Navigation Links
Scientists' breakthrough attracts new funding for high blood pressure research
Date:6/21/2011

Scientists at the University of Strathclyde's Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, have recently been awarded almost 155,000 by the British Heart Foundation to conduct a two year investigation aimed at improving the treatment of hypertension.

Dr Debbi MacMillan and joint recipients of the award, Prof John McCarron and Dr Charles Kennedy, have identified a novel mechanism for the control of blood vessel constriction, essential in blood pressure regulation, which may lead to the development of new treatments for high blood pressure.

The researchers have identified a heretofore unrecognised pathway which regulates calcium activity within the smooth muscle of the blood vessel wall, to control constriction and dilation of blood vessels. The constriction and dilation of the muscular walls of blood vessels is controlled by calcium, which regulates blood flow through the vessels and thus blood pressure within the vessels. Yet, until now, a mechanism whereby calcium is regulated by the purinergic drug, ATP, has not been recognised.

This study will investigate the process by which ATP modifies calcium to regulate the constriction and dilation of blood vessels and how this may be altered in disease.

The new 36M building where Dr MacMillan is based is due to be officially opened later in 2011 as part of the world-class Institute at the University of Strathclyde for the discovery and development of new drugs to treat global diseases. An 8M fundraising campaign for the new drug development facility has attracted significant philanthropic support from Charities, Trusts and Strathclyde alumni resulting in 7M raised to date with additional donors still required. http://www.strath.ac.uk/alumni/healthclub/

The lead investigator, Dr MacMillan, said, "I am delighted that we have received funding from the British Heart Foundation. This prestigious award will enable us to gain a better understanding of the normal physiology of smooth muscle and how it might be changed in disease conditions, to provide better informed treatment, which leads to better management of the disease.

"Our findings will undoubtedly present new opportunities for the development of new drugs for treating vascular disorders."

Despite advances in medication targeting against hypertension, the underlying cause of the disease remains unclear and current medication is limited in achieving effective blood pressure control. A contributing factor is a poor understanding of the normal regulation of blood pressure and alterations which occur in the hypertensive patient. Key to understanding blood pressure control is an appreciation of smooth muscle, which is present within the walls of a number of organs in the body including blood vessels.

It is hoped that effective drug therapy to treat the underlying cause of the disease may avoid the need for long-term anti-hypertensive medicines.


'/>"/>

Contact: Corporate Comms
corporatecomms@strath.ac.uk
University of Strathclyde
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. Jefferson scientists deliver toxic genes to effectively kill pancreatic cancer cells
2. Scientists identify novel inhibitor of human microRNA
3. Argonne scientists peer into heart of compound that may detect chemical, biological weapons
4. MU scientists go green with gold, distribute environmentally friendly nanoparticles
5. Scientists identify gene that may contribute to improved rice yield
6. Scientists discover why a mothers high-fat diet contributes to obesity in her children
7. MU scientists see how HIV matures into an infection
8. Earth scientists keep an eye on Texas
9. Thinking it through: Scientists call for policy to guide biofuels industry toward sustainability
10. Scientists identify a molecule that coordinates the movement of cells
11. Scientists Find new migratory patterns for Mediterranean and Western Atlantic bluefin tuna
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Scientists' breakthrough attracts new funding for high blood pressure research 
(Date:2/14/2017)... WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. , Feb. 14, 2017  Wake ... FRY-shlog), M.D., as its new chief executive officer (CEO). ... succeeds CEO John D. McConnell , M.D., who ... new position at the Medical Center, after leading it ... oversee the full scope of Wake Forest Baptist,s academic ...
(Date:2/8/2017)... , Feb. 8, 2017 About Voice ... voice to match it against a stored voiceprint ... as pitch, cadence, and tone are compared to ... minimal hardware installation, as most PCs already have ... different transactions. Voice recognition biometrics are most likely ...
(Date:2/7/2017)... --  MedNet Solutions , an innovative SaaS-based eClinical technology ... is pleased to announce that the latest release of ... and award winning eClinical solution, is now available for ... a proven Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) clinical research technology platform that ... delivers an entire suite of eClinical tools to support ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:2/22/2017)... ... February 22, 2017 , ... ... of Tom Perkins as European director. Operating from Pennside’s Zurich headquarters, Pennside Partners, ... , Perkins joins Pennside after more than a decade with leading market research ...
(Date:2/22/2017)... SILVER SPRING, Md. and RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, N.C., ... UTHR ) today announced its financial results ... 2016. "Our annual 2016 financial results ... billion and earnings exceeded $700 million," said Martine ... Officer. "These financial results strengthen our ability to ...
(Date:2/21/2017)... Inc. ("SQI" or the "Company") (TSX-V: SQD; OTCQX: SQIDF), today reported ... December 31, 2016. SQI is a ... develops and commercializes proprietary technologies and products for advanced multiplexed ... ... in fiscal 2016," said Andrew Morris , SQI,s President ...
(Date:2/21/2017)... ... February 21, 2017 , ... Vortex ... , a fully automated benchtop system for collecting intact circulating tumor cells (CTCs) ... at the Molecular Medicine Tri Conference (Tri-Con) Annual Meeting 2017 (February 19–24 San ...
Breaking Biology Technology: