Navigation Links
Researchers at UH explore patient preferences for personalized medicine
Date:10/30/2008

HOUSTON, Oct. 30, 2008 While a growing number of doctors are introducing personalized medicine into their practices, it remains largely unclear how receptive patients are to employing genomic diagnostics to tailor-make drugs. Armed with a $398,000, two-year grant, a University of Houston research team has initiated a research project to determine patient preferences and, thus, educate health policymakers and physicians.

The team will be led by Amalia M. Issa, who heads the Program in Personalized Medicine and Targeted Therapeutics at the Abramson Family Center for the Future of Health, a joint initiative between UH and The Methodist Hospital Research Institute. Personalized medicine uses a genotype or gene expression profile to stratify patients into smaller sub-populations to achieve greater prescribing precision, Issa explained. It can be used to identify disease stages, the most appropriate medications or dosages, or even preventative measures.

Issa's project will analyze the willingness of patients from various socio-economic backgrounds to adopt, and pay for the use of, genomic diagnostics to tailor prescriptions.

"Personalized medicine lies at the crossroads of science and technology, and there are a number of barriers to its translation and implementation into clinical practice," said Issa, associate professor at the UH College of Technology and College of Pharmacy. "As the science and technology advance, we need to be able to understand how personalized medicine applications will be accepted and adopted by patients. After all, it is patients who will help shape how the different technologies are used and which populations use them."

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, genetic tests for more than 1,200 diseases have been developed. Genetic testing initially was used largely to diagnose rare genetic disorders and determine ancestry, but an increasing number have broader applications, such as carrier identification, inherited risk prediction and drug-response assessment.

The UH research team aims to identify what types of trade-offs patients are willing to make when opting for pharmacogenomic testing, which uses genomic information to determine whether a drug is likely to cause beneficial or negative reactions. For instance, Issa said, patients considering pharmacogenomic testing must weigh out such things as the cost of the procedure and whether or not they want their genetic information on file with their insurance companies.

"As a field, personalized medicine includes diagnostic and therapeutic interventions, with risk defined through genetics as well as environmental factors," said Issa. "We believe it is important to quantify the attributes and trade-offs that patients encounter in order to predict demand and utilization of these emerging applications so that better health policies can be developed to maximize benefits and minimize risks."

The team expects its findings will lead to a better understanding of what technologies are currently in use, how they are incorporated into medical practice, which populations have access to them, and how the patient decision-making process works.

Yuen-Sum "Vincent" Lau, chair of the College of Pharmacy's pharmacological and pharmaceutical sciences department, emphasized that "Dr. Issa and her team are conducting a cutting-edge translational research, which will make the findings from basic and clinical research applicable to real medical practices and lead to better health-care delivery in the future."

The award announced last week by the Institute for Health Technology Studies (InHealth) was part of a $1.7 million package in grants for scientists examining the economic and social impacts of diagnostic and therapeutic medical devices on treating diseases and chronic medical conditions. InHealth gathers evidence about the contributions of technology to patients and society and makes the results available to policymakers and health leaders.

"Health issues reduce the quality of life for millions of Americans while incurring a heavy economic burden on patients and the health-care system," said Martyn Howgill, executive director of InHealth. "Medical technology plays a pivotal role in the diagnosis and treatment of injury and disease and while the intuitive evidence clearly suggests that medical technology benefits the patient, there's little objective evidence of its value to policymakers and regulators."


'/>"/>

Contact: Angela Hopp
713-743-8153
University of Houston
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. UC Davis researchers discover a key to aggressive breast cancer
2. Caltech-led researchers find negative cues from appearance alone matter for real elections
3. ASU researchers receive NIH awards for studies of malaria and emergent disease
4. Stanford researchers: Global warming is killing frogs and salamanders in Yellowstone Park
5. Syracuse University researchers discover new way to attack some forms of leukemia
6. Researchers apply systems biology and glycomics to study human inflammatory diseases
7. Researchers at UH explore use of fat cells as heart attack therapy
8. GUMC researchers hone in on new strategy to treat common infection
9. Ben-Gurion University of the Negev researchers help find that hypnosis can induce synesthesia
10. National Jewish Health researchers evaluating treatment to help emphysema sufferers breathe easier
11. Researchers at National Jewish Health evaluating a treatment
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/5/2017)...  The Allen Institute for Cell Science today announces ... portal and dynamic digital window into the human cell. ... application of deep learning to create predictive models of ... a growing suite of powerful tools. The Allen Cell ... publicly available resources created and shared by the Allen ...
(Date:4/3/2017)... , April 3, 2017  Data ... precision engineering platform, detected a statistically significant ... product prior to treatment and objective response ... the potential to predict whether cancer patients ... to treatment, as well as to improve ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... , March 29, 2017  higi, the health IT ... North America , today announced a ... the acquisition of EveryMove. The new investment and acquisition ... of tools to transform population health activities through the ... data. higi collects and secures data today ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/19/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Tunnell Consulting has been solving the most complex ... challenges faced by life sciences, biotech and pharmaceuticals companies today is in interpreting the ... , who is well known in the industry and brings significant high-level expertise to ...
(Date:6/16/2017)... , ... June 16, 2017 , ... CTNext , ... Innovation Awards (EIA), held at The LOFT at Chelsea Piers in Stamford. , Nine ... to a panel of judges for an opportunity to secure $10,000 awards to help ...
(Date:6/15/2017)... ... 15, 2017 , ... angelMD announced the closure of a ... angelMD’s SVP of Corporate Development, served as the syndicate leader for this first ... Saranas’ recently announced $4 million Series B financing round. , Saranas is working ...
(Date:6/14/2017)... ... June 14, 2017 , ... The Thailand Board ... announces that they’re co-hosting a delegation from Thailand at BIO 2017 in San ... industry gathering in the world, regroups more than 1,100 biotech companies, academic institutions, ...
Breaking Biology Technology: