Navigation Links
Researchers discover gene that causes obesity in mice
Date:3/5/2013

AURORA, Colo. (March 5, 2013) Researchers have discovered that deleting a specific gene in mice prevents them from becoming obese even on a high fat diet, a finding they believe may be replicated in humans.

"When fed a diet that induces obesity these mice don't get fat," said Prof. James McManaman, Ph.D., lead author of the study and vice-chairman of research for Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. "It may be possible to duplicate this in humans using existing technology that targets this specific gene."

The two-year study, funded by the National Institutes of Health and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, was published last month in the Journal of Lipid Research.

The research team created a strain of mice without the Plin2 gene which produces a protein that regulates fat storage and metabolism. They immediately found that the mice were resistant to obesity.

Usually, mice fed a high fat diet will eat voraciously, yet these showed an unusual restraint. Not only did they eat less, they were more active.

Their fat cells were also 20 percent smaller than typical mice and did not show the kind of inflammation usually associated with obesity, the study said. Obesity-associated fatty liver disease, common in obese humans and rodents, was absent in the mice without the Plin2 gene.

"The mice were healthier," McManaman said. "They had lower triglyceride levels, they were more insulin-sensitive, they had no incidents of fatty liver disease and there was less inflammation in the fat cells."

The absence of the gene may cause fat to be metabolized faster, he said.

"Now we want to know why this works physiologically," McManaman said. "We want to better understand how this affects food consumption."

According to the study, understanding how Plin2 is involved in the control of energy balance will provide new insights into "the mechanisms by which nutrition overload is detected, and how individuals adapt to, or fail to adapt to, dietary challenges."

The consequences for people are highly significant since they also possess the Plin2 gene.

"It could mean that we have finally discovered a way to disrupt obesity in humans," he said. "That would be a major breakthrough."


'/>"/>

Contact: David Kelly
303-315-6374
University of Colorado Denver
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. U of M researchers utilize genetically corrected stem cells to spark muscle regeneration
2. Researchers id queens, mysterious disease syndrome as key factors in bee colony deaths
3. Study led by NUS researchers proves the existence of 3 overstretched DNA structures
4. U of M researchers identify genetic variation behind acute myeloid leukemia treatment success
5. 3 Johns Hopkins researchers recognized for medical inventions
6. University of Alberta researchers bake a better loaf of bread
7. Researchers at IRB Barcelona discover a general mechanism that accelerates tumor development
8. Brown University researchers build robotic bat wing
9. Researchers say sunlight yields more efficient carbon dioxide to methanol model
10. Researchers decipher modus operandi of potential Alzheimers drug
11. Stanford researchers develop tool for reading the minds of mice
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/2/2016)... , Feb. 2, 2016  Based on ... Frost & Sullivan recognizes US-based Intelligent Retinal Imaging ... & Sullivan Award for New Product Innovation. IRIS, ... North America , is poised ... rapidly growing diabetic retinopathy market. The IRIS technology ...
(Date:1/28/2016)... Jan. 28, 2016 Synaptics (NASDAQ: SYNA ), a ... its second quarter ended December 31, 2015. ... of fiscal 2016 increased 2 percent compared to the comparable quarter ... of fiscal 2016 was $35.0 million, or $0.93 per diluted share. ... income for the first quarter of fiscal 2016 grew 9 percent ...
(Date:1/22/2016)... 2016 http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/4lmf2s/global_behavioral ... the  "Global Behavioral Biometric Market 2016-2020" ... http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/4lmf2s/global_behavioral ) has announced the ... Market 2016-2020"  report to their offering. ... http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/4lmf2s/global_behavioral ) has announced the addition ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:2/10/2016)... ... , ... LATHAM, NEW YORK... Marktech Optoelectronics will feature their new ... San Francisco’s Moscone Center from February 16-18, 2016, and at the healthcare-focused BiOS Expo ... PIN diode standard packages feature a TO-46 metal can with active areas of 1.0mm ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... ... February 10, 2016 , ... PatientCrossroads announces that ... secure online PatientCrossroads platform, has exceeded both its one-year and overall recruitment goals ... study, which seeks to advance understanding of the hereditary risks for certain kinds ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... ... February 10, 2016 , ... ... announced a new agreement with Singapore-based Global Stem Cells Network (GSCN) and its ... Thailand and Singapore in the latest adipose and bone marrow therapies. , ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... February 09, 2016 , ... ... services and current winner of the Highest Overall Customer Rating Award from ... all of its business units across the USA, Canada, Mexico and China. , ...
Breaking Biology Technology: