Navigation Links
Scientists produce eye structures from human blood-derived stem cells
Date:3/14/2012

MADISON -- For the first time, scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have made early retina structures containing proliferating neuroretinal progenitor cells using induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells derived from human blood.

And in another advance, the retina structures showed the capacity to form layers of cells as the retina does in normal human development and these cells possessed the machinery that could allow them to communicate information. (Light-sensitive photoreceptor cells in the retina along the back wall of the eye produce impulses that are ultimately transmitted through the optic nerve and then to the brain, allowing you to see.) Put together, these findings suggest that it is possible to assemble human retinal cells into more complex retinal tissues, all starting from a routine patient blood sample.

Many applications of laboratory-built human retinal tissues can be envisioned, including using them to test drugs and study degenerative diseases of the retina such as retinitis pigmentosa, a prominent cause of blindness in children and young adults. One day, it may also be possible replace multiple layers of the retina in order to help patients with more widespread retinal damage.

"We don't know how far this technology will take us, but the fact that we are able to grow a rudimentary retina structure from a patient's blood cells is encouraging, not only because it confirms our earlier work using human skin cells, but also because blood as a starting source is convenient to obtain," says Dr. David Gamm, pediatric ophthalmologist and senior author of the study. "This is a solid step forward."

In 2011, the Gamm lab at the UW Waisman Center created structures from the most primitive stage of retinal development using embryonic stem cells and stem cells derived from human skin. While those structures generated the major types of retinal cells, including photoreceptors, they lacked the organization found in more mature retina.

This time, the team, led by Gamm, Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences in the UW School of Medicine and Public Health, and postdoctoral researcher and lead author Dr. Joseph Phillips, used their method to grow retina-like tissue from iPS cells derived from human blood gathered via standard blood draw techniques.

In their study, about 16 percent of the initial retinal structures developed distinct layers. The outermost layer primarily contained photoreceptors, whereas the middle and inner layers harbored intermediary retinal neurons and ganglion cells, respectively. This particular arrangement of cells is reminiscent of what is found in the back of the eye. Further, work by Dr. Phillips showed that these retinal cells were capable of making synapses, a prerequisite for them to communicate with one another.

The iPS cells used in the study were generated through collaboration with Cellular Dynamics International (CDI) of Madison, Wis., who pioneered the technique to convert blood cells into iPS cells. CDI scientists extracted a type of blood cell called a T-lymphocyte from the donor sample, and reprogrammed the cells into iPS cells. CDI was founded by UW stem cell pioneer Dr. James Thomson.

"We were fortunate that CDI shared an interest in our work. Combining our lab's expertise with that of CDI was critical to the success of this study," added Dr. Gamm.


'/>"/>
Contact: Lisa Brunette
lbrunette@uwhealth.org
608-263-5830
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Queens scientists seek vaccine for Pseudomonas infection
2. Stanford scientists develop gene therapy approach to grow blood vessels in ischemic limbs
3. A*STAR scientists make groundbreaking discovery on stem cell regulation
4. Scripps Florida scientists awarded $3 million to develop new, more effective pain treatments
5. Scientists learn how insects remodel their bodies between life stages
6. UF scientists name new ancient camels from Panama Canal excavation
7. MU scientists study how to improve pesticide efficiency
8. Southern insect scientists to meet in Little Rock
9. Emerge attracts futurists to collaborate with scientists, designers artists is redesign of future
10. Geological Society of America member scientists, students, and colleagues meet in Texas
11. Inspired by gecko feet, UMass Amherst scientists invent super-adhesive material
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:5/12/2016)... 12, 2016 WearablesResearch.com , a brand ... overview results from the Q1 wave of its quarterly ... was consumers, receptivity to a program where they would ... health insurance company. "We were surprised to ... Michael LaColla , CEO of Troubadour Research, "primarily ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... and BANGALORE, India , April 28, 2016 ... a product subsidiary of Infosys (NYSE: INFY ), ... a global partnership that will provide end customers ... mobile banking and payment services.      (Logo: ... innovation area for financial services, but it also plays a ...
(Date:4/26/2016)... April 27, 2016 Research ... Multi-modal Biometrics Market 2016-2020"  report to their offering.  ... The analysts forecast the global multimodal ... 15.49% during the period 2016-2020.  Multimodal ... sectors such as the healthcare, BFSI, transportation, automotive, ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:5/24/2016)... ... May 24, 2016 , ... Last week, Callan Capital, an integrated wealth management ... The Future of San Diego Life Science event at the Estancia La Jolla Resort ... the event with speakers Dr. Rich Heyman, former CEO of Aragon and Seragon, and ...
(Date:5/23/2016)... Zimmer Biomet Holdings, Inc. (NYSE and SIX: ZBH), ... Board of Directors has approved the payment of a quarterly ... The cash dividend of $0.24 per share ... stockholders of record as of the close of business on ... approval of the Board of Directors and may be adjusted ...
(Date:5/23/2016)... ... May 23, 2016 , ... Foresight Institute , ... the winners for the 2015 Foresight Institute Feynman Prizes. , These prestigious ... categories, one for experiment and the other for theory in nanotechnology. Prof. Markus ...
(Date:5/20/2016)... ... May 20, 2016 , ... Korean researchers say Manumycin A ... offer a new way to treat the disease. Surviving Mesothelioma has just posted an ... Scientists from several Korean institutions based their mesothelioma study on the fact the Manumycin ...
Breaking Biology Technology: