to have 100 patients with schizophrenia and each one has a different genetic mutation that causes the disorder?" asks Stachowiak. "It's possible because INFS integrates diverse neurological signals that control the development of embryonic stem cell and neural progenitor cells, and links pathways involving schizophrenia-linked genes.

"INFS functions like the conductor of an orchestra," explains Stachowiak. "It doesn't matter which musician is playing the wrong note, it brings down the conductor and the whole orchestra. With INFS, we propose that when there is an alteration or mutation in a single schizophrenia-linked gene, the INFS system that controls development of the whole brain becomes untuned. That's how schizophrenia develops."

Using embryonic stem cells, Stachowiak and colleagues at UB and other institutions found that some of the genes implicated in schizophrenia bind the FGFR1 (fibroblast growth factor receptor) protein, which in turn, has a cascading effect on the entire INFS.

"We believe that FGFR1 is the conductor that physically interacts with all genes that affect schizophrenia," he says. "We think that schizophrenia occurs when there is a malfunction in the transition from stem cell to neuron, particularly with dopamine neurons."

The researchers tested their hypothesis by creating an FGFR1 mutation in mice, which produced the hallmarks of the human disease: altered brain anatomy, behavioral impacts and overloaded sensory processes.

"By attacking the INFS pathway, we were able to produce schizophrenia in mice," he says.

He adds that if such a generalized genomic pathway is causing the disease, then it should be possible to treat the disease with a more generalized approach. "We may even be able to devise ways to arrest development of the disease before it presents fully in adolescence or adulthood," he says.

The UB work adds to existing evidence that nicotinic agonists, often prescribed as smoking cessation drugs, could help improve cognitive function in schizophrenics by acting on the INFS. Schizophrenics smoke at a dramatically higher rate than the general population, long believed to be a form of self-medication.


'/>"/>

Contact: Ellen Goldbaum
goldbaum@buffalo.edu
716-645-4605
University at Buffalo
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. UT Dallas researchers awarded $4.3 million to create next-generation technologies
2. Vitamin D holds promise in battling a deadly breast cancer, Saint Louis University researchers say
3. Men more likely to commit research misconduct than female counterparts
4. Researchers analyse rock dissolving method of geoengineering
5. Researchers show how cells DNA repair machinery can destroy viruses
6. Researchers turn one form of neuron into another in the brain
7. UGA researchers invent new material for warm-white LEDs
8. NSF Supports GlobalNSF supports global research to advance science and engineering for sustainability
9. RUB researchers find over active enzyme in failing hearts
10. New research throws doubt on earlier killer walrus claims
11. Researchers attack HIVs final defenses before drug-resistant mutations emerge
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Stem cell research helps to identify origins of schizophrenia
(Date:4/11/2017)... Research and Markets has announced the addition of the ... ... grow at a CAGR of 30.37% during the period 2017-2021. ... prepared based on an in-depth market analysis with inputs from industry ... over the coming years. The report also includes a discussion of ...
(Date:4/11/2017)... 2017 NXT-ID, Inc. (NASDAQ:   NXTD ... the appointment of independent Directors Mr. Robin D. Richards ... of Directors, furthering the company,s corporate governance and expertise. ... Gino Pereira , Chief ... to their guidance and benefiting from their considerable expertise as ...
(Date:4/5/2017)... April 5, 2017  The Allen Institute for Cell ... Explorer: a one-of-a-kind portal and dynamic digital window into ... data, the first application of deep learning to create ... cell lines and a growing suite of powerful tools. ... these and future publicly available resources created and shared ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/11/2017)... ... October 11, 2017 , ... ... granted orphan drug designation to SBT-100, its novel anti-STAT3 (Signal Transducer and Activator ... osteosarcoma. SBT-100 is able to cross the cell membrane and bind intracellular STAT3 ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... ... 2017 , ... For the second time in three years, ... Award. Representatives of the FirstHand program travelled to Washington, D.C. Tuesday, October 10th, ... mission is to change the trajectory of STEM education in America by dramatically ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... , Oct. 10, 2017 SomaGenics announced ... the NIH to develop RealSeq®-SC (Single Cell), expected to ... profiling small RNAs (including microRNAs) from single cells using ... highlights the need to accelerate development of approaches to ... "New techniques for measuring levels of ...
(Date:10/9/2017)... 9, 2017  BioTech Holdings announced today identification ... its ProCell stem cell therapy prevents limb loss ... Company, demonstrated that treatment with ProCell resulted in ... as compared to standard bone marrow stem cell ... in reduction of therapeutic effect.  ...
Breaking Biology Technology: