Navigation Links
Scientists discover that thyroid cancer cells become less aggressive in outer space
Date:1/30/2014

For those who think that space exploration offers no tangible benefits for those of us on earth, a new research discovery involving thyroid cancer may prove otherwise. In a new report appearing in the February 2014 issue of The FASEB Journal, researchers from Germany and Denmark show that some tumors which are aggressive on earth are considerably less aggressive in microgravity. By understanding the genetic and cellular processes that occur in space, scientists may be able to develop treatments that accomplish the same thing on earth.

"Research in space or under simulated microgravity using ground-based facilities helps us in many ways to understand the complex processes of life and this study is the first step toward the understanding of the mechanisms of cancer growth inhibition in microgravity," said Daniela Gabriele Grimm, M.D., a researcher involved in the work from the Department of Biomedicine, Pharmacology at Aarhus University in Aarhus, Denmark. "Ultimately, we hope to find new cellular targets, leading to the development of new anti-cancer drugs which might help to treat those tumors that prove to be non-responsive to the currently employed agents."

To make their discovery, Grimm and colleagues used the Science in Microgravity Box (SIMBOX) experimental facility aboard Shenzhou-8, which was launched on October 31, 2011. Cell feeding was automatically performed in space on day five and automated cell fixation was conducted on day 10. Inflight control was achieved by using a centrifuge in space. On November 17, 2011, Shenzhou-8 landed and the experimental samples were analyzed. Additional cells were analyzed using a random positioning machine which aims to achieve simulated microgravity conditions on the ground by rotating a sample around two axes operated in a random real direction mode. Both cell types were investigated with respect to their gene expression and secretion profiles, employing modern molecular biological techniques, such as whole genome microarrays and multi-analyte profiling. Results suggested that the expression of genes indicating a high malignancy in cancer cells may be down-regulated under altered gravitational stimulation.

"We are just at the beginning of a new field of medicine that studies the effects of microgravity on cell and molecular pathology. Space flight affects our bodies, both for good and bad," said Gerald Weissmann, M.D., Editor-in-Chief of The FASEB Journal. "We've known that microgravity can cause some microorganisms to become more virulent and that prolonged microgravity has negative effects on the human body. Now, we learn that it's not all bad news: what we learn from cells in space should help us understand and treat malignant tumors on the ground."


'/>"/>

Contact: Cody Mooneyhan
cmooneyhan@faseb.org
301-634-7104
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Scientists find genetic mechanism linking aging to specific diets
2. University of Hawaii scientists make a big splash
3. Plant scientists unravel a molecular switch to stimulate leaf growth
4. Scientists reveal why life got big in the Earths early oceans
5. Johns Hopkins scientists identify a key to bodys use of free calcium
6. Scripps Florida scientists offer new insight into neuron changes brought about by aging
7. Spider silk ties scientists up in knots
8. York scientists investigate the fiber of our being
9. Scientists warn: Conservation work in zoos is too random
10. Scientists develop promising drug candidates for pain, addiction
11. Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation grants prestigious awards to 20 top young scientists
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/23/2017)... Research and Markets has announced the addition ... - Industry Forecast to 2025" report to their offering. ... The Global Vehicle ... around 8.8% over the next decade to reach approximately $14.21 billion ... estimates and forecasts for all the given segments on global as ...
(Date:3/20/2017)... Pa. , March 20, 2017 PMD ... 2.0 personal spirometer and Wellness Management System (WMS), a ... Founded in 2010, PMD Healthcare is a Medical ... with a mission dedicated to creating innovative solutions that ... life. With that intent focus, PMD developed the first ...
(Date:3/7/2017)... -- Brandwatch , the leading social intelligence company, today announces ... to uncover insights to support its reporting, help direct future campaigns, ... leading youth charity will be using Brandwatch Analytics social listening and ... understanding of the topics and issues that are a priority for ... "Until ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:3/22/2017)... COPENHAGEN, Denmark , March 22, 2017 /PRNewswire/ ... that utilizes its innovative TransCon technology to address ... announced financial results for the full year ended ... a significant year for our company as we ... become a leading, integrated rare disease company with ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... 2017   iSpecimen ®, the marketplace ... Pathology Service (DPS), a full-service anatomic pathology reference ... United States , has joined a program offered ... (DHIN) to make human biospecimens and associated data ... program, announced in 2015 as a collaboration between iSpecimen ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... 22, 2017   Boston Biomedical , an industry ... to target cancer stemness pathways, today announced its Board ... as Chief Executive Officer, effective April 24, 2017. ... Li , M.D., FACP, who has led Boston Biomedical ... his leadership, Boston Biomedical has grown from a "garage ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... ... March 21, 2017 , ... ... To acquire information on the desired increase and/or decrease in antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity ... rapid N-glycosylation profiling of therapeutic antibodies. , To meet this demand, the ...
Breaking Biology Technology: