Navigation Links
Researchers receive $12.6 million NIH grant to study genetics of Alzheimer's
Date:7/7/2014

NEW YORK, NY (June 7, 2014) Researchers from Columbia University's Taub Institute for Research on Alzheimer's Disease and the Aging Brain and Departments of Neurology, Epidemiology, and Systems Biology are part of a five-university collaboration receiving a $12.6 million, four-year grant from the National Institute on Aging (NIA), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), to identify rare genetic variants that may either protect against, or contribute to Alzheimer's disease risk.

At Columbia, the Consortium for Alzheimer's Sequence Analysis (CASA), is led by principal investigator Richard Mayeux, MD, MSc, chair of neurology and the Gertrude H. Sergievesky Professor of Neurology, Psychiatry and Epidemiology at Columbia University Medical Center. Other Columbia co-investigators include Christiane Reitz, MD, PhD, assistant professor of neurology at the Taub Institute, and Badri Vardarajan, PhD, an assistant professor of bioinformatics in the Departments of Neurology and Systems Biology.

CASA investigators will analyze whole exome and whole genome sequence data generated during the first phase of the NIH Alzheimer's Disease Sequencing Program, an innovative collaboration that began in 2012 between NIA and the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), also part of NIH. They will analyze data from 6,000 volunteers with Alzheimer disease and 5,000 older individuals who did not have the disease. In addition, they will study genomic data from 111 large families with multiple Alzheimer disease members, mostly of Caucasian and Caribbean Hispanic descent to identify rare genetic variants.

"Identifying variants in genes related to Alzheimer's disease will enable the CASA team to search for therapeutic targets that might one day reduce the economic and human burden caused by this devastating disease," said Dr. Mayeux. "This is an exciting opportunity to apply new genomic analyses and technologies to improve our understanding of the biological pathways underlying this disease."

Alzheimer's disease, a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, has become an epidemic that currently affects as many as five million people age 65 and older in the United States, with economic costs that are comparable to, if not greater than, caring for those of heart disease or cancer. Available drugs only marginally affect disease severity and progression. While there is no way to prevent this disease, the discovery of genetic risk factors for Alzheimer's is bringing researchers closer to learning how the genes work together and may help identify the most effective interventions.

This effort is critical to accomplishing the genetic research goals outlined in the National Plan to Address Alzheimer's Disease, first announced by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in May 2012 and updated annually. Developed under the National Alzheimer's Project Act, the Plan provides a framework for a coordinated and concentrated effort in research, care, and services for Alzheimer's and related dementias. Its primary research goal is to prevent and effectively treat Alzheimer's disease by 2025.

With the current award, CASA joins the NHGRI Large-Scale Sequencing and Analysis Centers program, an NIH-supported consortium that provides large-scale sequence datasets and analysis to the biomedical community. CASA researchers will facilitate the analyses of all Alzheimer's Disease Sequencing Project (ADSP) and additional non-ADSP sequence data to detect protective and risk variants for Alzheimer disease.

"We are delighted to support the important research being accomplished under this broad-based, collaborative effort. A team effort is vital to advancing a deeper understanding of the genetic variants involved in this complex and devastating disease and to the shared goal of finding targets for effective interventions," said NIH Director Francis Collins.

"This grant, which represents major support for the critical field of Alzheimer's research, underlines the collaborative nature of science," said Lee Goldman, MD, MPH, the Harold and Margaret Hatch Professor of the University and dean of the faculties of health sciences and medicine at Columbia. "It could help lead to the preventive and therapeutic advances that patients and families so desperately await."

CASA is a collaboration of Columbia and four other American universities. Jonathan Haines, PhD will lead the project at Case Western Reserve University, Richard Mayeux, MD at Columbia University, Margaret Pericak-Vance, PhD, at the University of Miami, and Gerard D. Schellenberg, PhD, at the University of Pennsylvania, and Lindsay Farrar, PhD at Boston University.

This research is supported by the NIA grant (UF1-AG047133).


'/>"/>

Contact: Karin Eskenazi
ket2116@cumc.columbia.edu
212-342-0508
Columbia University Medical Center
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Researchers uncover new knowledge about our intestines
2. SDSC assists researchers in novel wildlife tracking project
3. Deforestation remedies can have unintended consequences, UF researchers say
4. Using geometry, researchers coax human embryonic stem cells to organize themselves
5. NIH-funded researchers extend liver preservation for transplantation
6. CNIO researchers discover more than 40 melanoma-specific genes that determine aggressiveness
7. Researchers discover Trojan Horse method of penetrating cellular walls without harm
8. People with tinnitus process emotions differently from their peers, researchers report
9. LSTM Researchers demonstrate adaptive potential of hybridization in mosquito species
10. CU-Boulder, NCAR researchers seek to reduce deadly air pollution from cooking emissions
11. BUSM researchers investigating ways to improve type 2 diabetes treatments
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:1/21/2016)... --> ... report "Emotion Detection and Recognition Market by Technology (Bio-Sensors, NLP, ... Voice Recognition and Others), Services, Application Areas, End ... published by MarketsandMarkets, the global Emotion Detection and ... Billion by 2020, at a CAGR of 31.9%, ...
(Date:1/18/2016)... SAN JOSE, Calif. , Jan. 18, 2016 ... storage security software that simplifies the use and ... a technology and go-to-market partnership with American Cyber.  ... "American Cyber brings extensive experience leading transformational C4ISR ... missions implementing and integrating the latest proven technology ...
(Date:1/11/2016)... 11, 2016 Synaptics Incorporated (NASDAQ: SYNA ... announced that its ClearPad ® TouchView ™ ... two separate categories in the 8 th Annual ... Technology Breakthrough. The Synaptics ® TDDI solution enables ... chain, thinner devices, brighter displays and borderless designs. ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:2/10/2016)... ASAE is introducing a hybrid membership model ... the option of joining or renewing through an organizational ... staff size, every employee in any size association or ... all available member benefits.   John H. ... options will allow organizations of any size and their ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... , Feb. 10, 2016  Allergan plc (NYSE: ... announced that Brent Saunders , Allergan,s CEO and ... a fireside chat session at the RBC Capital Markets ... p.m. ET at The New York Palace Hotel in ... will be webcast live and can be accessed on ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... ... February 10, 2016 , ... HOLLOWAY AMERICA, ... Pharmaceutical Engineering (ISPE) Rocky Mountain Chapter 21st Annual Vendor Exhibition on Thursday, February ... than 100 tables for its annual event, which will run from 3:00 p.m. ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... Mateo, CA (PRWEB) , ... February 10, 2016 ... ... of Multiplex Testing (PROMPT), a research registry built on the secure online PatientCrossroads ... September 2014. More than 1,600 participants have joined the PROMPT study, which seeks ...
Breaking Biology Technology: