Navigation Links
Scientists highlight the importance of nutrients for coral reefs
Date:2/27/2014

A new publication from researchers at the University of Southampton and the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton highlights the importance of nutrients for coral reef survival.

Despite the comparably small footprint they take on the ocean floor, tropical coral reefs are home to a substantial part of all marine life forms. Coral reefs also provide numerous benefits for human populations, providing food for millions and protecting coastal areas from erosion. Moreover, they are a treasure chest of potential pharmaceuticals and coral reef tourism provides recreation and income for many.

Unfortunately, coral reefs are declining at an alarming rate. To promote management activities that can help coral reef survival, an international group of world renowned scientists have summarised the present knowledge about the challenges that coral reefs are facing now and in the future in a special issue of the journal Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability.

The contribution of scientists from the University of Southampton to this special issue, which highlights the crucial role of nutrients for the functioning of coral reefs, can be freely downloaded from http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1877343513001917

The University of Southampton researchers who are based at the Coral Reef Laboratory in the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, explain that "too many" nutrients can be as bad for corals as "not enough".

Professor Jrg Wiedenmann, Professor of Biological Oceanography at the University of Southampton and Head of the Coral Reef Laboratory, says: "The nutrient biology of coral reefs is immensely complex. It is important to distinguish between the different direct and indirect effects that a disturbance of the natural nutrient environment can have on a coral reef ecosystem."

Since corals live in a symbiotic relationship with microscopically small plant cells, they require certain amounts of nutrients as "fertiliser". In fact, the experimental addition of nutrients can promote coral growth. "One should not conclude from such findings, however, that nutrient enrichment is beneficial for coral reefs usually the opposite is true," explains Dr Cecilia D'Angelo, Senior Research Fellow in the Coral Reef Laboratory and co-author on the article.

Professor Wiedenmann, whose research on coral reef nutrient biology is supported by one of the prestigious Starting Grants from the European Research Commission, adds: "Too many nutrients harm corals in many different ways, easily outweighing the positive effects that they can undoubtedly have for the coralalga association. Paradoxically, the initial addition of nutrients to the water column might result in nutrient starvation of the corals at a later stage. In this publication, we conceptualise the important role that the competition for nutrients by phytoplankton, the free-living relatives of the corals' symbiotic algae, may have in this context."

"Nutrient pollution will continue to increase in many coral reefs. Therefore, an important prerequisite to develop efficient management strategies is a profound understanding of the different mechanisms by which corals suffer from nutrient stress."


'/>"/>
Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-023-805-93212
University of Southampton
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. Scientists learn how pathogens hack our immune systems to go undetected
2. NPL scientists blend synthetic air to measure climate change
3. Southern insect scientists meeting in Greenville, S.C.
4. Scientists transform skin cells into functioning liver cells
5. Scientists unlock a microbial Pompeii
6. Scientists identify long distance scanner for DNA damage
7. A*STAR scientists discover proteins role in human memory and learning functions
8. Kids and insect scientists to meet in San Antonio
9. Wistar scientists develop gene test to accurately classify brain tumors
10. Ticks may cause double trouble, Stanford scientists find
11. Scientists call for new stewardship of the deep ocean: Earths last frontier
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Scientists highlight the importance of nutrients for coral reefs
(Date:3/24/2017)... The Controller General of Immigration from Maldives Mr. Mohamed Anwar ... prestigious international IAIR Award for the most innovative high security ePassport and ... ... Maldives Immigration Controller General, Mr. Mohamed ... the right) have received the IAIR award for the "Most innovative high ...
(Date:3/22/2017)...   Neurotechnology , a provider of high-precision ... the release of the SentiVeillance 6.0 ... recognition using up to 10 surveillance, security and ... new version uses deep neural-network-based facial detection and ... a Graphing Processing Unit (GPU) for enhanced speed. ...
(Date:3/20/2017)... PMD Healthcare announces the release of its ... System (WMS), a remote, real-time lung health monitoring and ... is a Medical Device, Digital Health, and Chronic Care ... innovative solutions that empower people to improve their healthcare ... developed the first ever personal spirometer, Spiro PD, which ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/20/2017)... ... ... Biologist Dawn Maslar MS has found a biomarker that she claims verifies ... The Neuroscience of Meeting, Dating, Losing Your Mind, and Finding True Love, Maslar found ... step, in my estimation, was to scientifically track the evidence of commitment in men,” ...
(Date:6/20/2017)... ... June 20, 2017 , ... GigaGen Inc ., a ... repertoires, announces launch of its new Surge(TM) Discovery service at the ... GigaGen, will present on Surge at the conference. , Surge is the new, ...
(Date:6/16/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Cognition Corporation , a software company ... of its “From the Helm” Webinar Series. , The next two free ... design control exercises. Led by David Cronin, Cognition’s CEO, the half-hour public webinars ...
(Date:6/15/2017)... ... June 15, 2017 , ... The ... an artist’s journey through creative experimentation and interdisciplinary collaboration. Feature Creep, a solo ... 22nd. An opening reception will be held at EKG, located at 3600 Market ...
Breaking Biology Technology: