Navigation Links
Rhodopsin phototrophy promotes bacterial survival
Date:4/27/2010

Bacteria in the ocean can harvest light energy from sunlight to promote survival thanks to a unique photoprotein. This novel finding by a team of scientists in Sweden and Spain is to be published next week in the online, open access journal PLoS Biology.

"It was long thought that phytoplankton were the only organisms in the sea that could harvest the energy from sunlight for growth," says Dr. Jarone Pinhassi, scientist in marine microbiology at Linnaeus University, Sweden. These microscopic planktonic organisms carry out the same chlorophyll driven photosynthesis process as green plants on land.

In 2000, American scientists discovered that many marine bacteria contain a gene in their genome that encodes a new kind of light-harvesting pigment: proteorhodopsin. Proteorhodopsin is related to the pigment in the retina that enables human vision in less intense light. Now, a decade later, the first direct evidence for the functioning of proteorhodopsin in native marine bacteria is presented, based on mutational analysis in a marine bacterium. At the same time the present study shows that proteorhodopsin-mediated phototrophy (the process of acquiring energy from light) allows marine bacteria to better survive periods of starvation in an often nutrient-depleted ocean.

The importance of understanding novel mechanisms for marine bacteria to efficiently use solar energy is obvious if one considers that a liter of seawater on average contains around a billion bacteria, many of which contain proteorhodopsin. The activity of these bacteria play a crucial role in the global carbon cycle by determining oceanic production of CO2 through respiration and determining how the fluxes of energy that are fixed by photosynthesis are channeled through marine food chains.

"Bacteria in the surface ocean are swimming in a sea of light, and it may not be all that surprising that evolution has favored microorganisms that can use this abundant energy source," says Pinhassi.


'/>"/>

Contact: Dr. Jarone Pinhassi
jarone.pinhassi@lnu.se
Public Library of Science
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Synthetic compound promotes death of lung-cancer cells, tumors
2. Iridescence workshop promotes natures nanotechnology
3. Cellular self-eating promotes pancreatitis
4. Dense tissue promotes aggressive cancers
5. Advancement in tissue engineering promotes oral wound healing
6. Prairie dog research promotes caring, conservation
7. Protein that promotes cancer cell growth identified
8. New Web site promotes interoperable newborn screening data
9. Newly identified growth factor promotes stem cell growth, regeneration
10. Legionnaires bacterial proteins work together to survive
11. Scripps research team blocks bacterial communication system to prevent deadly staph infections
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:1/18/2016)... , Jan. 18, 2016  Extenua Inc., a ... simplifies the use and access of ubiquitous on-premise ... partnership with American Cyber.  ... experience leading transformational C4ISR and Cyber initiatives in ... the latest proven technology solutions," said Steve ...
(Date:1/11/2016)... 2016 Synaptics Incorporated (NASDAQ: SYNA ), ... that its ClearPad ® TouchView ™ 4300 ... separate categories in the 8 th Annual Mobile ... Breakthrough. The Synaptics ® TDDI solution enables faster ... thinner devices, brighter displays and borderless designs. ...
(Date:1/7/2016)... YORK , Jan. 7, 2016 This ... regional markets for biometric technologies and devices, identifying newer ... market for various types of biometric devices. Includes forecast ... to: Identify newer markets and explore the expansion ... biometric devices. Examine each type of biometric technology, determine ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:2/3/2016)... N.J. , Feb. 3, 2016 ... totaling more than $1 million for researchers in ... working on health-related research that demonstrates exciting potential. ... round of funding for the New Jersey Health Foundation ... faculty members at these educational institutions— Princeton University, ...
(Date:2/3/2016)... ... 03, 2016 , ... ProMIS Neurosciences is currently in the ... misfolded, propagating strains of Amyloid beta involved in Alzheimer’s disease. The Company plans ... Following on from the first misfolded Amyloid beta target announced on Nov. 12, ...
(Date:2/3/2016)... ... 03, 2016 , ... Resilinc released online today ... nearly 750 unique supply chain notifications and alerts generated by its EventWatch ... risk management practitioners subscribe to the EventWatch service to receive early warnings and ...
(Date:2/3/2016)... Feb. 3, 2016  Today, Symphony Technology Group (STG) ... , a leading provider of primary research and analytics-based ... IMS Health , a global information and technology services ... and technologies will be integrated into IMS Health to ... market research capabilities. ...
Breaking Biology Technology: