Navigation Links
Specific protein may help neurons fix themselves in Parkinson's patients
Date:7/22/2010

EAST LANSING, Mich. A Michigan State University researcher is working to uncover how a protein known as parkin may help nerve cells fight off damage from Parkinson's disease, a strategy that could lead to new therapies for the degenerative ailment.

John Goudreau, an osteopathic physician and director of MSU's Translational Neurobiology Research Unit, believes parkin can rescue certain neurons from injury induced by Parkinson's disease.

He has been awarded $1.5 million from the National Institutes of Health's National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke to test his hypothesis.

"Parkinson's is a progressive disease, and much of the research has been focused on slowing that progression by preventing cell injury and death," said Goudreau, who holds appointments in MSU's departments of Neurology and Pharmacology/Toxicology in the College of Osteopathic Medicine. "But we are looking at why some neurons in the brain are able to fight off the disease through a unique ability to revive after being hit with an injury that kills other cells."

There is a "selective vulnerability" with Parkinson's disease, he said, where nerve cells in the mid-brain are damaged while cells in the hypothalamic region of the brain are spared since they have the capacity to quickly bounce back after being damaged.

Goudreau's research team has discovered that the protein parkin is essential for these hypothalamic neurons to recover.

"What we now want to find out is how parkin facilitates this recovery," said Goudreau, who has been studying Parkinson's disease for nearly a decade at MSU and has received more than $2 million in external funding for clinical and translational research.

Using human cell cultures and mice, the research team will attempt to isolate exactly what the parkin protein is doing and how it helps neurons return to health after being damaged. Two theories: Parkin may allow cells to rebound from injury by aiding in energy production within the cell, or it may improve a cell's ability to dispose of other proteins damaged by Parkinson's disease.

Either way, Goudreau said, understanding the steps underlying parkin's ability to promote neuron recovery will identify targets for therapies to slow the progression of Parkinson's disease.

"From a clinical standpoint, once a Parkinson's patient presents symptoms and seeks treatment, many neurons in the brain have already been injured and many cells are already dead," he said. "But there is a population of injured neurons that still have the potential to recover.

"Understanding how parkin promotes recovery from injury may allow us to provide cells injured by Parkinson's disease the necessary tools to survive."


'/>"/>

Contact: Jason Cody
codyja@msu.edu
517-432-0924
Michigan State University
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. Study reveals specific gene in adolescent men with delinquent peers
2. The quest for specific anti-inflammatory treatment
3. The genetics of fear: Study suggests specific genetic variations contribute to anxiety disorders
4. Researchers identify specific lung cancer susceptibility gene
5. New tool isolates RNA within specific cells
6. Specific genetic cause of fetal alcohol-related developmental disorders found
7. LSUHSC research helps link schizophrenia to specific DNA region
8. Ben-Gurion University Alzheimers researcher demonstrates specific immune response to vaccine
9. Gene-based stem cell therapy specifically removes cell receptor that attracts HIV
10. Genome mapping technique speeds process of finding specific genes
11. Specific lymph node radiotherapy is well-tolerated after surgery in early breast cancer patients
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Specific protein may help neurons fix themselves in Parkinson's patients
(Date:4/11/2017)... , April 11, 2017 Crossmatch®, ... secure authentication solutions, today announced that it has ... Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) to develop next-generation ... program. "Innovation has been a driving ... Thor program will allow us to innovate and ...
(Date:4/6/2017)... , April 6, 2017 ... RFID, ANPR, Document Readers, by End-Use (Transportation & Logistics, ... Facility, Oil, Gas & Fossil Generation Facility, Nuclear Power), ... Educational, Other) Are you looking for a ... sector? ...
(Date:4/4/2017)... , April 4, 2017   EyeLock LLC , ... that the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) ... covers the linking of an iris image with a ... and represents the company,s 45 th issued patent. ... is very timely given the multi-modal biometric capabilities that ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/11/2017)... ... October 11, 2017 , ... Singh Biotechnology today ... designation to SBT-100, its novel anti-STAT3 (Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3) ... able to cross the cell membrane and bind intracellular STAT3 and inhibit its ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... research firm Parks Associates announced today that Tom Kerber ... Annual Meeting , October 11 in Scottsdale, Arizona . ... how smart safety and security products impact the competitive landscape. ... Parks Associates: Smart Home Devices: Main Purchase Driver ... "The residential security market has experienced continued growth, and the ...
(Date:10/9/2017)... , ... October 09, 2017 , ... The award-winning American ... broadcast first quarter 2018. American Farmer airs Tuesdays at 8:30aET on RFD-TV. , ... faced with the challenge of how to continue to feed a growing nation. At ...
(Date:10/7/2017)... ... October 06, 2017 , ... ... technologies, launched its ProxiMeta™ Hi-C metagenome deconvolution product, featuring the first commercially ... cloud-based bioinformatics software to perform Hi-C metagenome deconvolution using their own facilities, ...
Breaking Biology Technology: