Navigation Links
Scientists discover bacteria that can cause bone infections
Date:10/17/2008

Scientists have discovered that a bone infection is caused by a newly described species of bacteria that is related to the tuberculosis pathogen. The discovery may help improve the diagnosis and treatment of similar infections, according to an article published in the October issue of the International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology.

Some rare genetic diseases can make patients susceptible to infections with Mycobacterium species, the bacteria that amongst other diseases, cause tuberculosis and leprosy. These patients often suffer from recurring mycobacterial infections throughout their whole lives. Because of this, researchers are trying to identify unusual species that cause disease in order to improve treatment strategies.

"We isolated an unknown species of bacteria from a 7 year old child who has a genetic immune defect," said Dr Didi Bang from Statens Serum Institut in Copenhagen, Denmark. "The infection had caused bone lesions and this is where we found the newly described bacteria."

Mycobacterial infections can be very difficult to treat. The bacteria have unique cell walls that protect them from several antibiotics. As well as being resistant to treatment, they can also survive attack with acids, alkalis and detergents. Most mycobacterial infections can be treated with antibiotics such as clarithromycin and rifamycins, but some species are becoming resistant to these antibiotics, so new drugs for treatments must be developed.

"Initial tests suggested we had found a Mycobacterium. By sequencing some of the bacterium's genes we showed that we had discovered an undescribed species," said Dr Bang. "We called the bacterium Mycobacterium arosiense. The name comes from Arosia, the Latin name of the city of Aarhus in Denmark, which is where the bacterium was first found. We showed the position of the new bacterium on the Mycobacterium family tree by sequencing genes and comparing them to related bacteria."

The new pathogen is closely related to Mycobacterium intracellulare and Mycobacterium avium, which cause a lung disease similar to tuberculosis in people, especially those with weak immune systems such as HIV patients that are immunologically suppressed. It is rod-shaped and grows slowly.

"Mycobacterium arosiense can be killed by several antibiotics in the lab, including clarithromycin and rifamycins. However, resistance to fluoroquinolones and isoniazid was observed," said Dr Bang. "Little knowledge is available on performing resistance tests on mycobacteria other than tuberculosis."

"We hope that this discovery will help doctors to diagnose similar diseases in the future and that further investigation may improve the treatment of people with similar infections."


'/>"/>

Contact: Lucy Goodchild
press@sgm.ac.uk
44-011-898-81843
Society for General Microbiology
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Scientists propose the creation of a new type of seed bank
2. EMBO honors 59 leading life scientists
3. Caltech scientists engineer supersensitive receptor, gain better understanding of dopamine system
4. Extreme nature helps scientists design nano materials
5. Forsyth scientists trigger cancer-like response from embryonic stem cells
6. Scientists trace molecular origin of proportional development
7. Sensitive nanowire disease detectors made by Yale scientists
8. Scent on demand: Hebrew University scientists enhance the scent of flowers
9. MSU scientists find new gene that helps plants beat the heat
10. Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory scientists trace a novel way cells are disrupted in cancer
11. Brookhaven scientists take off for southeastern Pacific climate study
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/29/2017)... CHICAGO , March 29, 2017  higi, the ... ecosystem in North America , today ... Partners and the acquisition of EveryMove. The new investment ... extensive set of tools to transform population health activities ... and lifestyle data. higi collects and secures ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... The Controller General of Immigration from Maldives Mr. ... have received the prestigious international IAIR Award for the most innovative ... ... Maldives Immigration ... Algeen (small picture on the right) have received the IAIR award for ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... 23, 2017 Research and Markets has announced ... & Trends - Industry Forecast to 2025" report to their ... The ... CAGR of around 8.8% over the next decade to reach approximately ... the market estimates and forecasts for all the given segments on ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/27/2017)... ... June 27, 2017 , ... ... powder activated carbon (PAC)-based materials do not have negative short- or long-term effects ... site contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) located at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard ...
(Date:6/26/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... June 26, 2017 , ... ... that Melissa Kirkegaard, the former Associate Director of Product Development R&D at Allergan ... and pharmaceutical products at both start-up and established biopharma companies, has joined the ...
(Date:6/26/2017)... ... June 26, 2017 , ... Two new members were elected ... on June 9, 2017: Jeremy Nowak, President, J Nowak Strategy and Michele Masucci, Ph.D., ... the election of Glen N. Gaulton and Kenneth L. Kring, and re-election of David ...
(Date:6/23/2017)... ... June 23, 2017 , ... Ken Hanson, a medical ... Physik Instrumente USA, have been selected as this year’s recipients of two top awards ... have been invited along with other honorees to accept their awards at a banquet ...
Breaking Biology Technology: