Navigation Links
Researchers to reveal aging's origins on global stage
Date:6/23/2009

Four of the biologists who described the underlying causes of aging will soon share their findings with an international audience during a symposium at the upcoming World Congress of Gerontology and Geriatrics, taking place from July 5-9, 2009, in Paris, France.

The presentation, titled "Ageing Is no Longer an Unsolved Problem," is being supported by the Ellison Medical Foundation and co-sponsored by The Gerontological Society of America (GSA).

Among the speakers will be former GSA President Leonard Hayflick, PhD, a professor of anatomy at the University of California, San Francisco. He said that the accumulation of new insights has made it possible, for the first time, to understand the biological reasons for the aging of animals and humans.

"Aging occurs because the complex biological molecules of which we are all composed become dysfunctional over time as the energy necessary to keep them structurally sound diminishes. Thus, our molecules must be repaired or replaced frequently by our own extensive repair systems," Hayflick said.

"These repair systems, which are also composed of complex molecules," he explained, "eventually suffer the same molecular dysfunction. The time when the balance shifts in favor of the accumulation of dysfunctional molecules is determined by natural selection and leads to the manifestation of age changes that we recognize are characteristic of an old person or animal. It must occur after both reach reproductive maturity, otherwise the species would vanish."

Hayflick also noted that these repair and maintenance systems are called "determinants of longevity," which is a phenomenon different from the aging process itself.

"These fundamental molecular dysfunctional events lead to an increase in vulnerability to age-associated disease," he said. "Therefore, the study, and even the resolution of age-associated diseases, will tell us little about the fundamental processes of aging."

Hayflick's discoveries described in his book, "How and Why We Age" have been reinforced by several other leading biologists, who will join him at the Paris symposium.

These co-presenters include Robin Holliday, PhD, of the Australian Academy of Science, author of "Understanding Ageing"; Steven Austad, PhD, of the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, author of "Why We Age"; and Thomas Kirkwood, PhD, of Newcastle University, author of "Time of Our Lives."


'/>"/>

Contact: Todd Kluss
tkluss@geron.org
202-587-2839
The Gerontological Society of America
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Researchers observe single protein dimers wavering between two symmetrically opposed structures
2. Caltech researchers explore how cells reconcile mixed messages in decisions about growth
3. UC Davis researchers visualize formation of a new synapse
4. UBC researchers develop new method to study gambling addictions
5. UCLA cancer researchers develop model that may help identify cancer stem cells
6. Researchers from around the globe coming to K-State June 21 for workshop on Fusarium fungus
7. Duke, Harvard researchers to monitor bonobo reintroduction
8. Rice University researchers ask if biofuels will lead to a drink or drive
9. Aussie and Kiwi researchers make double MS genetic discovery
10. Researchers describe implausible chemistry that produces herbicidal compound
11. Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona researchers first to clone mice in Spain
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:1/4/2017)... 4, 2017  CES 2017 – Valencell , ... today announced the launch of two new versions ... highly-accurate biometric sensor modules that incorporate the best ... and expertise. The two new designs include Benchmark ... hearables, and Benchmark BW2.0, a 2-LED version of ...
(Date:12/20/2016)... -- The rising popularity of mobility services such ... significant interest in keyless access systems. Following the ... (BLE), biometrics and near-field communication (NFC) are poised ... technologies in the automotive industry. This evolution from ... opens the market to specialist companies such as ...
(Date:12/16/2016)... Research and Markets has announced the addition of the ... report to their offering. ... The biometric vehicle access system market, in terms ... from 2016 to 2021. The market is estimated to be USD ... by 2021. The growth of the biometric vehicle access system market ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:1/21/2017)... Jan. 21, 2017   Boston Biomedical , an ... to target cancer stemness pathways, today presented data from ... at the 2017 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) ... . In a Phase Ib/II study ... to inhibit cancer stemness pathways by targeting STAT3 – ...
(Date:1/20/2017)... , Jan. 20, 2017 Ginkgo ... of Gen9, a pioneer in the synthesis and ... unique expertise in assembling pathway-length synthetic DNA into ... and capacity in the construction of new organism ... industries. "Gen9 was founded to significantly ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... 19, 2017 Research and Markets has announced ... Biomolecules, Cancer Type, Application - Global Opportunity Analysis and Industry Forecast, ... ... global market is projected to reach $15,737 million by 2022 from ... to 2022. Omic technologies segment accounted for more ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... 19, 2017 /PRNewswire -- WuXi AppTec, a leading ... and technology platform, today announced that it has ... preclinical drug discovery contract research organization (CRO). After ... wholly-owned subsidiary of WuXi, and will continue to ... greater services. The acquisition will further strengthen WuXi,s ...
Breaking Biology Technology: