Navigation Links
Smithsonian reports GMO soybean pollen threatens Mexican honey sales
Date:2/7/2014

Mexico is the fourth largest honey producer and fifth largest honey exporter in the world. A Smithsonian researcher and colleagues helped rural farmers in Mexico to quantify the genetically modified organism (GMO) soybean pollen in honey samples rejected for sale in Germany. Their results will appear Feb. 7 in the online journal, Scientific Reports.

David Roubik, senior staff scientist at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, and colleagues developed the ability to identify pollen grains in honey in Panama and in Mexico during the 1980s and 1990s when they studied the effects of the arrival of Africanized bees on native bees. "Nobody else can do this kind of work in the 'big field' environment and be confident that what they are seeing are soybean pollen grains," said Roubik. They found that six honey samples from nine hives in the Campeche region contained soy pollen in addition to pollen from many wild plant species. The pollen came from crops near the bee colonies in several small apiaries.

Due to strict European regulations, rural farmers in the Mexican Yucatan face significant price cuts or outright rejection of their honey crop when their product contains pollen from GMO crops that are not for human consumption. The regional agricultural authorities, furthermore, seemed unaware that bees visited flowering soybeans to collect nectar and pollen.

"As far as we could determine, every kind of GMO soybean grown in Campeche is approved for human consumption," said Roubik. "But honey importers sometimes do no further analysis to match GMO pollen grains with their source."

To test the honey for GMO pollen, researchers from the Smithsonian, El Colegio de la Frontera Sur la Universidad Autonoma de Yucatan and el Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agropecuarias y Pecuarias sent the nine samples to Intertek laboratory in Bremen, Germany, for genetic analysis. Two samples tested positive for GMO pollen.

"We cautiously interpret these results as significant for elsewhere in Mexico where some five times the GMO soy grown in Campeche is found and beekeeping is alive and well, not to mention the rest of the world," said Roubik. "Bee colonies act as extremely sensitive environmental indicators. Bees from a single colony may gather nectar and pollen resources from flowers in a 200-square-kilometer area. With an economy based on subsistence agriculture associated with honey production, the social implications of this shift in the status of honey are likely to be contentious and have profound implications for beekeeping in general."


'/>"/>

Contact: Beth King
kingb@si.edu
202-633-4700 x28216
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Smithsonian launches global marine biodiversity project with $10 million donation
2. Smithsonian scientists honored as AAAS Fellows
3. Smithsonian reports fiery-red coral species discovered in the Peruvian Pacific
4. Aware, Inc. Reports First Quarter 2012 Financial Results
5. Radiologists study necessity of additional imaging recommendations in PET/CT oncologic reports
6. BGI reports the completed sequence of foxtail millet genome
7. GEN reports on growth of tissue engineering revenues
8. Aware, Inc. Reports Second Quarter 2012 Financial Results
9. BGI reports the latest finding on NMNAT1 mutations linked to Leber congenital amaurosis
10. GEN reports on recent progress in Alzheimers research
11. GEN reports on growth of biobanking operations
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/28/2016)... Sweden , April 28, 2016 First ... M (139.9), up 966% compared with the first quarter of 2015 ... profit totaled SEK 589.1 M (loss: 18.8) and the operating margin ... 7.12 (loss: 0.32) Cash flow from operations was SEK ... The 2016 revenue guidance is unchanged, SEK 7,000-8,500 M. ...
(Date:4/15/2016)...  A new partnership announced today will help ... in a fraction of the time it takes ... life insurance policies to consumers without requiring inconvenient ... Diagnostics, rapid testing (A1C, Cotinine and HIV) and ... weight, pulse, BMI, and activity data) available at ...
(Date:3/31/2016)... March 31, 2016   ... or the "Company") LegacyXChange is excited to ... its soon to be launched online site for trading ... ) will also provide potential shareholders a sense ... technology to an industry that is notorious for fraud. ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:4/29/2016)... and San Diego, CA (PRWEB) , ... April 29, 2016 , ... ... Stem Cell Foundation (NSCF) to support the development of a patient-specific stem cell therapy ... Andrés Bratt-Leal in the lab of Dr. Jeanne Loring at The Scripps Research Institute ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... 2016 Q BioMed Inc. ... CEO  was featured in an article he wrote ... Fear To Tread: http://www.lifescienceleader.com/doc/accelerators-enter-when-vcs-fear-to-tread-0001 ... is an essential business journal for life science ... to Big Pharmas. Their content is designed to ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... Windsor, Connecticut (PRWEB) , ... April 28, 2016 ... ... Morris Group, Inc., will hold an open house for regional manufacturers at its ... and displays from Tsugami, Okuma, Hardinge Group, Chiron and Trumpf. Almost 20 ...
(Date:4/27/2016)... ... April 27, 2016 , ... Most consumers engage with biometrics ... for secure access, voice recognition for hands-free communication, and facial recognition to help ... biometrics technology today. But if they asked Joey Pritikin, Vice President of ...
Breaking Biology Technology: