Navigation Links
Stanford scientists help shed light on key component of China's pollution problem
Date:2/26/2013

It's no secret that China is faced with some of the world's worst pollution. Until now, however, information on the magnitude, scope and impacts of a major contributor to that pollution human-caused nitrogen emissions was lacking.

A new study co-authored by Stanford biology professor and Stanford Woods Institute senior fellow Peter Vitousek reveals that amounts of nitrogen (from industry, cars and fertilizer) deposited on land and water in China by way of rain, dust and other carriers increased by 60 percent annually from the 1980s to the 2000s, with profound consequences for the country's people and ecosystems.

Xuejun Liu and Fusuo Zhang at China Agricultural University in Beijing led the study, which is part of an ongoing collaboration with Stanford aimed at reducing agricultural nutrient pollution while increasing food production in China a collaboration that includes Vitousek and Pamela Matson, dean of Stanford's School of Earth Sciences and a Stanford Woods Institute senior fellow.

The researchers analyzed all available data on bulk nitrogen deposition from monitoring sites throughout China from 1980 to 2010.

During the past 30 years, China has become by far the largest creator and emitter of nitrogen globally. The country's use of nitrogen as a fertilizer increased about threefold from the 1980s to 2000s, while livestock numbers and coal combustion increased about fourfold, and the number of automobiles about twentyfold (all of these activities release reactive nitrogen into the environment).

Increased levels of nitrogen have led to a range of deleterious impacts including decreased air quality, acidification of soil and water, increased greenhouse gas concentrations and reduced biological diversity.

"All these changes can be linked to a common driving factor: strong economic growth, which has led to continuous increases in agricultural and non-agricultural reactive nitrogen emissions and consequently increased nitrogen deposition," the study's authors write.

Researchers found highly significant increases in bulk nitrogen deposition since the 1980s in China's industrialized North, Southeast and Southwest. Nitrogen levels on the North China Plain are much higher than those observed in any region in the United States and are comparable to the maximum values observed in the United Kingdom and the Netherlands when nitrogen deposition was at its peak in the 1980s.

China's rapid industrialization and agricultural expansion have led to continuous increases in nitrogen emissions and nitrogen deposition. China's production and use of nitrogen-based fertilizers is greater than that of the United States and the European Union combined. Because of inefficiencies, more than half of that fertilizer is lost to the environment in gaseous or dissolved forms.

China's nitrogen deposition problem could be brought under control, the study's authors state, if the country's environmental policy focused on improving efficiency in agricultural use of nitrogen and reducing nitrogen emissions from all sources, including industry and transit.


'/>"/>
Contact: Peter Vitousek
vitousek@stanford.edu
650-725-1866
Stanford University
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Stanford scientists develop gene therapy approach to grow blood vessels in ischemic limbs
2. Keck award enables Carnegie Mellon and Stanford to dramatically expand crowdsourced RNA design
3. Climate change may create price volatility in the corn market, say Stanford and Purdue researchers
4. Stanford and MIT scientists win Perl-UNC Neuroscience prize
5. Americas clean energy policies need a reality check, say Stanford researchers
6. Support for climate change action drops, Stanford poll finds
7. Stanford scientists document fragile land-sea ecological chain
8. Stanford researchers help predict the oceans of the future with a mini-lab
9. Stanford marine biologist Barbara Block wins Rolex Award for Enterprise
10. Stanford scientists find molecule to starve lung cancer and improve ventilator recovery
11. Stanford researchers calculate global health impacts of the Fukushima nuclear disaster
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/2/2016)... , Feb. 2, 2016 Technology Enhancements Accelerate ... an analysis of the digital and computed radiography markets ... , and Indonesia (TIM). ... and market size, as well as regional market drivers ... and discusses market penetration and market attractiveness, both for ...
(Date:2/2/2016)... Feb. 2, 2016  Based on its recent ... Sullivan recognizes US-based Intelligent Retinal Imaging Systems (IRIS) ... Award for New Product Innovation. IRIS, a prominent ... North America , is poised to set ... diabetic retinopathy market. The IRIS technology presents superior ...
(Date:2/1/2016)... , Feb. 1, 2016  Today, the first day ... announced plans to develop a first of its kind ... of IBM Watson. In the first application of ... (NYSE: IBM ), and Welltok will create a ... assessments with cognitive analytics, delivered on Welltok,s health optimization ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:2/11/2016)... 2016  Wellcentive today announced it has been ... -based community care organization (CCO) with more ... quality reporting and care management solutions and services. ... of quality managers, analysts and care managers while ... serving FamilyCare members. Oregon ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... Florida , February 11, 2016 ... PositiveID Corporation ("PositiveID" or "Company") (OTCQB: PSID), a ... announced today that its Thermomedics subsidiary, which markets ... on its growth plan in January 2016, including ... distributors, increasing sequential monthly sales growth, and establishing ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... ... February 11, 2016 , ... Global Stem ... agreement with Bankok,Thailand-based Global Stem Cells Network (GSCN) to distribute exosome injection and ... countries, including Mexico, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Colombia, Argentina, Nicaragua, Panama, El Salvador, ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... Early-career researchers from Indonesia , ... and Yemen honored ... Indonesia , Nepal , Peru ... are being honored for their accomplishments in nutrition, psychiatry, biotechnology, women,s health, ... scientists who are pursuing careers in agriculture, biology and medicine in their ...
Breaking Biology Technology: