Navigation Links
Researchers discover mechanism that limits scar formation
Date:6/10/2010

Researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago have discovered that an unexpected cellular response plays an important role in breaking down and inhibiting the formation of excess scar tissue in wound healing.

Their study was published online this week in Nature Cell Biology.

When an organism suffers severe injury, specialized cells are "recruited" to the wound site that rapidly produce extracellular matrix proteins such as collagen to provide structural support to the tissue, according to Lester Lau, professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at the UIC College of Medicine and principal investigator in the study.

Joon-Il Jun, a postdoctoral fellow working in Lau's lab and first author of the paper, found that fibroblasts recruited to the site of skin wounds were entering a state of reproductive dormancy, or cell-cycle arrest, called senescence.

This was quite unexpected, Jun said. Until now senescence was believed to occur in cells that suffered DNA damage -- to prevent them from proliferating and, possibly, becoming cancerous.

He discovered that the senescent fibroblasts were making proteins that degraded the extracellular matrix and accelerated the breakdown of collagen. The senescent cells also stopped making collagen.

"The accumulation of senescent cells in the wound has the biological effect of inhibiting the formation of excess scar tissue," Jun said.

Jun also discovered that a protein called CCN1 is responsible for turning on the senescent state in fibroblasts. He was able to show that in mice with a mutated, non-functional form of CCN1, the fibroblasts at the site of a skin wound did not become senescent, and the wound developed excessive scar tissue.

Further, Jun was able to "rescue" the mutated mice by applying CCN1 protein topically to the skin wound, triggering fibroblast senescence and limiting the formation of scar tissue.

The discovery that senescence is a normal wound-healing response in the skin; that senescence in the wound serves an anti-fibrotic function; and that CCN1 is the critical protein that controls this process may prove important in understanding a wide range of pathological conditions related to tissue scarring, said Lau.

"For example, chronic injury to the liver from a number of causes, including viral infections, alcoholism, diabetes and obesity, leads to fibrosis and may progress to cirrhosis," Lau said. "After a heart attack, accumulation of scar tissue in the heart impairs its ability to pump efficiently."

The ability to control the formation of scar tissue, or fibrosis, has important implications for future therapies for treating wound-healing disorders, including organ damage where functional tissue is replaced with scar tissue, Lau said.


'/>"/>

Contact: Jeanne Galatzer-Levy
jgala@uic.edu
312-996-1583
University of Illinois at Chicago
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Researchers identify gene linked to hereditary incontinence
2. UCLA stem cell researchers uncover previously unknown patterns in DNA methylation
3. Lasers help researchers predict birds preferred habitat
4. Researchers find gene linked to birth defects
5. Yale researchers develop test to identify best sperm
6. UT Southwestern researchers use novel sperm stem-cell technique to produce genetically modified rats
7. UCI researchers create retina from human embryonic stem cells
8. Discovery may lead to safer drinking water, cheaper medicine: Queens University researchers
9. Researchers discover new mechanism for clearing blockages from smallest blood vessels
10. Researchers calculate the greenhouse gas value of ecosystems
11. Queens researchers reveal parasitic threat to animals and the environment
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:1/25/2016)... Jan. 25, 2016   Unisys Corporation (NYSE: UIS ... F. Kennedy (JFK) International Airport, New York City ... identify imposters attempting to enter the United States ... them. pilot testing of the system at Dulles ... terminals at JFK during January 2016. --> pilot testing ...
(Date:1/22/2016)... DUBLIN , Jan. 22, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... announced the addition of the "Global ... report to their offering. --> ... of the "Global Biometrics Market in ... offering. --> Research and ...
(Date:1/20/2016)... MINNETONKA, Minn. , Jan. 20, 2016   ... that supports the entire spectrum of clinical research, is ... in 2015. MedNet,s significant achievements are the result of ... of) iMedNet eClinical , it,s comprehensive, ... --> --> Key MedNet growth ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:2/4/2016)... -- Sangamo BioSciences, Inc. (NASDAQ: SGMO ), the leader ... Lanphier , Sangamo,s president and chief executive officer, will ... Therapeutic ® development programs and an overview of ... Thursday, February 11, 2016, at the Leerink Partners 5 ... being held in New York . ...
(Date:2/4/2016)... and MENLO PARK, Calif. , Feb. ... ("DelMar" and the "Company"), a biopharmaceutical company focused on the ... it will present at the 18 th Annual ... 2016 at 10:00 a.m. EST in New York, ... president and CEO, will provide an update on the ongoing ...
(Date:2/4/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... February 04, 2016 , ... ... (AI) and leading supplier of Semantic Graph Database technology has been recognized As ... Products ” by Corporate America Magazine. , “At Corporate America, it’s our priority ...
(Date:2/3/2016)... 2016  With the growing need for better ... underway, therapies such as monoclonal antibodies, recombinant protein ... of indications are in high demand. Conventionally expression ... and production of these therapeutics. However, due to ... costs, novel approaches and novel expression systems are ...
Breaking Biology Technology: