Navigation Links
Scientists find gene for high cholesterol in blood
Date:9/15/2010

Scientists at the Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research (SFBR) in San Antonio have found a gene that causes high levels of bad cholesterol to accumulate in the blood as a result of a high-cholesterol diet.

Researchers studied a strain of laboratory opossums developed at SFBR that has normal blood levels of "bad" low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol when fed a standard low-cholesterol diet, but extremely elevated levels of LDL cholesterol when fed a high-cholesterol diet. These high-responding opossums are used to identify the genes and the underlying mechanisms that control response to dietary cholesterol.

"This research will improve our understanding of cholesterol metabolism and may shed light on why some people have high levels of bad cholesterol in blood while others do not when they consume cholesterol-enriched diets," said John L. VandeBerg, Ph.D., SFBR's chief scientific officer and senior author on the paper. Published in the October issue of the Journal of Lipid Research, the work was funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Robert J. Kleberg, Jr. and Helen C. Kleberg Foundation.

The study involved analyzing various lipids, or fats, in blood and bile to find differences in cholesterol metabolites, sequencing candidate genes of interest to find mutations, and determining the impact of each mutation by genetic analyses. This led to the discovery that the ABCB4 gene, which encodes a protein known to transport fats from the liver into bile to facilitate excretion of cholesterol from the body, is defective in the high responders. Malfunction of the ABCB4 protein was found to impair cholesterol excretion, causing bad cholesterol to accumulate in the blood when a high-cholesterol diet is consumed.

"This is the first report to show that ABCB4 has a role in controlling blood cholesterol levels in response to dietary cholesterol in an animal model," said VandeBerg.

The next step is to determine if any ABCB4 mutations have an effect on levels of LDL cholesterol in humans who consume a high cholesterol diet. "If we can identify early in life those people who are going to be adversely affected by consumption of high levels of cholesterol, we can encourage their parents and them to receive individually tailored counseling to establish dietary habits that protect them from cardiovascular disease," VandeBerg said.


'/>"/>

Contact: Joseph Carey
jcarey@sfbr.org
210-258-9437
Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Jefferson scientists deliver toxic genes to effectively kill pancreatic cancer cells
2. Scientists identify novel inhibitor of human microRNA
3. Argonne scientists peer into heart of compound that may detect chemical, biological weapons
4. MU scientists go green with gold, distribute environmentally friendly nanoparticles
5. Scientists identify gene that may contribute to improved rice yield
6. Scientists discover why a mothers high-fat diet contributes to obesity in her children
7. MU scientists see how HIV matures into an infection
8. Earth scientists keep an eye on Texas
9. Thinking it through: Scientists call for policy to guide biofuels industry toward sustainability
10. Scientists identify a molecule that coordinates the movement of cells
11. Scientists Find new migratory patterns for Mediterranean and Western Atlantic bluefin tuna
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:12/7/2016)... AVIV, Israel , December 7, 2016 ... with the expansion of its patent portfolio, which grew to over 40 ... , , ... by its recently filed patent entitled " System, Device, and ... covers technology that enables device makers to forego costly hardware components needed ...
(Date:12/6/2016)... Dec. 6, 2016 Valencell , the leading ... has seen a third consecutive year of triple digit ... in 2016 with a 360 percent increase in companies ... increase was driven by sales of its wrist and ... in its technology for hearables for fitness and healthcare ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... AUSTIN, Texas , Dec. 1, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... provider, today announced BioLock , an electrocardiogram ... and health monitoring, a key IoT asset. The ... embedded into a vehicle,s steering wheel and mobile ... a simple touch. As vehicle technology ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:12/8/2016)... report analyzes the worldwide markets for Biostimulants in US$ by ... Extract Based, and Others. The report also analyzes the Global ... Crops, and Others. The report provides separate comprehensive analytics for ... , Europe , Asia-Pacific ... of World. Annual estimates and forecasts are provided for the ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... Dec. 8, 2016  Biotheranostics today announced that ... of the Breast Cancer Index (BCI) in identifying ... are most at-risk for disease recurrence and might ... from three studies advancing the understanding of the ... tumor biology and inform decisions related to patient ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... 2016 Oxford Gene ... seine Palette an anpassbaren SureSeq™ NGS-Panels mit dem ... das ein schnelles und kostengünstiges Studium der Varianten ... eine Erkennung von Einzel-Nukleotid-Variationen (Single Nucleotide Variation, SNV) ... kleinen Panel und ermöglicht eine individuelle Anpassung durch ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... Francisco, CA (PRWEB) , ... December 08, 2016 ... ... Oculus as finalists in the World Technology Awards. uBiome is one of just ... received across all categories. , In addition to uBiome, companies nominated as finalists ...
Breaking Biology Technology: