Navigation Links
Scripps Research Scientist wins pair of grants to study critical component of memory
Date:1/5/2012

JUPITER, FL Sathyanaryanan Puthanveettil, an assistant professor on the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute, has been awarded a pair of notable grants to study a critical component of long-term memory formation.

Puthanveettil will receive $225,000 over three years from the prestigious Whitehall Foundation to study the role in long-term memory of a motor protein called kinesin. In this study, he will use the marine snail, Aplysia, a favorite of memory researchers because of its exceptionally large neurons and simple nervous system.

In addition to the Whitehall award, Puthanveettil has received a one-year, $100,000 grant from the Alzheimer's Drug Discovery Foundation.

Puthanveettil also plans to use the award to study kinesin, in this case to develop molecular screens to identify small molecules that can modulate kinesin function in the mammalian brain. This work will be conducted in collaboration with Scripps Research colleagues Peter Hodder, senior scientific director of lead identification, and William Roush, chemistry professor, executive director of Medicinal Chemistry, and associate dean of graduate studies at Scripps Florida.

"To be selected for an award by the Whitehall Foundation is a great honor," Puthanveettil said. "I'm also delighted with the grant from the Alzheimer's Drug Discovery Foundation, another important institution that supports the search for new therapeutics. Both awards will help advance my research substantially."

Puthanveettil has long been interested in axonal transport and its role in the molecular mechanisms underlying long-term memory storage, in particular the cellular transport of various gene products such as proteins and RNAs in the brain. In a 2008 study published in the journal Cell, Puthanveettil showed for the first time that the induction of long-term facilitationthe cellular basis of memory and learning involving enhancement of communication between neuronsrequires upregulation of specific isoform of kinesin.

Ultimately, he hopes his research will lead to an understanding of the basic pathology of various neurological disorders.

"For example, in the case of Huntington's disease, kinesin is responsible for transport of molecules that play a role in the disease," he said. "We want to know how the transport of these molecules is modified during the disease's development. Likewise for Alzheimer's diseaseif you can find a way to manipulate the transport system, you may be able to overcome some of the defects involved in the disease's pathology."


'/>"/>
Contact: Mika Ono
mikaono@scripps.edu
858-784-2052
Scripps Research Institute
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. Scripps Research scientists discover a brain cell malfunction in schizophrenia
2. Scripps Florida scientist awarded $3.4 million for HIV/AIDS research
3. Scripps Research scientists uncover new role for gene in maintaining steady weight
4. Scripps Research team finds a weak spot on deadly ebolavirus
5. Scripps research scientists develop brand new class of small molecules through innovative chemistry
6. Scripps Health/the Medicines Company announce late breaking BRIDGE trial results presented at TCT
7. Scripps research team achieves critical step to opening elusive class of compounds to drug discovery
8. Scripps Research scientist awarded $500,000 grant to study Parkinsons disease
9. Scripps launches whole genome sequencing study to find root causes of idiopathic diseases
10. Scripps and Complete Genomics to collaborate on genetic research study on healthy aging
11. 2 Scripps Research scientists win prestigious NIH Innovator Awards
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Scripps Research Scientist wins pair of grants to study critical component of memory
(Date:3/27/2017)... March 27, 2017  Catholic Health Services (CHS) ... Systems Society (HIMSS) Analytics for achieving Stage 6 ... sm . In addition, CHS previously earned a ... using an electronic medical record (EMR). ... level of EMR usage in an outpatient setting.  ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... PUNE, India , March 23, 2017 The report ... Equipment, Touchless Biometric), Industry, and Geography - Global Forecast to 2022", published by ... growing at a CAGR of 29.63% between 2017 and 2022. ... ... Logo ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... 2017 Optimove , provider of ... such as 1-800-Flowers and AdoreMe, today announced two ... Replenishment. Using Optimove,s machine learning algorithms, these features ... replenishment recommendations to their customers based not just ... customer intent drawn from a complex web of ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:9/19/2017)... , ... September 19, 2017 , ... ... largest group of funded early-stage tech companies. “Grit” author Angela Duckworth and her ... joining the ic@3401 community is Cooley, an international law firm with decades of ...
(Date:9/19/2017)... ... 2017 , ... The new and improved Oakton® pocket testers, from Cole-Parmer, stand ... with a new cap design that is versatile, functional and leakproof. They are ideal ... test water quality. , The Oakton pocket testers have many user-friendly and functional features. ...
(Date:9/19/2017)... , Sept. 19, 2017 ValGenesis Inc., ... (VLMS) is pleased to announce the strategic partnership with ... provide clients with validation services using the latest technology ... VTI will provide clients with efficient and cost-effective validation ... marketing partner for the ValGenesis VLMS system. ...
(Date:9/19/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Molecular Devices, LLC, a leader in protein ... the CloneSelect™ Single-Cell Printer™ in North America. This novel system utilizes sophisticated ... documentation of monoclonality for use in cell line development. , Clonal cell ...
Breaking Biology Technology: