Navigation Links
Scripps Florida scientists awarded $8.4 million grant to develop new anti-smoking treatments
Date:5/14/2012

JUPITER, FL, May 14, 2012 Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute has been awarded an $8.4 million grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to develop new compounds to help prevent relapse in smokers who are kicking the habit.

The new five-year NIH award is a program project grant, which is designed to support an institutionally based research program with a well-defined research focus that requires several interrelated subprojects as part of the overall study.

Paul Kenny, a Scripps Research associate professor, is the program director and principal investigator for the study.

"This really is a broad-based, multi-disciplinary team effort," Kenny said. "We've assembled a team of first-class scientists at Scripps Florida with all the experience necessary to develop novel therapeutics for the treatment of tobacco abuse."

Others involved in the study are Michael Cameron, Theodore Kamenecka, and Patricia McDonald of The Translational Research Institute on the Scripps Florida campus.

Tobacco smoking is a global scourge, killing more than 5 million people each year worldwide, according to the World Health Organization. It is estimated that if current trends continue, by 2020 smoking will become the largest single health problem worldwide. The World Bank estimates that in high-income countries, smoking-related healthcare accounts for between 6 and 15 percent of all healthcare costs, some $160 billion annually.

Nicotine addiction is notoriously hard to break. Even with the most effective smoking-cessation agents available, more than 80 percent of smokers who quit or attempt to quit will relapse.

To combat these dismal statistics, the study is focused on an entirely new mechanism to help smokers break the habit.

That mechanism is a receptor for a specific neuropeptide (short chain of amino acids found in nerve tissue) that, when blocked, significantly decreases the desire for nicotine in animal models.

The neuropeptide, known as hypocretin-1 or orexin A, initiates a key signaling cascade that maintains tobacco addiction in human smokers. In a 2008 study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Kenny and colleagues showed that blocking hypocretin-1 receptors not only decreased nicotine use in animal models, but also abolished the stimulatory effects of nicotine on brain reward circuitries. These results demonstrated that hypocretin-1 plays a major role in driving the desire for more nicotine.

These findings also highlighted the importance of hypocretin-1 receptors in a region of the brain called the insula, a walnut size part of the frontal lobe. While all mammals have insula regions that sense the body's internal physiological state and direct responses to maintain homeostasis, this region has also been implicated in cravings. In one study, it was reported that smokers who sustained damage to the insula lost the desire to smoke, an insight that revealed the insula as key for sustaining the tobacco habit in smokers.


'/>"/>

Contact: Mika Ono
mikaono@scripps.edu
858-784-2052
Scripps Research Institute
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. Plastic trash altering ocean habitats, Scripps study shows
2. Scripps Florida scientists identify neurotranmitters that lead to forgetting
3. Scripps Florida scientist awarded $1.5 million to design therapeutics with new RNA approach
4. Scripps research scientists find anticonvulsant drug helps marijuana smokers kick the habit
5. Scientist wins $3 million renewal of one of longest-running NIH grants to Scripps Research
6. Scripps Research Institute scientists develop antidote for cocaine overdose
7. Scripps Research Institute Professor Gerald F. Joyce elected to American Academy of Arts & Sciences
8. Scripps Research Institute scientists find promising vaccine targets on hepatitis C virus
9. Scripps Research discoveries lead to newly approved drug for infant respiratory distress syndrome
10. Scripps Florida scientists awarded $3 million to develop new, more effective pain treatments
11. Scripps Florida team awarded nearly $1.5 million to develop potent new HIV inhibitors
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Scripps Florida scientists awarded $8.4 million grant to develop new anti-smoking treatments
(Date:3/22/2016)... , PROVO and ... -- Newborn Screening Ontario (NSO), which operates the highest ... for molecular testing, and Tute Genomics and UNIConnect, leaders ... technology respectively, today announced the launch of a project ... sequencing (NGS) testing panel. NSO has ...
(Date:3/17/2016)... , March 17, 2016 ABI Research, ... forecasts the global biometrics market will reach more ... 118% increase from 2015. Consumer electronics, particularly smartphones, ... fingerprint sensors anticipated to reach two billion shipments ... Dimitrios Pavlakis , Research Analyst at ABI ...
(Date:3/14/2016)... 14, 2016 NXTD ) ("NXT-ID" or ... market, announces the airing of a new series of commercials ... of March 21 st .  The commercials will air on ... Squawk on the Street show. --> NXTD ) ... mobile commerce market, announces the airing of a new series ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:4/27/2016)... ... 27, 2016 , ... NDA Partners Chairman Carl Peck, ... Expert Consultant. Mr. Clark was formerly a Vice President with US Pharmacopeia, ... molecule monographs based on analytical methods. NDA Partners Expert Consultants are top ...
(Date:4/27/2016)... ... April 27, 2016 , ... Global Stem Cells ... Advisory Board. Ross is the founder of GSCG affiliate Kimera Labs in Miami. , ... he studied hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for hematologic disorders and the suppression of graft ...
(Date:4/27/2016)... , April 27, 2016 ... research report with specific focus on US, EU, ... Japan , to the healthcare business intelligence ... library. Complete report on the Flow ... companies and supported with 282 tables and figures ...
(Date:4/26/2016)... ... ... The European Patent Office (EPO) today announced that U.S. Biophysicist ... Inventor Award 2016 in the category "Non-European countries." The winners of the 11th edition ... on June 9th. , The human capacity to walk with fluidity is the sum ...
Breaking Biology Technology: