Navigation Links
Rutgers-Camden developing enzyme function database

CAMDEN Since the advent of the Human Genome Project an explosion of data has sent the science world scrambling. There is a growing demand to fine-tune genomic codes, which list the "ingredients for life," but do not adequately explain how those ingredients function.

A Rutgers UniversityCamden biochemist is addressing this knowledge gap through the creation of a database for quick "background checks" on all known enzyme functions.

Thanks to a National Institute of Health grant, Peter Palenchar, an assistant professor of chemistry at RutgersCamden, will categorize decades-worth of scholarship on enzymes into a database, beginning with those that bind to molecules that contain adenosine.

The $201,339 grant will allow Palenchar to track and simplify what has been written about some 130 enzymes, including energy-creators adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP).

"There are 50-plus years of good data on how enzymes function, but it's a tedious process to understand the specialized language used in enzymology papers. Question is: how do you access that information quickly?" says Palenchar.

His goal is to create a standard vocabulary to describe how enzymes function for the biomedical community, especially those who work with anticancer drugs that target enzymes.

Palenchar, with assistance from RutgersCamden undergraduate Jason Cargill and graduate student Salvador Gomez, will not only establish this new vocabulary for an accessible database, but test its effectiveness in determining the accuracy of genomic codes.

To do this, the RutgersCamden research team will compare the genomic sequencing in two organisms that contain "functionally important" amino acids: A. thaliana, a plant commonly known as thale cress, and P. falciparum, the pathogen which causes malaria.

"There could be good evidence that these enzymes are doing something different," notes the biochemist, who has published his research in the journal Genome Biology.

According to Gomez, who is souring primary publications through online databases like PubMed and Academic Search Premier, this research has been more than just a resume builder.

"This research has given me an opportunity to do meaningful work at a higher level," notes the Shamong, N.J. resident. "Knowing my work will be utilized by other scientists is a great feeling."


Contact: Cathy Donovan
Rutgers University

Related biology news :

1. Evolution and climate change research advances at Rutgers-Camden
2. Better protection for biomedial devices could result from Rutgers-Camden research
3. Study: Smoking may worsen malnutrition in developing nations
4. Increased climate volatility expected to worsen poverty vulnerability in developing countries
5. Inherited risk factors increase odds of developing childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia
6. Ben-Gurion U. developing new computer techniques to analyze historic Hebrew and Arabic documents
7. Scientists track impact of DNA damage in the developing brain
8. Scientists closer to developing salt-tolerant crops
9. Sugar, spice and puppy dog tails: Developing sex-typed personality traits and interests
10. Nutrigenomics -- developing personalized diets for disease prevention -- part 2 just published in OMICS
11. Iowa State researchers developing clean, renewable energy for ethanol industry
Post Your Comments:
(Date:11/17/2015)...  Vigilant Solutions announces today that Mr. Dick ... --> --> Mr. ... partnership at TPG Capital, one of the largest global ... in revenue.  He founded and led TPG,s Operating Group, ... from 1997 to 2013.  In his first role, he ...
(Date:11/12/2015)...  Arxspan has entered into an agreement with ... use of its ArxLab cloud-based suite of biological ... will support the institute,s efforts to electronically manage ... internally and with external collaborators. The ArxLab suite ... Institute,s electronic laboratory notebook, compound and assay registration, ...
(Date:11/10/2015)... NEW YORK , Nov. 10, 2015 /PRNewswire/ ... refers to behavioral biometrics that helps to identify ... prevent fraud. Signature is considered as the secure ... for the identification of a particular individual because ... offers more accurate results especially when dynamic signature ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... November 24, 2015 , ... The United States Golf Association ... 2016 USGA Green Section Award. Presented annually since 1961, the USGA Green Section Award ... work with turfgrass. , Clarke, of Iselin, N.J., is an extension specialist ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... , Nov. 24, 2015 /CNW/ - iCo Therapeutics ... today reported financial results for the quarter ended ... expressed in Canadian dollars and presented under International ... United States ," said Andrew Rae ... advancements regarding iCo-008 are not only value enriching ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... , Nov. 24, 2015 /PRNewswire/ - Aeterna Zentaris Inc. ... IIROC on behalf of the Toronto Stock Exchange, confirms ... there are no corporate developments that would cause the ... --> --> About Aeterna Zentaris ... . --> Aeterna Zentaris is a specialty ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... 24, 2015 , ... This fall, global software solutions leader SAP and AdVenture ... develop and pitch their BIG ideas to improve health and wellness in their schools. ... to win the title of SAP's Teen Innovator, an all-expenses paid trip to Super ...
Breaking Biology Technology: