Navigation Links
Researchers find chink in the armor of viral 'tummy bug'
Date:12/23/2008

Researchers at Griffith University's Institute for Glycomics in collaboration with colleagues at the University of Melbourne have moved a step closer to identifying a broad spectrum treatment for the dreaded 'viral tummy bug' or rotavirus.

These highly-infectious viruses are the leading cause of severe diarrhoea in young children, responsible for thousands of hospitalisations in the developed world, and hundreds of thousands of deaths each year in developing countries.

Institute Executive Director Professor Mark von Itzstein said research findings published in the world-leading Chemical Biology journal Nature Chemical Biology this week demanded a total rethink of how these viruses work.

"Rotaviruses are thought to infect the bodies by sticking to certain types of sugars called sialic acids on the surface of our stomach cells. They then enter cells and reproduce rapidly, causing illness," he said.

"Rotavirus vaccines are still in their infancy, as problems emerged with the first vaccine that was trialled a number of years ago. While other vaccines are now in clinical use, new directions are required in the development of potential drugs to prevent or treat this deadly virus."

He said that to better understand how carbohydrates are involved in rotavirus infection, researchers had focussed on treating mammalian cells with a protein called sialidase which cuts these surface sugars so the virus cannot attach.

Previous to his group's work most scientists believed only some of the many strains of rotavirus infection could be prevented with sialidase treatment while others were apparently immune to its effects.

This led to the conclusion that some viruses depend on sialic acid to infect the body while others were thought to cause infection independent of sialic acid.

"Unsuccessful attempts to reduce rotavirus infection with this treatment led scientists to group rotaviruses into two class
'/>"/>

Contact: Jeannette Langan
j.langan@griffith.edu.au
61-755-528-654
Research Australia
Source:Eurekalert

Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Biomedical researchers create artificial human bone marrow in a test tube
2. Princeton researchers discover new type of laser
3. UT Southwestern researchers identify gene linked to inherited form of fatal lung disease
4. James Thomson receives 2008 Massry Prize honoring stem cell researchers
5. Researchers push nature beyond its limits to create higher-density biofuels
6. Researchers advance knowledge of little nano-machines in our body
7. No quick or easy technological fix for climate change, researchers say
8. Researchers find natures shut-off switch for cellulose production
9. Researchers compile molecular manual for 100s of inherited diseases
10. Pitt researchers create non-toxic clean-up method for potentially toxic nano materials
11. Researchers identify new anti-tumor gene
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:7/9/2014)... crucial piece of the puzzle behind nature,s ability ... could help advance the development of artificial photosynthesis ... provided by an international collaboration of scientists led ... (Berkeley Lab) and the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. ... Source (LCLS), the world,s most powerful x-ray laser, ...
(Date:7/9/2014)... (TCGA) Research Network have identified novel mutations in ... most common subtype of lung cancer. Knowledge of ... possible therapeutic targets for this disease and potentially ... mutations because many potent cancer drugs that target ... funded and managed by the National Cancer Institute ...
(Date:7/9/2014)... Ill. With over 100 diseases that can attack ... top of the most wanted list? University of Illinois ... that more research is needed on the fungus that ... with cool, damp growing conditions but Macrophomina phaseolina ... and dry drought conditions. , "As the climate continues ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Postcards from the photosynthetic edge 2Postcards from the photosynthetic edge 3Study identifies novel genomic changes in the most common type of lung cancer 2Study identifies novel genomic changes in the most common type of lung cancer 3Climate change provides good growing conditions for charcoal rot in soybeans 2Climate change provides good growing conditions for charcoal rot in soybeans 3
... -- The Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry will present ... its 33rd Annual Meeting, November 11 at the Long Beach ... the Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science of the ... to the understanding of fate and effects of metals in ...
... Four young scientists have received postdoctoral fellowships from the ... program, they conduct research with the eventual aim of ... receiving mentorship from a faculty member at their home ... seven research teams. This allows them to interact with ...
... 2012  Verinata Health, Inc., a privately-held company dedicated to ... at the 62 nd Annual Meeting of the ... being held in San Francisco, California. (Logo: ... offers pregnant women access to a blood test that ...
Cached Biology News:SETAC announces Chris Lee Award for metals research winner, Kevin Brix 2Space research institute awards postdoctoral fellowships to 4 scientists 2Verinata Health Announces New Findings At The American Society Of Human Genetics 2
(Date:1/15/2014)... The Microcompetition with Foreign DNA theory explains ... these latent viruses is the Epstein Barr Virus (EBV), and ... (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease that destroys the body’s ... RA patients have high concentrations of EBV DNA in their ...
(Date:1/15/2014)... Scottsdale, Arizona (PRWEB) January 15, 2014 ... growth for Scottsdale’s Brain State Technologies®. They saw continued ... University Medical Center who were awarded a $1 million ... papers published in “Brain and Behavior” a peer reviewed ...
(Date:1/15/2014)... 2014 AudioNotch is the internet's leading ... the treatment of tinnitus. Patients listen to sound therapy ... a period of weeks to months, their tinnitus volume decreases. ... forms: Notched Music and Notched White Noise. Now, AudioNotch is ...
(Date:1/14/2014)... 2014 Date: Friday, April 11, 2014 , ... Club, 1360 Almshouse Road, Warrington, Pa. , Details: ... dedicated to finding a cure for hepatitis B and improving ... its annual Crystal Ball on Friday, April 11 at Warrington ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Study: Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Patients Have EBV; The CBCD Says this is Consistent with Microcompetition 2Study: Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Patients Have EBV; The CBCD Says this is Consistent with Microcompetition 3Dynamic Innovative Technology Showcased at Scottsdale Company’s Open House 2Dynamic Innovative Technology Showcased at Scottsdale Company’s Open House 3Hepatitis B Foundation to Host Annual Crystal Ball Gala 2
... CellCyte Genetics,Corporation (CellCyte) (OTC Bulletin Board: CCYG) ... investment and financial advice and,services. CellCyte seeks to ... technologies and will work with InCap to initiate ... of,CellCyte,s cell expander and stem cell delivery technologies., ...
... China, July 9 /Xinhua-PRNewswire/ -- WuXi PharmaTech (NYSE:,WX), ... development outsourcing company with operations in China and ... D. Bryans, Vice President,and General Manager of WuXi ... of WuXi PharmaTech (Cayman) Inc., has been invited,to ...
... organic light-emitting diodes, require a transparent conductive layer with ... electron holes into an organic layer to produce more ... the International Conference on Science and Technology of Synthetic ... the injection efficiency. A balanced injection of positive and ...
Cached Biology Technology:CellCyte Genetics Retains InCap Group to Advise on Business Strategy and Financing 2CellCyte Genetics Retains InCap Group to Advise on Business Strategy and Financing 3CellCyte Genetics Retains InCap Group to Advise on Business Strategy and Financing 4WuXi AppTec VP and GM Invited to Join the AAMI Standards Board 2WuXi AppTec VP and GM Invited to Join the AAMI Standards Board 3Research helps understand factors that influence efficiency of organic-based devices 2Research helps understand factors that influence efficiency of organic-based devices 3