Navigation Links
Researchers unlock the potential for exploring kidney regeneration
Date:2/1/2011

Boston, MA - It is estimated that up to 10 percent of the U.S. population may have some form of renal disease, with 450,000 patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) requiring hemodialysis. Researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital, Massachusetts General Hospital and the University of Pittsburgh have identified a cell in zebrafish that can be transplanted from one fish to another to regenerate nephrons, providing the potential to improve kidney function. These findings are published in the February 3 edition of Nature.

Currently, the five-year survival rate for patients on dialysis is 33 percent, worse than the survival rate for many forms of cancer. This epidemic of renal failure is projected to grow as obesity, poor nutrition and lack of exercise increase the incidence of diabetes and hypertension. There is also evidence that intra-uterine growth retardation and low birth weight/prematurity reduce the number of nephrons in each kidney thereby increasing the risk of hypertension and renal failure when these premature infants become adults. The cost of treating end stage renal disease is currently 32 billion dollars annually and is likely to double in the next decade.

One of the reasons renal failure is so common, is that humans are unable to generate any new nephrons, the basic filtration unit of the kidney, after the 36th week of gestation. In contrast, many non-mammalian vertebrates continue to generate nephrons throughout their lives and can generate new nephrons following renal injury. Understanding how non-mammalian vertebrates like zebrafish, carry out this remarkable regenerative process and why mammals have lost this ability is a fundamental biologic question. We believe that answering this question might provide new ways to repair damaged human kidneys and dramatically extend and improve the lives of hundreds of thousands of patients with chronic renal failure.

In a collaborative effort including two groups that are part of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute, the laboratory of Dr. Alan Davidson, at the Center for Regenerative Medicine at the Massachusetts General Hospital and the laboratory of Dr. Robert Handin, in the Hematology Division in the Department of Medicine at the Brigham and Woman's Hospital, together with Dr. Neil Hukriede's team at the University of Pittsburgh, have identified and characterized, for the first time, a progenitor cell in adult zebrafish kidneys that can be transplanted from one fish to another and generate new nephrons. Now that this cell has been identified it may be possible to better understand how to increase its number and capacity to generate nephrons.

Lead author, Dr. Alan Davidson, said "We hope to eventually be able to cross species barriers and understand why similar cells, present in mouse and human kidneys during embryonic life, disappear around the time of birth". The groups plan to continue studies on zebrafish and apply their data to mouse models and eventually humans.


'/>"/>

Contact: Holly Brown-Ayers
hbrown-ayers@partners.org
617-534-1603
Brigham and Women's Hospital
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Researchers bust bat rabies stereotype
2. Salk researchers discover that stem cell marker regulates synapse formation
3. Cold cases gone hot: Montreal researchers solve decades-old medical mysteries using genetics
4. Researchers identify biomarkers of poor outcomes in preemies
5. Researchers register new species using DNA-based description
6. Nearly 10 million euros ($13.6 million) in ERC grants for 6 Technische Universitaet Muenchen researchers
7. Climate change threatens many tree species, say Hebrew U. researchers
8. Researchers find smoking gun of worlds biggest extinction
9. 2 bacterial enzymes confer resistanceto common herbicide, say MU researchers
10. Go figure: Math model may help researchers with stem cell, cancer therapies
11. Researchers discover giant crayfish species right under their noses
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/8/2017)... Report Highlights ... The global synthetic-biology market reached nearly $3.9 billion in ... a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 24.0% through 2021. ... for synthetic biology. - Analyses of global market trends, with ... annual growth rates (CAGRs) through 2021. - Coverage of core ...
(Date:2/7/2017)... New York , February 7, 2017 ... as ID Global Solutions Corporation [OTC: IDGS], ("Ipsidy" or ... management and electronic transaction processing services, is pleased to ... of the Company. Effective January 31, 2017, ... the Board of Directors, CEO and President.  An experienced ...
(Date:2/2/2017)... Feb. 2, 2017  EyeLock LLC, a market leader ... white paper " What You Should Know About Biometrics ... ensuring user authenticity is a growing concern. In traditional ... users. However, traditional authentication schemes such as username/password suffer ... Biometric authentication offers an elegant solution to the problem ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:2/18/2017)... 18, 2017 Kurzlehrgang mit ... adoptiven Zelltherapie-Studien, Poster legt metaproteomische Analyse des Darm-Mikrobioms bei ... ... wird Dr. Yoav Peretz , Scientific Director bei ... von Assays zum Nachweis intrazellulärer Zytokine bei adoptiven Zelltherapie-Studien ...
(Date:2/17/2017)... 17, 2017  BioGenex, a global leader in ... a novel system for quantitative immunohistochemistry (IHC). The ... of Rochester (NY, USA) and Konica-Minolta Inc. ( ... is able to accurately quantify the expression of ... growth factor receptor-2) in clinical samples. Quantitative IHC ...
(Date:2/16/2017)... ... February 16, 2017 , ... Avomeen & MichBio will be hosting ... be held at Avomeen Analytical Services (4840 Venture Dr., Ann Arbor, Michigan 48108). ... provide an opportunity to interact with peers, make new connections and talk bio biz. ...
(Date:2/16/2017)... Research and Markets has announced the addition ... to their offering. ... The study scope includes ... chassis organisms, synthetic cells, production systems), enabling technologies (DNA ... specialty media) and enabled technologies (biofuels, chemicals, pharmaceuticals, agriculture) ...
Breaking Biology Technology: