Navigation Links
Scientists copy the ways viruses deliver genes
Date:8/11/2011

Scientists at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) have mimicked the ways viruses infect human cells and deliver their genetic material. The research hopes to apply the approach to gene therapy a therapeutic strategy to correct defective genes such as those that cause cancer.

Gene therapy is still in its infancy, with obvious challenges around targeting damaged cells and creating corrective genes. An equally important challenge, addressed by this research, is finding ways to transport the corrective genes into the cell. This is a problem, because of the poor permeability of cell membranes.

This research describes a model peptide sequence, dubbed GeT (gene transporter), which wraps around genes, transports them through cell membranes and helps their escape from intracellular degradation traps. The process mimics the mechanisms viruses use to infect human cells.

GeT was designed to undergo differential membrane-induced folding - a process whereby the peptide changes its structure in response to only one type of membranes. This enables the peptide, and viruses, to carry genes into the cell. Interestingly, the property also makes it antibacterial and so capable of gene transfer even in bacteria-challenged environments.

To prove the concept, the researchers used GeT to transfer a synthetic gene encoding for a green fluorescent protein a protein whose fluorescence in cells can be seen and monitored using fluorescence microscopy.

The design can serve as a potential template for non-viral delivery systems and specialist treatments of genetic disorders.

This research, performed at NPL, is a part of the NPL-led international research project 'Multiscale measurements in biophysical systems', which is jointly funded by NPL and the Scottish Universities Physics Alliance.


'/>"/>

Contact: David Lewis
david@proofcommunication.com
44-845-680-1865
National Physical Laboratory
Source:Eurekalert

Page: 1

Related biology news :

1. Jefferson scientists deliver toxic genes to effectively kill pancreatic cancer cells
2. Scientists identify novel inhibitor of human microRNA
3. Argonne scientists peer into heart of compound that may detect chemical, biological weapons
4. MU scientists go green with gold, distribute environmentally friendly nanoparticles
5. Scientists identify gene that may contribute to improved rice yield
6. Scientists discover why a mothers high-fat diet contributes to obesity in her children
7. MU scientists see how HIV matures into an infection
8. Earth scientists keep an eye on Texas
9. Thinking it through: Scientists call for policy to guide biofuels industry toward sustainability
10. Scientists identify a molecule that coordinates the movement of cells
11. Scientists Find new migratory patterns for Mediterranean and Western Atlantic bluefin tuna
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:11/17/2016)... , Nov. 17, 2016  AIC announces that it has just released a ... organizations that require high-performance scale-out plus high speed data transfer storage solutions. ... ... ... Setting up a high performance ...
(Date:11/14/2016)... Nov. 14, 2016  Based on its ... Frost & Sullivan recognizes FST Biometrics with ... for Visionary Innovation Leadership. FST Biometrics emerged ... identification market by pioneering In Motion Identification ... instant, seamless, and non-invasive verification. This patented ...
(Date:6/21/2016)... Columbia , June 21, 2016 ... to the new role of principal product architect ... named the director of customer development. Both will ... chief technical officer. The moves reflect NuData,s strategic ... in response to high customer demand and customer ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:12/5/2016)... DENVER, COLORADO (PRWEB) , ... December 05, 2016 ... ... podcast series hosted by one of the nation’s premier cannabis technology and application ... the founder and CEO of Cultivate Colorado. Over the past 30 years, Chip ...
(Date:12/5/2016)... According to the new ... (Consumable, Instruments, Automated Cell Expansion System), Cells Types ... Research, Cancer, and Cell-Based Research), End-users (Biopharmaceutical and ... Revenue, Trends, Growth, Share, Size and Forecast to ... cell expansion market is expected to reach USD ...
(Date:12/5/2016)... /PRNewswire/ - Resverlogix Corp. ("Resverlogix" or the "Company") ... Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB) for the Company,s Phase ... patients has completed a second planned safety review ... planned without any modifications. The DSMB reviewed available ... efficacy concerns were identified. The DSMB will conduct ...
(Date:12/5/2016)... , Dec. 5, 2016  Eisai Inc. announced ... two-year study of rufinamide, which were presented at ... Society (AES) held from December 2-6 in ... two-year safety, tolerability and cognitive data showed that ... similar safety and tolerability profiles, cognitive development and ...
Breaking Biology Technology: