Navigation Links
Scientists look to microbes to unlock Earth's deep secrets
Date:1/10/2012

Of all the habitable parts of our planet, one ecosystem still remains largely unexplored and unknown to science: the igneous ocean crust.

This rocky realm of hard volcanic lava exists beneath ocean sediments that lie at the bottom of much of the world's oceans.

While scientists have estimated that microbes living in deep ocean sediments may represent as much as one-third of Earth's total biomass, the habitable portion of the rocky ocean crust may be 10 times as great.

Yet biologists know very little about this ecosystem. The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Mid-Atlantic Ridge Microbiology Expedition set out to change that.

An international team of scientists sailing onboard the research vessel JOIDES Resolution recently returned from installing observatories beneath the seafloor in "North Pond"--a remote area in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean.

Scientists hope that data collected from these subseafloor observatories (known as CORKs, or Circulation Obviation Retrofit Kits), along with studies of rock and sediment samples collected during the expedition, will help to shed light on the role tiny subseafloor microbes play in shaping Earth's oceans and crust.

Led by co-chief scientists Wolfgang Bach of the University of Bremen in Germany and Katrina Edwards of the University of Southern California, the expedition began in Bridgetown, Barbados, on Sep. 16, 2011, and concluded in Ponta Delgada in the Azores on Nov. 17, 2011.

Two CORKs were successfully installed, and sediment and basalt core samples were recovered. CORK observatories are designed to remain in place for up to ten years.

The North Pond subseafloor observatories will allow active experiments to be conducted below the bottom of the ocean for as much as five years after deployment.

Scientists from the expedition plan to return to these observatories with the first of many submersible expeditions in early 2012.

"The innovative and novel experiments and observations from this expedition promise to greatly advance our understanding of the nature and extent of microbial life in the most widespread of environments--the Earth's ocean crust," says Jamie Allan, program director for IODP at the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF). NSF co-funds IODP.

In the coming months and years, researchers hope to answer three main questions:

What is the nature of subseafloor microbial communities, and what is their role in the alteration of relatively young ocean crust?

Are these communities unique, particularly in comparison with seafloor and sedimentary communities?

Where do microbes in the igneous ocean crust come from (sediment, rock, seawater or another source)?
'/>"/>

Contact: Cheryl Dybas
cdybas@nsf.gov
703-292-7734
National Science Foundation
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. Nobel history illustrates gap in grants to young scientists
2. Damon Runyon grants Fellowship and Breakthrough Scientist awards to 21 top young scientists
3. UCSB scientists say topography played key role in Deepwater Horizon disaster
4. Illinois scientists link dietary DHA to male fertility
5. Scientists refute Greenpeace claim that genetically modified corn caused new insect pest
6. Scientists characterize protein essential to survival of malaria parasite
7. University scientists aiding fishermen in butterfish conundrum
8. Salk scientists map the frontiers of vision
9. UGA scientists hijack bacterial immune system
10. Scripps Research scientists discover a brain cell malfunction in schizophrenia
11. Sea snails help scientists explore a possible way to enhance memory
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Scientists look to microbes to unlock Earth's deep secrets
(Date:3/14/2016)... , Allemagne, March 14, 2016 ... http://www.apimages.com ) - --> - Renvoi : ... - --> --> ... solutions biométriques, fournit de nouveaux lecteurs d,empreintes digitales ... LF10 de DERMALOG sera utilisé pour produire des ...
(Date:3/11/2016)... , March 11, 2016 ... market research report "Image Recognition Market by Technology (Pattern ... and Advertising), by Deployment Type (On-Premises and Cloud), by ... 2022", published by MarketsandMarkets, the global market is expected ... USD 29.98 Billion by 2020, at a CAGR of ...
(Date:3/10/2016)... , March 10, 2016   Unisys Corporation ... and Border Protection (CBP) is testing its biometric identity ... San Diego to help identify certain non-U.S. citizens ... . The test, designed to help determine the efficiency and ... began in February and will run until May 2016. ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:5/3/2016)... ... 2016 , ... Flagship Biosciences, the leader in tissue ... of Directors. Dr. Gillett recently retired from Charles River Laboratories (CRL), where, in ... Officer. A board-certified veterinary pathologist, Dr. Gillett joined Charles River in 1999 through ...
(Date:5/3/2016)... ... May 03, 2016 , ... According to world renowned prostate cancer surgeon, ... patients traditionally had two main treatment options: surgery or radiation. Based on a patient’s ... New technology has enabled doctors to administer higher doses of radiation to ...
(Date:5/2/2016)... ... 02, 2016 , ... F.E.E.D. Co., the Feline Environmental Enrichment ... veterinarian-designed product for indoor cats. The NoBowl Feeding System replaces the bowl with ... way nature intended. NoBowls make cats happy and healthy. , Since being introduced ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... , ... April 29, 2016 , ... ... necessary fundamentals to transform technology into a viable company, CereScan’s CEO, John Kelley, ... Mr. Kelley, a recognized leader and mentor in the Denver area business community, ...
Breaking Biology Technology: