Navigation Links
Research reveals link between beer and bone health
Date:2/7/2010

A new study suggests that beer is a significant source of dietary silicon, a key ingredient for increasing bone mineral density. Researchers from the Department of Food Science & Technology at the University of California, Davis studied commercial beer production to determine the relationship between beer production methods and the resulting silicon content, concluding that beer is a rich source of dietary silicon. Details of this study are available in the February issue of the Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, published by Wiley-Blackwell on behalf of the Society of Chemical Industry.

"The factors in brewing that influence silicon levels in beer have not been extensively studied" said Charles Bamforth, lead author of the study. "We have examined a wide range of beer styles for their silicon content and have also studied the impact of raw materials and the brewing process on the quantities of silicon that enter wort and beer."

Silicon is present in beer in the soluble form of orthosilicic acid (OSA), which yields 50% bioavailability, making beer a major contributor to silicon intake in the Western diet. According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), dietary silicon (Si), as soluble OSA, may be important for the growth and development of bone and connective tissue, and beer appears to be a major contributor to Si intake. Based on these findings, some studies suggest moderate beer consumption may help fight osteoporosis, a disease of the skeletal system characterized by low bone mass and deterioration of bone tissue.

The researchers examined a variety of raw material samples and found little change in the silicon content of barley during the malting process. The majority of the silicon in barley is in the husk, which is not affected greatly during malting. The malts with the higher silicon contents are pale colored which have less heat stress during the malting process. The darker products, such as the chocolate, roasted barley and black malt, all have substantial roasting and much lower silicon contents than the other malts for reasons that are not yet known. The hop samples analyzed showed surprisingly high levels of silicon with as much as four times more silicon than is found in malt. However, hops are invariably used in a much smaller quantity than is grain. Highly hopped beers, however, would be expected to contain higher silicon levels.

No silicon was picked up from silica hydrogel used to stabilize beer, even after a period of 24 hours and neither is there pick up from diatomaceous earth filter aid.

The study also tested 100 commercial beers for silicon content and categorized the data according to beer style and source. The average silicon content of the beers sampled was 6.4 to 56.5 mg/L.

"Beers containing high levels of malted barley and hops are richest in silicon," concludes Dr. Bamforth. "Wheat contains less silicon than barley because it is the husk of the barley that is rich in this element. While most of the silicon remains in the husk during brewing, significant quantities of silicon nonetheless are extracted into wort and much of this survives into beer."


'/>"/>

Contact: Dawn Peters
physicalsciencenews@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley-Blackwell
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. NTU researchers complete the worlds first in-depth study of the malaria parasite genome
2. TGen finalizes alliance with Van Andel Research Institute
3. Yale researchers may have uncovered the mechanism by which progesterone prevents preterm birth
4. MSU researcher awarded $2 million to tackle parasitic tropical diseases
5. Research finds water movements can shape fish evolution
6. New research shows genes of pregnant women and their fetuses can increase the risk of preterm labor
7. Scripps Research scientists find two compounds that lay the foundation for a new class of AIDS drug
8. JDRF-funded research advances potential for regeneration as a possible cure for type 1 diabetes
9. Finland invests €1.85 million in pan-European infrastructure for biomedical research
10. NIFA awards funding for animal health and production research
11. Secrets to superb malting barleys explored by ARS researchers
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/30/2017)... -- On April 6-7, 2017, Sequencing.com will host the world,s ... at Microsoft,s headquarters in Redmond, Washington ... health and wellness apps that provide a unique, personalized ... is the first hackathon for personal genomics and the ... the genomics, tech and health industries are sending teams ...
(Date:3/28/2017)... -- The report "Video Surveillance Market by ... Devices), Software (Video Analytics, VMS), and Service (VSaaS, Installation ... 2022", published by MarketsandMarkets, the market was valued at ... reach USD 75.64 Billion by 2022, at a CAGR ... considered for the study is 2016 and the forecast ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... -- The report "Gesture Recognition and Touchless Sensing Market by Technology ... Forecast to 2022", published by MarketsandMarkets, the market is expected to be worth ... and 2022. Continue Reading ... ... ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:4/25/2017)... ... April 25, 2017 , ... ... of Common Lisp (CL) development tools, and market leader for Semantic Graph ... performance enhancements now available within the most effective system for developing and deploying ...
(Date:4/25/2017)... ... April 25, 2017 , ... Leaders of Quorum Review ... be featured in multiple sessions at this week’s Association of Clinical Research Professionals ... best practices in clinical research. , "We are excited to present subject matter expertise ...
(Date:4/21/2017)... ... April 21, 2017 , ... The University ... first round funding to three startups through the UConn Innovation Fund. The $1.5 ... business startups affiliated with UConn. , The UConn Innovation Fund provides investments of ...
(Date:4/20/2017)... ... April 20, 2017 , ... As ... webinar will explore challenging patient cases when screening for direct oral anticoagulant. When ... be a need for bridging parental anticoagulation especially for those at high risk ...
Breaking Biology Technology: