Navigation Links
Scientists design new drug type to kill lymphoma cells
Date:5/10/2010

Three researchers who are recipients of a collaborative grant from the Samuel Waxman Cancer Research Foundation have developed a new type of drug designed to kill non-Hodgkin lymphoma tumor cells. The breakthrough could lead to potential non-toxic therapies for cancer patients. The Foundation-funded investigators include Ari Melnick, M.D., of Weill Cornell Medical College, Alexander MacKerell, Ph.D., of the University of Maryland and Gilbert Priv, Ph.D., of the University of Toronto. The researchers, who published their findings in the April issue of Cancer Cell, have identified a drug that targets an oncogene known as BCL6.

BCL6 functions as a master regulatory protein. "It's a protein that controls the production of thousands of other genes," said Dr. Melnick, an associate professor of medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City. "Because of that, it has a very profound impact on cells and is required for lymphoma cells to survive and multiply."

BCL6 causes the majority of diffuse large B cell lymphomas, the most common form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Currently, about 60 percent of diffuse large B cell lymphomas can be cured with chemo-immunotherapy, said Dr. Melnick. "The hope is that we can improve that to a higher percent, and in the long term reduce the need for chemotherapy," he added.

Traditional cancer drugs target enzymes, which have small pockets on their surfaces that can be blocked with molecules. Until now, pharmaceutical companies have been reluctant to create drugs that target a protein like BCL6 because they function through a different mechanism involving interactions with cofactor proteins involving extensive protein surfaces. "And because the real estate covered by these interactions is so large, the drug companies have viewed these as being not druggable targets," said Dr. Melnick.

He and his colleagues were able to identify a "hot spot" on BLC6 that they predicted would play a critical role in protein interactions. They showed that their BCL6 inhibitor drug was specific to BCL6, and did not block other master regulatory proteins. The drug had powerful lymphoma killing activity and yet was non-toxic to normal tissues. "This is the first time a drug of this nature has been designed and it shows that it's not actually impossible to target factors like BCL6," he said.

Emerging data from other investigators suggests that BCL6 is important in many other tumor types, including forms of leukemia.

"The Samuel Waxman Cancer Research Foundation has always supported the collaborative work of scientists, funding innovative cancer research grants," said Samuel Waxman, M.D., the scientific director of the Foundation. "The Foundation has supported the work of Alexander MacKerell, Ari Melnick and Gilbert Priv for a number of years because we believe their work highlights the critical and important mission of our organizationthat collaboration can lead to potential effective cures."


'/>"/>

Contact: Jenny Song
jsong@waxmancancer.org
212-348-0136
Samuel Waxman Cancer Research Foundation
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. UK scientists working to help cut ID theft
2. Scientists show that mitochondrial DNA variants are linked to risk factors for type 2 diabetes
3. Comet probes reveal evidence of origin of life, scientists claim
4. Scientists link fragile X tremor/ataxia syndrome to binding protein in RNA
5. Male elephants get photo IDs from scientists
6. Scientists retrace evolution with first atomic structure of an ancient protein
7. Muscle mass: Scientists identify novel mode of transcriptional regulation during myogenesis
8. Carnegie Mellon scientists develop nanogels that enable controlled delivery of carbohydrate drugs
9. Clemson scientists shed light on molecules in living cells
10. Scientists tackle mystery mountain illness
11. T. rex quicker than Becks, say scientists
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/6/2017)... Forecasts by Product Type (EAC), Biometrics, Card-Based ... & Logistics, Government & Public Sector, Utilities / Energy ... Nuclear Power), Industrial, Retail, Business Organisation (BFSI), Hospitality & ... for a definitive report on the $27.9bn Access Control ... ...
(Date:4/3/2017)... , April 3, 2017  Data ... precision engineering platform, detected a statistically significant ... product prior to treatment and objective response ... the potential to predict whether cancer patients ... to treatment, as well as to improve ...
(Date:3/28/2017)... , March 28, 2017 ... Biometrics), Hardware (Camera, Monitors, Servers, Storage Devices), Software (Video ... and Region - Global Forecast to 2022", published by ... in 2016 and is projected to reach USD 75.64 ... 2017 and 2022. The base year considered for the ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:9/21/2017)... ... September 21, 2017 , ... Vixiar Medical ... engineering and manufacturing functions to The LaunchPort™ Accelerator at the City Garage in ... range of manufacturing and business services to its Residents. , Vixiar Medical ...
(Date:9/21/2017)... ... September 21, 2017 , ... ... portal. Each relaunch of the portal includes new features that facilitate streamlined and ... companies seek to remain at the forefront of medical advancements, they rely on ...
(Date:9/21/2017)... ... September 21, 2017 , ... When a ... the response was swift and efficient thanks to the continuing efforts of members ... up of more than 50 stakeholders, including officials from area counties and cities, ...
(Date:9/20/2017)... ... 2017 , ... The award-winning producers behind the American Farmer ... innovations aimed at helping farmers solve the problem of nitrogen loss. The upcoming ... 8:30aET on RFD-TV. Check your local listings for more info. , As ...
Breaking Biology Technology: