Navigation Links
Slowing evolution to stop drug resistance
Date:11/16/2009

Infectious organisms that become resistant to antibiotics are a serious threat to human society. They are also a natural part of evolution. In a new project, researchers at the University of Gothenburg are attempting to find substances that can slow the pace of evolution, in order to ensure that the drugs of today remain effective into the future.

The resistance of infectious organisms to antibiotics is particularly serious in drugs against fungi. Fungal cells are similar to human cells, which means that it is difficult to develop effective drugs that can destroy them without also damaging human cells, i.e. without causing side effects. We must therefore safeguard the effectiveness of the few antifungal drugs that are available today. Resistance to these would leave many diseases without effective treatment.

A natural phenomenon

However, drug resistance is a natural part of evolution. Evolution creates random variations in the characteristics of organisms, which results in some of them developing greater tolerance to drugs to which they are exposed. This leads eventually to completely resistant fungal strains, and the drug will become totally ineffective. The quicker these random variations appear, the greater the risk of resistance developing. One way of combating drug resistance is to slow down the pace of evolution.

Slowing down evolution

Researcher Jonas Warringer at the Department of Cell and Molecular Biology is using advanced genetic experiments to try to find such "evolution-slowing" substances. In the first instance, this involves identifying the cell components that regulate the speed of evolution. Jonas Warringer and his colleagues are using ordinary brewer's yeast as a model for their studies. A yeast has 6 000 genes, and destroying single genes in otherwise identical organisms enables Jonas Warringer and his colleagues to use the method of exclusion.

Looking for gold dust

"We stimulate the evolution of the yeast cell and observe it in real time. As our yeasts develop resistance to a particular drug, we measure how the survivability of the different strains changes during the process. Evolution progresses more slowly in some strains when a specific component is destroyed. These strains are like gold dust to us, because they tell us that these particular components are critical to the speed of evolution," says Jonas Warringer.

"This is how we eventually found the genes that regulate evolution. If, in the next phase, we can find a substance that can attack one of these components, we will be able to delay the development of drug resistance and ensure that today's drugs remain effective into the future."

The research project is funded by the Magnus Bergwall Foundation and other benefactors. Jonas Warringer hopes that evolution-slowing drugs will become available within the next 10-15 years.


'/>"/>

Contact: Jonas Warringer
jonas.warringer@cmb.gu.se
46-031-786-3961
University of Gothenburg
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. Landscape-scale treatment promising for slowing beetle spread
2. Researchers combat slowing yields with targeted fertilizer applications
3. Biologists, educators recognize excellence in evolution education
4. Study sheds light on evolution of human complexity
5. Evolution of hyperactivity is focus of free public lecture at UC Riverside
6. K-State receives more than $780,000 to fund graduate students studying ecology, evolution, genomics
7. Time in a bottle: Scientists watch evolution unfold
8. Science wins fight over evolution in schools, says Case Western Reserve University author
9. The amazing maze of maize evolution
10. Genetic conflict in fish led to evolution of new sex chromosomes
11. Frozen assets: NIAID researchers turn to unique resource for clues to norovirus evolution
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Slowing evolution to stop drug resistance
(Date:6/2/2016)... , June 2, 2016 The Department ... has awarded the 44 million US Dollar project, for the ... Vehicle Plates including Personalization, Enrolment, and IT Infrastructure , ... in the production and implementation of Identity Management Solutions. Numerous ... however Decatur was selected for the ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... Ampronix facilitates superior patient care by providing unparalleled technology to leaders of ... the latest premium product recently added to the range of products distributed by Ampronix. ... ... ... Medical Display- Ampronix News ...
(Date:5/9/2016)... UAE, May 9, 2016 Elevay ... comes to expanding freedom for high net worth professionals ... in today,s globally connected world, there is still no ... could ever duplicate sealing your deal with a firm ... passports by taking advantage of citizenship via investment programs ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... 2016 Houston Methodist Willowbrook Hospital has ... Association to serve as their official health care ... Willowbrook will provide sponsorship support, athletic training services, ... coaches, volunteers, athletes and families. "We ... Association and to bring Houston Methodist quality services ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... NEW YORK , June, 23, 2016  The ... students to envision new ways to harness living systems ... of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York ... more than 130 participating students, showcased projects at MoMA,s ... included Paola Antonelli , MoMA,s senior curator of ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... OTTAWA, ON (PRWEB) , ... June 23, 2016 , ... ... former DNA Technical Leader at the Arkansas State Crime Laboratory, has joined STACS DNA ... joining the STACS DNA team,” said Jocelyn Tremblay, President and COO of STACS DNA. ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... NEWPORT BEACH, Calif. , June 23, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... offering new biological discoveries to the medical community, has ... and co-founder Matthew Nunez . "We ... provide us with the capital we need to meet ... funding will essentially provide us the runway to complete ...
Breaking Biology Technology: