Navigation Links
Researchers share insights into RNA
Date:5/11/2010

LA JOLLA, Calif., May 11, 2010 -- Investigators from around the country came to Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute (Sanford-Burnham) on Friday, May 7, to share their knowledge of the burgeoning young field of microRNAs. These small non-coding nucleic acids turn off proteins and have been implicated in viral infection, cancer, cardiovascular disease, HIV and numerous other conditions.

"The discovery that small RNAs could shut down gene expression was revolutionary," said Tariq Rana, Ph.D., who directs the RNA Biology program at Sanford-Burnham. Dr. Rana organized the symposium with Sanford-Burnham colleagues Rolf Bodmer, Ph.D., and Sumit Chanda, Ph.D.

The symposium, entitled RNAi and microRNA Regulatory Functions, featured a who's who of RNA biologists sharing their understanding of how these small RNAs regulate gene function and contribute to disease.

One of the speakers, Shiv Grewal, Ph.D., senior investigator at the National Cancer Institute, works to understand how RNAi regulates chromatin, the combination of proteins and DNA that makes up chromosomes. Dr. Grewal's research has shown that RNAi machinery stabilizes these critical structures. "If you disrupt this process, chromosomes will not segregate properly," said Dr. Grewal. "After cell division, one cell will get more and the other will get less, a very common feature in cancer cells."

Deepak Srivastava, M.D., a pediatric cardiologist and director of the Gladstone Institute of Cardiovascular Disease, has been working to understand how the heart develops. His research has shown that microRNAs and proteins work in complementary networks to help progenitor cells choose what kind of heart cells to become. "There is a transcriptional network that controls cell fate decisions in the heart," said Dr. Srivastava. "Overlaid on that is a translational network controlled by microRNAs that controls how much protein is made of those same transcription factors. But also, those transcription factors control the dose of microRNAs. It's a very coordinated network."

Amy Pasquinelli, Ph.D., associate professor at UC, San Diego, is working to determine how microRNAs bind to their target. "We want to understand the pairing rules," said Dr. Pasquinelli. "If we can understand those, we can use bioinformatics to predict, simply by looking at the microRNA sequence, where it's going to bind, what gene it will target and what will be the ultimate result."

Other researchers shared their work on a number of topics, including the fundamental roles of microRNAs in biology and epigenetics; developing cutting-edge technologies that use small RNAs to investigate disease processes; high-resolution structures of RNAi machinery; RNA-mediated regulation of herpes infections; and RNA-based treatments for neurodegenerative disorders, AIDS, cancer and metabolic diseases.


'/>"/>

Contact: Josh Baxt
jbaxt@sanfordburnham.org
858-795-5236
Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Researchers identify proteins involved in new neurodegenerative syndrome
2. Texas researchers and educators head for Antarctica
3. MGH researchers describe new way to identify, evolve novel enzymes
4. University of Pennsylvania researchers develop formula to gauge risk of disease clusters
5. U of MN researchers discover noninvasive diagnostic tool for brain diseases
6. U of Minnesota researchers discover noninvasive diagnostic tool for brain diseases
7. Researchers discover new strategies for antibiotic resistance
8. Researchers find new taste in fruit flies: carbonated water
9. Binghamton University researchers investigate evolving malaria resistance
10. UIC researchers find promising new targets for antibiotics
11. Researchers develop simple method to create natural drug products
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/23/2017)... -- Research and Markets has announced the addition of ... Industry Forecast to 2025" report to their offering. ... The Global Vehicle Anti-Theft ... 8.8% over the next decade to reach approximately $14.21 billion by ... and forecasts for all the given segments on global as well ...
(Date:3/20/2017)... ALLENTOWN, Pa. , March 20, 2017 ... PD 2.0 personal spirometer and Wellness Management System (WMS), ... Founded in 2010, PMD Healthcare is a ... Company with a mission dedicated to creating innovative solutions ... of life. With that intent focus, PMD developed the ...
(Date:3/7/2017)... , March 7, 2017 Brandwatch , the ... by The Prince,s Trust to uncover insights to support ... The Trust. The UK,s leading youth charity will be ... campaign results and get a better understanding of the topics and ... ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:4/20/2017)... Linda, Ca (PRWEB) , ... April 20, 2017 ... ... University Virtual Event , this new webinar will explore challenging patient cases when ... admitted to the hospital, there may be a need for bridging parental anticoagulation ...
(Date:4/20/2017)...  Eli Lilly and Company (NYSE: LLY ... the prevention of migraine at the American Academy of ... 22-28, 2017, in Boston . ... including safety and patient outcomes data for galcanezumab in ... in monthly migraine headache days among patients with episodic ...
(Date:4/20/2017)... ... April 20, 2017 , ... ... scientific and clinical research community’s growing body of knowledge during its Eighth ... Gracie Theatre and the adjacent Darling Atrium. During the event, undergraduates, graduate students, ...
(Date:4/20/2017)... LAVAL, QC , April 20, 2017 /PRNewswire/ - Prometic Life ... today presented new results at the International Liver Congress ("ILC") ... Liver ("EASL") in Amsterdam on the ... in a mouse model of obesity and metabolic syndrome. ... According to Dr. Lyne Gagnon, ...
Breaking Biology Technology: