Navigation Links
Sensitive nanowire disease detectors made by Yale scientists
Date:10/10/2008

New Haven, Conn. Yale scientists have created nanowire sensors coupled with simple microprocessor electronics that are both sensitive and specific enough to be used for point-of-care (POC) disease detection, according to a report in Nano Letters.

The sensors use activation of immune cells by highly specific antigens signatures of bacteria, viruses or cancer cells as the detector. When T cells are activated, they produce acid, and generate a tiny current in the nanowire electronics, signaling the presence of a specific antigen. The system can detect as few as 200 activated cells.

In earlier studies, these researchers demonstrated that the nanowires could detect generalized activation of this small number of T cells. The new report expands that work and shows the nanowires can identify activation from a single specific antigen even when there is substantial background "noise" from a general immune stimulation of other cells.

Describing the sensitivity of the system, senior author Tarek Fahmy, Yale assistant professor of biomedical engineering, said:. "Imagine I am the detector in a room where thousands of unrelated people are talking and I whisper, 'Who knows me?' I am so sensitive that I can hear even a few people saying, 'I do' above the crowd noise. In the past, we could detect everyone talking now we can hear the few above the many."

According to the authors, this level of sensitivity and specificity is unprecedented in a system that uses no dyes or radioactivity. Beyond its sensitivity, they say, the beauty of this detection system is in its speed producing results in seconds and its compatibility with existing CMOS electronics.

"We simply took direction from Mother Nature and used the exquisitely sensitive and flexible detection of the immune system as the detector, and a basic physiological response of immune cells as the reporter," said postdoctoral fellow and lead author, Eric Stern. "We coupled that with existing CMOS electronics to make it easily usable."

The authors see a huge potential for the system in POC diagnostic centers in the US and in underdeveloped countries where healthcare facilities and clinics are lacking. He says it could be as simple as an iPod-like device with changeable cards to detect or diagnose disease. Importantly, Stern notes that the system produces no false positives a necessity for POC testing.

The authors suggest that in a clinic, assays could immediately determine which strain of flu a patient has, whether or not there is an HIV infection, or what strain of tuberculosis or coli bacteria is present. Currently, there are no electronic POC diagnostic devices available for disease detection. "Instruments this sensitive could also play a role in detection of residual disease after antiviral treatments or chemotherapy," said Fahmy. "They will help with one of the greatest challenges we face in treatment of disease knowing if we got rid of all of it."


'/>"/>

Contact: Janet Rettig Emanuel
janet.emanuel@yale.edu
203-432-2157
Yale University
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. For insulin sensitive overweight patients, 1 session of exercise improves metabolic health
2. More sensitive radiology monitoring in the Basque Country
3. Researchers develop new ultrasensitive assay to detect most poisonous substance known
4. New chemically-sensitive MRI scan may bypass some invasive diagnostic tests in next decade
5. Nanowires hold promise for more affordable solar cells
6. Stanfords nanowire battery holds 10 times the charge of existing ones
7. Waterborne disease risk upped in Great Lakes
8. Tracking down the cause of mad cow disease
9. LSUHSC awarded patent for compound inhibiting cancer and other diseases
10. Form of Crohns disease traced to disabled gut cells
11. World leaders in infectious diseases convene to discuss emerging global viruses
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/8/2017)... NEW YORK , Feb. 7, 2017 /PRNewswire/ ... point. Driven largely by the confluence of organizations, ... users, distaste for knowledge-based systems (password and challenge ... consumer, industrial, and government systems. The market is ... been a demarcation between consumer and enterprise uses ...
(Date:2/7/2017)... Feb. 7, 2017 Zimmer Biomet Holdings, Inc. ... healthcare, will present at the LEERINK Partners 6th Annual ... Hotel on Wednesday, February 15, 2017 at 10 a.m. ... the presentation can be accessed at http://wsw.com/webcast/leerink28/zbh .  ... conference via Zimmer Biomet,s Investor Relations website at ...
(Date:2/3/2017)... 3, 2017  Texas Biomedical Research Institute announced that its ... Schlesinger as the Institute,s new President and CEO. Dr. ... 31, 2017. He is currently the Chair of the Department ... for Microbial Interface Biology at Ohio State University. ... President and CEO of Texas Biomed," said Dr. James ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:2/24/2017)... Pa., Feb. 24, 2017  VWR Corporation (NASDAQ: VWR), the ... laboratory and production customers, today reported its financial results for ... Highlights: 4Q16 record quarterly ... 1.0% on an organic basis. ... an organic basis, while the Americas net sales increased 2.5%, ...
(Date:2/23/2017)... ... February 23, 2017 , ... BellBrook Labs is formalizing a ... array of biochemical analyses critical for Lead Discovery. The company’s Lead Discovery ... programs, including inhibitor potency and selectivity, mechanism of action, and inhibitor residence times ...
(Date:2/23/2017)... , Feb. 23, 2017  Seattle,s upscale Capitol Hill ... a strange place for a head lice treatment salon to ... between a Tuscan restaurant and a French bistro on E ... perfect. "We aren,t just any old lice clinic, we pride ... feel comfortable, and release some of the stigma associated with ...
(Date:2/23/2017)... , ... February 23, 2017 , ... ... the 12th annual Inventors Recognition Reception at Purdue Research Park of ... faculty member in recognition of outstanding contributions to, and success with, commercializing discoveries ...
Breaking Biology Technology: