Navigation Links
Researchers find key to saving the world's lakes
Date:7/21/2008

After completing one of the longest running experiments ever done on a lake, researchers from the University of Alberta, University of Minnesota and the Freshwater Institute, contend that nitrogen control, in which the European Union and many other jurisdictions around the world are investing millions of dollars, is not effective and in fact, may actually increase the problem of cultural eutrophication.

The dramatic rise in cultural eutrophicationthe addition of nutrients to a body of water due to human activity that often causes huge algal blooms, fish kills and other problems in lakes throughout the worldhas resulted from increased deposits of nutrients to lakes, largely from human sewage and agricultural wastes.

For 37 years researchers looked at Lake 227, a small lake in the Canadian Shield at the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA) in Ontario, Canada, and examined the best ways to control the cultural eutrophication process of lakes by varying the levels of phosphorous and nitrogen added to the lake.

"What we found goes against the practices of the European Union and many scientists around the world," said David Schindler, professor of ecology at the University of Alberta and one of the leading water researchers in the world. "Controlling nitrogen does not correct the polluted lakes, and in fact, may actually aggravate the problem and make it worse."

A previous study, entitled, A Survey of the State of the World's Lakes, found that the cultural eutrophication of lakes has had a global effect. The continent percentage of lakes with cultural eutrophication were shown as:

Asia: 54 per cent
Europe: 53 per cent
North America: 48 per cent
South America: 41 per cent
Africa: 28 per cent

"The damage to these lakes is a major concern for virtually every continent," said Schindler.

The impact on human society is immense he says, as cultural eutrophication severely reduces water quality, which not only kills and contaminates fish, shellfish and other animals, but also can become a health-related problem in humans once it begins to interfere with drinking water treatment.


'/>"/>

Contact: Kris Connor
kris.connor@ualberta.ca
780-492-9214
University of Alberta
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. MIT researchers offer glimpse of rare mutant cells
2. UC San Diego researchers could help US military thwart explosive threats
3. As rates rise, researchers find better way to identify melanoma
4. Researchers discover a gene that regulates and blocks ovulation
5. Researchers discover link between organ transplantation and increased cancer risk
6. Dartmouth researchers discover gene signatures for scleroderma
7. Louisiana Tech researchers feature drug reformulation in prestigious journal
8. UCLA researchers locate and image prostate cancer as it spreads to lymph nodes
9. Researchers catch ion channels in their opening act
10. UGA researchers discover mechanism that explains how cancer enzyme winds up on ends of chromosomes
11. Researchers hack final part of the immune system code
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/5/2017)... , April 5, 2017  The Allen Institute ... Allen Cell Explorer: a one-of-a-kind portal and dynamic digital ... 3D imaging data, the first application of deep learning ... human stem cell lines and a growing suite of ... platform for these and future publicly available resources created ...
(Date:4/4/2017)... YORK , April 4, 2017   EyeLock ... today announced that the United States Patent and Trademark ... patent broadly covers the linking of an iris image ... same transaction) and represents the company,s 45 th ... latest patent is very timely given the multi-modal biometric ...
(Date:3/30/2017)... -- The research team of The Hong Kong Polytechnic ... by adopting ground breaking 3D fingerprint minutiae recovery and matching technology, ... accuracy for use in identification, crime investigation, immigration control, security of ... ... A research team led by Dr ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:9/19/2017)... ... , ... The new and improved Oakton® pocket testers, from Cole-Parmer, stand up ... a new cap design that is versatile, functional and leakproof. They are ideal for ... water quality. , The Oakton pocket testers have many user-friendly and functional features. An ...
(Date:9/19/2017)... Sept. 19, 2017 ValGenesis Inc., the global ... pleased to announce the strategic partnership with VTI Life ... with validation services using the latest technology available in ... provide clients with efficient and cost-effective validation services using ... for the ValGenesis VLMS system. ...
(Date:9/19/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... September 19, 2017 , ... ... technologies, today announced a partnership with Cytena GmbH to launch the CloneSelectâ„¢ Single-Cell ... real-time image analysis to isolate single cells and provide visual documentation of monoclonality ...
(Date:9/19/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Band-LOK, LLC, an orthopedic medical device innovation ... patents have been allowed by the USPTO on the proprietary Tether Clamp and ... explore additional clinically-relevant designs for both the implants and the instrumentation. I ...
Breaking Biology Technology: