Navigation Links
Research identifies type of vaccine that holds promise in protecting against TB

ST. LOUIS -- Researchers are one step closer to finding a vaccine that better protects against tuberculosis. An investigational vaccine for TB tested at Saint Louis University appears likely to offer significantly better protection against the potentially fatal disease than the one in current use.

"Not only was it as safe as the standard vaccine, it induced a better immune response, which suggests it will be more effective at protecting against tuberculosis," said Daniel Hoft, M.D., Ph.D., director of the division of immunobiology at Saint Louis University School of Medicine and lead author of the study.

The investigational vaccine is made from a weakened TB germ from one of the strains of the current tuberculosis vaccine, which was created more than 75 years ago. The new "recombinant" vaccine uses an antigen a secreted protein from a virulent strain of tuberculosis to help focus the immune system on blocking aggressive and deadly TB organisms.

In this phase I clinical trial, researchers vaccinated a total of 35 study participants. The standard TB vaccine -- called Bacille Calmette-Gurin (BCG) -- was given to 17 study participants, and 18 study participants received the investigational recombinant BCG vaccine.

Researchers compared five immune functions induced by the vaccines and found that the investigational vaccine induced more powerful responses that are important for protection against tuberculosis. The investigational vaccine also was safe and well tolerated.

The research demonstrated that the concept of using a recombinant vaccine holds promise in being able to better protect people from tuberculosis. This vaccine will not be tested further because it uses an antibiotic resistant gene that scientists want to keep out of the environment. However research in this area will continue as scientists test a similar recombinant BCG vaccine that expresses the same and additional key TB antigens that is expected to be even more potent than the one just studied and does not include the antibiotic resistant gene, Hoft said.

"A new vaccine theoretically could not only protect against the overwhelming growth of TB organisms, but could kill residual organisms after a person has become infected. That's the hope," Hoft said.

It's critical to find a better vaccine, Hoft said. Tuberculosis strikes developing nations hardest, infecting one in three people worldwide. Nearly 8 million new cases of TB develop each year, and 2 million die from the infectious disease.

"These staggering statistics persist despite the availability of a tuberculosis vaccine," Hoft said. "New vaccines are urgently needed to reduce this immense burden of TB."

The World Health Organization recommends the current BCG vaccine for infants in developing countries shortly after they are born. The vaccine induces partial protection, and vaccinated children who contract a tuberculosis infection have a less severe illness. The current vaccine is about 70 percent protective against deaths or meningitis from tuberculosis and about 50 percent protective against pulmonary tuberculosis.


Contact: Nancy Solomon
Saint Louis University

Related biology news :

1. Researchers identify Achilles heel of common childhood tumor
2. Waste from gut bacteria helps host control weight, UT Southwestern researchers report
3. Salk researchers successfully reprogram keratinocytes attached to a single hair
4. Scripps research team sheds light on immune system suppression
5. FSU researchers discovery leads to $1.5 million grant, potential new treatment of liver fibrosis
6. MU brain imaging center provides research for autism, schizophrenia and Parkinsons disease
7. Cost-effective farm waste-to-energy technology focus of research
8. Alzheimers disease research attracts first partner
9. NARSAD announces 2008 Prizes for Outstanding Achievement in Research on Mental Health Disorders
10. Researchers identify promising gene target for neuroblastoma therapy
11. Salk researcher Terry Sejnowski elected to Institute of Medicine
Post Your Comments:
(Date:4/15/2016)... DUBLIN , April 15, 2016 ... of the,  "Global Gait Biometrics Market 2016-2020,"  report ... ) , ,The global gait ... CAGR of 13.98% during the period 2016-2020. ... movement angles, which can be used to compute ...
(Date:4/13/2016)... 2016  IMPOWER physicians supporting Medicaid patients in ... clinical standard in telehealth thanks to a new partnership ... platform, IMPOWER patients can routinely track key health measurements, ... index, and, when they opt in, share them with ... a local retail location at no cost. By leveraging ...
(Date:3/31/2016)... , March 31, 2016  Genomics firm Nabsys has ... CEO, Barrett Bready , M.D., who returned to ... the original technical leadership team, including Chief Technology Officer, ... Product Development, Steve Nurnberg and Vice President of Software ... the company. Dr. Bready served as CEO ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... June 23, 2016 On Wednesday, June ... 4,833.32, down 0.22%; the Dow Jones Industrial Average edged 0.27% ... at 2,085.45, down 0.17%. has initiated coverage on the ... Nektar Therapeutics (NASDAQ: NKTR ), Aralez Pharmaceuticals Inc. ... BIND ). Learn more about these stocks by ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... ... June 23, 2016 , ... Regulatory Compliance ... consulting, provides a free webinar on Performing Quality Investigations: Getting to ... 12pm CT at no charge. , Incomplete investigations are still a major concern ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... FRANCISCO , June 22, 2016  Amgen (NASDAQ: ... sponsorship of the QB3@953 life sciences incubator ... human health. The shared laboratory space at QB3@953 was ... overcome a key obstacle for many early stage organizations ... part of the sponsorship, Amgen launched two "Amgen Golden ...
(Date:6/22/2016)... DIEGO , June 22, 2016 ... that will allow them to produce up to ... from one lot within one week. These high-quality, ... time laboriously preparing cells and spend more time ... possible through a proprietary, high-volume manufacturing process that ...
Breaking Biology Technology: