Navigation Links
Researchers establish common seasonal pattern among bacterial communities in Arctic rivers
Date:11/24/2009

Cambridge, Md. (November 24, 2009) New research on bacterial communities throughout six large Arctic river ecosystems reveals predictable temporal patterns, suggesting that scientists could use these communities as markers for monitoring climate change in the polar regions. The study, published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Early Edition, shows that bacterial communities in the six rivers shifted synchronously over time, correlating with seasonal shifts in hydrology and biogeochemistry.

The research team documents these patterns through a three-year, circumpolar study of planktonic bacterial communities in the six largest rivers of the pan-arctic watershed: the Ob', Yenisey, Lena, Kolyma, Yukon, and Mackenzie Rivers.

"Our results demonstrate that synchrony, seasonality and annual reassembly in planktonic bacterial communities occur on global scales," said lead author Dr. Byron Crump of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science Horn Point Laboratory. "Since bacterial communities in big arctic rivers shift predictably with circumpolar seasonal changes in environmental conditions, they may serve as sensitive indicators of climate change in the Arctic."

"The six river systems studied are comparable in size to the Mississippi River in the United States," said coauthor Rainer Amon of Texas A&M University at Galveston. "One of the things we learned is the bacteria communities in all six of them seem to be very similar. There are many questions still to be answered, such as how these bacteria communities might respond to a continued increase in temperature."

This synchrony indicates that hemisphere-scale variation in seasonal climate sets the pace of variation in microbial diversity. Moreover, these seasonal communities reassembled each year in all six rivers, suggesting a long-term, predictable succession in the composition of big river bacterial communities.

Divergence from this synchronous pattern may provide an early signal of climate change in some regions of the Arctic, and may result in changes to river microbial communities and the biogeochemical transformations that they carry out.

Data for this study was collected through the PARTNERS program, a collaboration among scientists from the U.S., Canada and Russia examining the largest rivers of the pan-arctic watershed. By including five of the world's 25 largest rivers in the study, the results provide a unique perspective on global-scale patterns in bacterial diversity.


'/>"/>

Contact: Christopher Conner
cconner@umces.edu
443-496-0095
University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Researchers identify proteins involved in new neurodegenerative syndrome
2. Texas researchers and educators head for Antarctica
3. MGH researchers describe new way to identify, evolve novel enzymes
4. University of Pennsylvania researchers develop formula to gauge risk of disease clusters
5. U of MN researchers discover noninvasive diagnostic tool for brain diseases
6. U of Minnesota researchers discover noninvasive diagnostic tool for brain diseases
7. Researchers discover new strategies for antibiotic resistance
8. Researchers find new taste in fruit flies: carbonated water
9. Binghamton University researchers investigate evolving malaria resistance
10. UIC researchers find promising new targets for antibiotics
11. Researchers develop simple method to create natural drug products
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/2/2017)...  Central to its deep commitment to honor ... Japan Prize Foundation today announced the laureates of ... envelope in their respective fields of Life Sciences ... being recognized with the 2017 Japan Prize for ... to the advancement of science and technology, but ...
(Date:1/26/2017)...  Crossmatch, a leading provider of security and identity ... combatting fraud, waste and abuse in assistance operations around ... on Disaster Relief conference in Panama City ... and foreign assistance organizations throughout Latin America ... a largely unacknowledged problem in the foreign assistance and ...
(Date:1/24/2017)... Jan. 24, 2017  It sounds simple and ... that monitors vital signs and alerts parents on ... oxygen saturation level drops. But pediatric experts argue ... parents, with no evidence of medical benefits, especially ... marketed aggressively to parents of healthy babies, promising ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:2/23/2017)... Feb. 23, 2017  MIODx announced today that ... key immunotherapy technologies from the University of California, ... method to monitor a patient for response to ... CTLA-4.  The second license extends the technology with ... likely to have an immune-related adverse event (IRAE) ...
(Date:2/23/2017)... ... February 23, 2017 , ... ... evaluation of multiple immunoassay-based threat detection technologies by researchers from the Pacific ... biosensor threat detection technology was found to have the best level of ...
(Date:2/23/2017)... Aviva Systems Biology Corporation (ASB) which ... GenWay Biotech Incorporated, a protein solutions and applications ... for both the research and diagnostic markets. ... capabilities for both entities. GenWay,s 18 years of experience ... complement ASB,s objective to become a leading provider ...
(Date:2/22/2017)... Santa Clara, CA (PRWEB) , ... February 22, 2017 , ... ... is hosting a free AFM Luncheon for all SPIE attendees ... San Jose, CA, just one block from the San Jose Convention Center. The ...
Breaking Biology Technology: