Navigation Links
Seeking sustainability in a world of instability
Date:2/13/2008

FAIRBANKS, AlaskaFor most northern indigenous people, the roughly 3 million caribou in the world are their most important terrestrial subsistence resource, and while hunters and scientists alike have long expressed concern about the on-going availability of caribou, their perceptions of the causes of change have differed.

For years people have managed natural resources based on their knowledge of how ecosystems have functioned in the past, which assumes conditions of equilibrium, said Gary Kofinas, a resource policy and management scientist and director of the Resilience and Adaptation Program at the University of Alaska Fairbanks.

Today we are facing an unprecedented suite of possible changes affecting caribou and humans and with that considerable uncertainty, Kofinas said. Under the calving grounds of the Western [Alaska] Arctic Herd is one of the largest low-sulfur coal deposits in the world. The Teshekpuk Lake area of the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska, the calving grounds of the Teshekpuk Herd, is facing proposed oil development, and as you continue east across North America from calving ground to calving ground, you find activities or proposed activities for development of uranium and diamond mines, access roads, and other gas and oil development.

We also find that while university researchers are focused on climate change, agency resource managers are focused on development. To understand the future of this important resource, we all need to consider how climate change will interact with human change on the landscape, Kofinas said.

Kofinas will present Melding Social and Ecological Sustainability: Human-Caribou Systems Facing Rapid Change at the American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting Sunday, Feb. 17 in Boston.

Since the 1980s, several formal community-state co-management arrangements were established, in part, to resolve historic conflicts between traditional caribou users and managers using only scientific management. Ongoing changes in climate, land use and land claims settlements are testing the effectiveness of co-management to achieve regional consensus on how best to respond.

Groups cant just act as individuals, and they cant just share decision making, we need to think carefully about systems of adaptive co-management where we are challenging each other and learning from each other, Kofinas said. If we take the idea of achieving sustainability in a world of instability seriously, we have to work toward resource management systems that facilitate a kind of social learning that brings local and traditional knowledge together with the very best science.

Kofinas and colleagues from across the North founded the CircumArctic Rangifer Monitoring and Assessment network which is a collaboration among communities, scientists and governments from across the arctic to monitor change, exchange information, compare regional differences, build decision-support tools, and report on the status and use of wild caribou across the North.


'/>"/>

Contact: Marie Gilbert
marie.gilbert@uaf.edu
907-474-7412
University of Alaska Fairbanks
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Missouri board grants Washington University Sustainability Center $3 million
2. Biofuels Sustainability
3. Food and environmental sustainability focus of ASA-CSSA-SSSA Annual Meetings
4. Alaska graduate program in sustainability receives $3.2 million award
5. Quantum weirdness, parallel worlds, dinosaur poop, and the ultimate fate of the universe...
6. Big Mac: The whole world on your plate
7. Worlds largest investor coalition seeks further disclosure on climate change and shareholder value
8. American food: Still the best deal in the world
9. DOE JGI releases soybean genome assembly to enable worldwide bioenergy research efforts
10. World-leading journal publishes special issue on UN/GA
11. Worlds biggest heart model simulated at Université de Montréal
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/3/2017)... , April 3, 2017  Data ... precision engineering platform, detected a statistically significant ... product prior to treatment and objective response ... the potential to predict whether cancer patients ... to treatment, as well as to improve ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... 29, 2017  higi, the health IT company that ... North America , today announced a Series B ... of EveryMove. The new investment and acquisition accelerates higi,s ... to transform population health activities through the collection and ... higi collects and secures data today on behalf ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... Research and Markets has announced the addition ... Trends - Industry Forecast to 2025" report to their offering. ... The Global Biometric ... of around 15.1% over the next decade to reach approximately $1,580 ... market estimates and forecasts for all the given segments on global ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/10/2017)... ... October 10, 2017 , ... For the second time ... US2020 STEM Mentoring Award. Representatives of the FirstHand program travelled to Washington, D.C. ... US2020. , US2020’s mission is to change the trajectory of STEM education in ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... ... October 10, 2017 , ... The ... prestigious awards honoring scientists who have made outstanding contributions to analytical ... during Pittcon 2018, the world’s leading conference and exposition for laboratory science, which ...
(Date:10/9/2017)... ... October 09, 2017 , ... ... the medical journal, Epilepsia, Brain Sentinel’s SPEAC® System which uses the surface ... detecting generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS) using surface electromyography (sEMG). The prospective multicenter ...
(Date:10/6/2017)... ... October 06, 2017 , ... On ... and webinar on INSIGhT, the first-ever adaptive clinical trial for glioblastoma (GBM). The ... The event is free and open to the public, but registration is required. ...
Breaking Biology Technology: