Navigation Links
Researchers capture bacterial infection on film

Researchers have developed a new technique that allows them to make a movie of bacteria infecting their living host.

Whilst most studies of bacterial infection are done after the death of the infected organism, this system developed by scientists at the University of Bath and University of Exeter is the first to follow the progress of infection in real-time with living organisms.

The researchers used developing fruit fly embryos as a model organism, injecting fluorescently tagged bacteria into the embryos and observing their interaction with the insect's immune system using time-lapse confocal microscopy.

The researchers can also tag individual bacterial proteins to follow their movement and determine their specific roles in the infection process.

The scientists are hoping to use this system in the future with human pathogens such as Listeria and Trypanosomes. By observing how these bacteria interact with the immune system, researchers will gain a better understanding of how they cause an infection and could eventually lead to better antibacterial treatments.

Dr Will Wood, Research Fellow in the Department of Biology & Biochemistry at the University of Bath, explained: "Cells often behave very differently once they have been taken out of their natural environment and cultured in a petri dish.

"In the body, immune surveillance cells such as hemocytes (or macrophages in vertebrates) are exposed to a battery of signals from different sources. The cells integrate these signals and react to them accordingly.

"Once these cells are removed from this complex environment and cultured in a petri dish these signals are lost. Therefore it is really important to study whole organisms to fully understand how bacteria interact with their host."

Dr Nick Waterfield, co-author on the study and Research Officer at the University of Bath, said: "To be able to film the microscopic battle between single bacterial cells and immune cells in a whole animal and in real time is astounding.

"It will ultimately allow us to properly understand the dynamic nature of the infection process."

Professor Richard Ffrench-Constant, Professor of Molecular Natural History at the University of Exeter, added: "For the first time this allows us to actually examine infection in real time in a real animal it's a major advance!"


Contact: Vicky Just
University of Bath

Related biology news :

1. Researchers identify proteins involved in new neurodegenerative syndrome
2. Texas researchers and educators head for Antarctica
3. MGH researchers describe new way to identify, evolve novel enzymes
4. University of Pennsylvania researchers develop formula to gauge risk of disease clusters
5. U of MN researchers discover noninvasive diagnostic tool for brain diseases
6. U of Minnesota researchers discover noninvasive diagnostic tool for brain diseases
7. Researchers discover new strategies for antibiotic resistance
8. Researchers find new taste in fruit flies: carbonated water
9. Binghamton University researchers investigate evolving malaria resistance
10. UIC researchers find promising new targets for antibiotics
11. Researchers develop simple method to create natural drug products
Post Your Comments:
Related Image:
Researchers capture bacterial infection on film
(Date:9/24/2015)... NEW YORK , Sept. 24, 2015  EyeLock ... will be showcasing its award winning and latest technology ... Anaheim, California . EyeLock,s ... and security with unmatched biometric accuracy, making it the ... DNA.   EyeLock,s platform uses video technology to deliver a ...
(Date:9/10/2015)... This report provides detailed descriptions of the ... emerging sensor types that will dominate in the future. ... the wearable technology hype curve in the last five ... feature with all of them is the prominence of ... useful functions. Sensors collect data about the physical and ...
(Date:9/10/2015)... Report Details The global wearable ... previous expectations of revenues, consumer adoption and even technological ... which wearables begin to achieve that mass market acceptance ... reasons is the entrance of Apple to the SmartWatches ... but the overall size of the wearable technology market. ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/13/2015)... SPRINGS, Florida , October 13, 2015 ... AVXLD), Juno Therapeutics, Inc. (NASDAQ: JUNO ), and ... ARRY ), Avanex Life Sciences Corp. (OTCQX: AVXLD), ... Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (NASDAQ: PGNX ) --> ... and the biotech industry can potentially lead to advancements ...
(Date:10/13/2015)... -- TapImmune, Inc. (TPIV), a clinical-stage ... and gene-based immunotherapeutics and vaccines for the treatment of ... company at the Dawson James Small Cap Growth ... Jupiter, Florida on October 15, 2015. ... immunotherapy company specializing in the development of innovative peptide ...
(Date:10/13/2015)... ... October 13, 2015 , ... Clinovo recently appointed Jeff Parr and ... fast growing clinical data solutions business. , Jeff Parr has spent the past decade ... including Avery Dennison, Thermo Fisher, and Ab Sciex to name a few. He ...
(Date:10/13/2015)... 13, 2015 the United States ... .  PRCC represents about 14% of all new cases of kidney ... Canada and Europe . ...   --> Hutchison China MediTech Limited ("Chi-Med") (AIM: HCM) ... and AstraZeneca AB (publ) ("AstraZeneca") have completed enrolment in a global ...
Breaking Biology Technology: