Navigation Links
Researchers explain why some wound infections become chronic
Date:12/17/2013

RIVERSIDE, Calif. Chronic wounds affect an estimated 6.5 million Americans at an annual cost of about $25 billion. Further, foot blisters and other diabetic ulcers or sores account for the vast majority of foot and leg amputations in the United States today.

Why does treating chronic wounds cost so much? What complicates chronic wound infections, making healing difficult?

Manuela Martins-Green, a professor of cell biology at the University of California, Riverside, reports that two biological activities are out of control in chronic wound infections. These are reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are chemically reactive molecules formed by the partial reduction of oxygen, and biofilms that are formed by selective invading bacteria.

ROS is the natural byproduct of the normal oxygen metabolism and plays a role in cell signaling and homeostasis. However, excessive ROS can induce chronic inflammation, a key characteristic of wounds that do not heal. The biofilms are bacterial defense mechanisms. Together they create a toxic environment that can resist efforts to heal and close a chronic wound.

"By decreasing ROS levels within a chronic wound in a diabetic mouse model, my lab was able to normalize conditions and heal the wound," Martins-Green said. "Indeed, we saw significant improvement in healing the wound."

She announced her findings on Dec. 17 in New Orleans, La., at the 53rd annual meeting of the American Society for Cell Biology.

To identify the central role of ROS in maintaining chronic wound infection, Martins-Green's lab inhibited two antioxidant enzymes, glutathione peroxidase and catalase. Ordinarily, these enzymes help maintain normal tissue levels of ROS. But when they were inhibited, the amount of ROS in the wounds soared and the biofilm strengthened. The scientists also found that the two antioxidant enzymes were more damaging if they were inhibited in combination rather than individually.

Next, to decrease ROS to normal levels, the researchers applied two strong antioxidant supplements, vitamin E and N-Acetyl cysteine. As a result, the activities of the antioxidant enzymes glutathione peroxidase and catalase were restored, ROS levels decreased, and the bacterial biofilm disintegrated in the wound all of which resulted in the development of healthier wound tissue and led to wound healing.

"Our results show for the first time that by deliberately modulating specific parameters, we can create chronic wounds and then reverse chronicity by antioxidant treatment," Martins-Green said. "These findings should help in unraveling the mechanisms underlying the development of chronic wounds and hence in identifying potential targets for treatment of these wounds in humans."


'/>"/>

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. Stanford researchers take a step toward developing a universal flu vaccine
2. Researchers engineer a hybrid 5 times more effective in delivering genetic material into cells
3. New organization brings together top researchers to sequence genomes of invertebrates
4. Bonefish spawning behavior in the Bahamas surprises researchers, should aid conservation
5. Where water is limited, researchers determine how much water is enough
6. Researchers at Penn help develop a dynamic model of tissue failure
7. Leibniz Prizes 2014: DFG honors 11 outstanding researchers
8. Researchers named to National Academy of Inventors
9. Researchers at Penn show optimal framework for heartbeats
10. University researchers observe surprising bonefish spawning behavior in the Bahamas
11. ASU researchers discover chameleons use colorful language to communicate
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Researchers explain why some wound infections become chronic
(Date:4/15/2016)... , April 15, 2016 ... "Global Gait Biometrics Market 2016-2020,"  report to their ... ) , ,The global gait biometrics market ... 13.98% during the period 2016-2020. Gait ... which can be used to compute factors that ...
(Date:3/29/2016)... 29, 2016 LegacyXChange, Inc. (OTC: ... and SelectaDNA/CSI Protect are pleased to announce our successful ... a variety of writing instruments, ensuring athletes signatures against ... collectibles from athletes on LegacyXChange will be assured of ... DNA. Bill Bollander , CEO states, ...
(Date:3/18/2016)... , March 18, 2016 ... Suppliers of Biometrics, ICT, Manned & Unmanned Vehicles, Physical infrastructure ... & security companies in the border security market and the ... and Europe has led visiongain ... companies improved success. --> defence & security ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:5/3/2016)... ... May 03, 2016 , ... ... NYC , the sensor and data driven conferences, will take place on June 7-8, 2016, at ... UnitedHealth's Vidya Raman-Tangella on incorporating technology -- including AR/VR, machine learning, apps, robotics ...
(Date:5/3/2016)... ... 2016 , ... According to world renowned prostate cancer surgeon, Dr. David ... had two main treatment options: surgery or radiation. Based on a patient’s goals, disease ... has enabled doctors to administer higher doses of radiation to prostate cancer ...
(Date:5/2/2016)... ... May 02, 2016 , ... Meister Media ... the fresh look and added functionality give the agricultural world a taste of ... dynamic shift in agriculture – from precision farming via satellites and Unmanned Aerial ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... April 30, 2016 , ... The MIT bioLogic design ... the bioLogic team explored how bacterial properties can be applied to fabric and formed ... bacteria, which move in response to humidity change. The team harvested Natto cells and ...
Breaking Biology Technology: