Navigation Links
Scientists use biomedical technique to image marine worm

Scientists have for the first time successfully imaged the internal tissues of a soft bodied marine worm at high resolution using a technique borrowed from biomedical science. The findings are published in the Journal of Microscopy.

"Invertebrate worms are important for the functioning of marine ecosystems, and studies of their internal anatomy are needed to understand their physiology, ecology and evolution," explained John Dinley of the University of Southampton's School of Ocean and Earth Science based at the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton.

"Techniques such as dissection and the cutting of sections for light or electron microscopy studies are time consuming and destructive. What is really needed is a reliable, non-invasive method that can be used in the laboratory," he added.

In conjunction with Professor Ian Sinclair of the University of Southampton's Department of Engineering and other colleagues, Dinley has helped develop the use of a technique called micro-computed x-ray tomography (micro-CT) for scanning the internal structure soft-bodied marine worms.

In micro-CT scanning, the object to be scanned is rotated within a stationary x-ray beam, and magnified images are received onto a detector screen. The researchers have successfully used a bench-top micro-CT scanner to produce high-definition images of the internal structure of the predatory, burrowing worm Nephtys hombergii, specimens of which were collected from the sands of Poole Harbour.

"We believe that this is the first time this technique has been developed and successfully applied to the soft tissues of invertebrates without the use of tissue enhancing stains or radio-opaque fluids," said Dinley.

Impressive three-dimensional rotating and fly-through images have also been produced, which can be invaluable in the assessment of many aspects of functional anatomy.

As a direct result of this work, a micro-CT machine has been installed in the Natural History Museum in London. Now museum specimens or even living specimens can be scanned and their internal organs carefully examined and compared with this rapid, non-invasive and non-destructive technique.

"Large-scale comparative anatomical studies are now feasible that will lead to greater evolutionary insights," says Dinley.


Contact: Dr. Rory Howlett
National Oceanography Centre, Southampton (UK)

Related biology news :

1. UK scientists working to help cut ID theft
2. Scientists show that mitochondrial DNA variants are linked to risk factors for type 2 diabetes
3. Comet probes reveal evidence of origin of life, scientists claim
4. Scientists link fragile X tremor/ataxia syndrome to binding protein in RNA
5. Male elephants get photo IDs from scientists
6. Scientists retrace evolution with first atomic structure of an ancient protein
7. Muscle mass: Scientists identify novel mode of transcriptional regulation during myogenesis
8. Carnegie Mellon scientists develop nanogels that enable controlled delivery of carbohydrate drugs
9. Clemson scientists shed light on molecules in living cells
10. Scientists tackle mystery mountain illness
11. T. rex quicker than Becks, say scientists
Post Your Comments:
Related Image:
Scientists use biomedical technique to image marine worm
(Date:6/15/2016)... 15, 2016 Transparency Market ... Recognition Market by Application Market - Global Industry Analysis Size ... to the report, the  global gesture recognition market ... and is estimated to grow at a CAGR ... 2024.  Increasing application of gesture recognition ...
(Date:6/3/2016)... 3, 2016 Das ... Nepal hat ein 44 ... geprägter Kennzeichen, einschließlich Personalisierung, Registrierung und IT-Infrastruktur, ... Produktion und Implementierung von Identitätsmanagementlösungen. Zahlreiche renommierte ... Januar teilgenommen, aber Decatur wurde als konformste ...
(Date:6/1/2016)... , June 1, 2016 ... in Election Administration and Criminal Identification to Boost Global ... a recently released TechSci Research report, " Global Biometrics ... Region, Competition Forecast and Opportunities, 2011 - 2021", the ... billion by 2021, on account of growing security concerns ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/27/2016)... ... June 27, 2016 , ... Parallel 6 , the leading software as ... Clinical Reach Virtual Patient Encounter CONSULT module which enables both audio and video ... trial team. , Using the CONSULT module, patients and physicians can schedule a face ...
(Date:6/27/2016)... , June 27, 2016  Liquid Biotech ... the funding of a Sponsored Research Agreement with ... tumor cells (CTCs) from cancer patients.  The funding ... CTC levels correlate with clinical outcomes in cancer ... data will then be employed to support the ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... SAN DIEGO , June 24, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... that more sensitively detects cancers susceptible to PARP ... individual circulating tumor cells (CTCs). The new test ... of HRD-targeted therapeutics in multiple cancer types. ... therapies targeting DNA damage response pathways, including PARP, ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... ... June 23, 2016 , ... Mosio, a leader ... “Clinical Trials Patient Recruitment and Retention Tips.” Partnering with experienced clinical research professionals, ... providing practical tips, tools, and strategies for clinical researchers. , “The landscape of ...
Breaking Biology Technology: