Navigation Links
Scientists present 'moving' theory behind bacterial decision-making
Date:11/24/2008

Biochemists at North Carolina State University have answered a fundamental question of how important bacterial proteins make life-and-death decisions that allow them to function, a finding that could provide a new target for drugs to disrupt bacterial decision-making processes and related diseases.

In a study published this month in the journal Structure, the NC State scientists show for the first time that the specific movements of these important bacterial proteins, called transition-state regulators, guide how the proteins bind with DNA and thus control a variety of functions. These rare proteins are like army generals sizing up a battlefield; while they all look the same and have the same rank, their highly specialized "wiggles" allow them to figure out how to bind to different parts of DNA, triggering defense capabilities, for example, or commands to set up camp and chow down.

"For the first time, we've shown that proteins with identical shapes have different movements, and these movements allow proteins to select proper DNA targets that lead to tens or hundreds of processes," says Dr. John Cavanagh, William Neal Reynolds Distinguished Professor of Molecular and Structural Biochemistry at NC State and the corresponding author of the paper. "Motion is really important. If the proteins didn't move, they wouldn't be able to bind to DNA and therefore to function."

Cavanagh and NC State senior biochemistry researcher Dr. Benjamin Bobay, a paper co-author, say that the findings present a new way of thinking about stopping bacteria. If a drug or antibiotic can stymie the motion of the transition-state regulators, the thinking goes, bacteria won't be able to figure out where to bind to DNA, effectively shutting the bacteria down. Killing a general, therefore, would stop the infantry from taking the battlefield.

Besides the fundamental knowledge about bacterial protein movement and DNA binding, the Structure paper also sheds light on the specific bacterial protein responsible for producing anthrax toxins.

One of the transition-state regulators studied by the NC State biochemists, called AbrB, helps control the production of the three toxins in anthrax: lethal factor, edema factor and protective antigen. Production of all three of these toxins is necessary to make anthrax lethal.

Cavanagh and Bobay say that knowledge of AbrB's function could make it a likely target for a drug that would knock out its function. That would prevent anthrax from "going lethal."

"We now know more about the protein that causes you to die from anthrax poisoning and a brand new way of understanding how important proteins bind to targets," Cavanagh said. "This presents a whole new paradigm for drug design in the arms race against harmful bacteria and disease."


'/>"/>

Contact: Dr. John Cavanagh
john_cavanagh@ncsu.edu
919-513-4349
North Carolina State University
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. UK scientists working to help cut ID theft
2. Scientists show that mitochondrial DNA variants are linked to risk factors for type 2 diabetes
3. Comet probes reveal evidence of origin of life, scientists claim
4. Scientists link fragile X tremor/ataxia syndrome to binding protein in RNA
5. Male elephants get photo IDs from scientists
6. Scientists retrace evolution with first atomic structure of an ancient protein
7. Muscle mass: Scientists identify novel mode of transcriptional regulation during myogenesis
8. Carnegie Mellon scientists develop nanogels that enable controlled delivery of carbohydrate drugs
9. Clemson scientists shed light on molecules in living cells
10. Scientists tackle mystery mountain illness
11. T. rex quicker than Becks, say scientists
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/6/2017)... MATEO, Calif. , March 6, 2017 /PRNewswire/ ... marketing and sales technology, today announced Predictive Sales ... solution for infusing actionable sales intelligence into Salesforce. ... to automatically enable their sales organizations with deep ... messages that allow for intelligent engagement. Predictive Sales ...
(Date:3/2/2017)... March 2, 2017 Who risk to be ... Download the full report: https://www.reportbuyer.com/product/4313699/ WILL ... SENSOR FIELD? Fingerprint sensors using capacitive technology represent ... sensor vendor Idex forecasts an increase of 360% of ... and of the fingerprint sensor market between 2014 and ...
(Date:2/28/2017)... --  Acuant , a leading provider of data capture ... new and core technologies building upon the acquisition of ... desktop Acuant FRM TM facial recognition and match ... manual review of identity documents by accredited professionals. ... most accurate capture software to streamline workflows by securely ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:3/24/2017)... 24, 2017   Sienna Biopharmaceuticals, Inc. , a ... announced that Richard Peterson will join the ... Peterson, who brings more than two decades of ... who is retiring at the end of April but ... Peterson joins Sienna from Novan, Inc., where he served ...
(Date:3/23/2017)...  Northwest Biotherapeutics (OTCQB: NWBO) (NW Bio), a ... solid tumor cancers, today announced that yesterday it ... last Friday, March 17, 2017. ... totaling 28,843,692 shares, comprised of 18,843,692 common shares ... Class C Warrants pre-funded at the closing at ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... , March 23, 2017 Kineta, Inc., ... of novel therapies in immuno-oncology, today announced the ... small molecule compounds that activate interferon response factor ... and demonstrate immune-mediated tumor regression in a murine ... study who demonstrated complete tumor regression to initial ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... ... March 23, 2017 , ... Advanced Polymer Monitoring ... of Dr. Sigmund “Sig” Floyd as Vice President ? Global Business Development. Dr. ... activities. , “Dr. Floyd’s career has spanned 30 years in the chemicals and ...
Breaking Biology Technology: