Navigation Links
Research breakthrough hailed on the anniversary of gene discovery
Date:10/4/2010

(Cincinnati, OH) In a study published today in the Journal, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, an international team of researchers based in the U.S. and UK revealed that they were able to halt the potentially lethal, breath holding episodes associated with the neurological disease Rett syndrome.

Rett syndrome is a disorder of the brain that affects around 1 in 10,000 young girls. On October 4, 1999, a groundbreaking study was published showing that the disease is caused by a spontaneous mutation in the gene methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2). The gene encodes a protein which acts as a "master switch" that is critical for controlling the expression of many other genes regulating the production of specific proteins in brain cells.

One of the more serious consequences of the disease is the intermittent episodes of breath holding, which can put individuals at risk for brain damage due to oxygen deprivation. The team led by Professor John Bissonnette, M.D., of Oregon Health and Science University, Portland OR and Professor Julian FR Paton, PhD, at the University of Bristol in the UK discovered a way to prevent the frequent episodes of breath holding in a mouse model of Rett syndrome using a unique combination of drugs.

Initially, the investigators' earlier work found that an area of the brain that allows breathing to persist throughout life, without interruption, has reduced levels of a vital transmitter substance called gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). The researchers took a two-pronged approach, using one set of drugs to increase the amount of GABA, and others to target a specific type of serotonin receptor to reduce activity in brain cells that normally depress inhalation. Both of these approaches halted the life threatening episodes of breathing arrests in Rett syndrome mice and confirmed the investigators' initial theory.

Dr. Bissonnette, co-principal investigator on the IRSF funded study commented, "When the phrenic nerve going to the diaphragm is silent, nerves going to muscles for expiration are excessively active. Building on our earlier studies that showed a defect in inhibition within the brain's respiratory areas, we reasoned that expiratory neurons were not receiving enough inhibition. When we boosted inhibition, or separately used a drug known to silence expiratory neurons, the pattern of breath holding was markedly improved." Dr. Bissonnette added, "While the specific drugs used in this mouse study are not available for human use, drugs with similar modes of action have been used in other conditions."

On Friday, the International Rett Syndrome Foundation (IRSF) announced $1.5M in funding for new research grants in 2010. IRSF announced continuing support for Drs. Bissonnette and Paton who will conduct follow-up studies to further investigate the pharmacological treatment of respiratory dysfunction in mouse models of Rett syndrome.

Commenting on the study, IRSF Chief Scientific Officer Dr. Antony Horton said, "The work of Drs. Bissonnette and Paton presents a powerful proof of concept which allows us to think of new ways to potentially treat this life-threatening complication of Rett syndrome. Their newly-funded studies, demonstrate our continued commitment towards advancing new therapeutic strategies to treat and ultimately reverse this devastating disease."


'/>"/>

Contact: Stephen Bajardi
sbajardi@rettsyndrome.org
203-722-6195
International Rett Syndrome Foundation
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Wistar Institute researcher receives New Innovator award from NIH
2. NC State researchers get to root of parasite genome
3. White Mountain Research Station to host climate change conference
4. Stevens awarded $1M for advanced biofuels research
5. Researchers find animal with ability to survive climate change
6. Researchers find an essential gene for forming ears of corn
7. Researchers note differences between people and animals on calorie restriction
8. Researcher working on destruction of chemical weapons
9. Researchers study acoustic communication in deep-sea fish
10. Researchers discover that growing up too fast may mean dying young in honey bees
11. The Rett Syndrome Research Trust launches operations
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/17/2017)... Florida , April 17, 2017 NXT-ID, ... technology company, announces the filing of its 2016 Annual Report on ... and Exchange Commission. ... on Form 10-K is available in the Investor Relations section of ... as on the SEC,s website at http://www.sec.gov . ...
(Date:4/11/2017)... , Apr. 11, 2017 Research and ... Market 2017-2021" report to their offering. ... The global eye tracking market to grow at a ... report, Global Eye Tracking Market 2017-2021, has been prepared based on ... covers the market landscape and its growth prospects over the coming ...
(Date:4/5/2017)...  The Allen Institute for Cell Science today announces ... portal and dynamic digital window into the human cell. ... application of deep learning to create predictive models of ... a growing suite of powerful tools. The Allen Cell ... publicly available resources created and shared by the Allen ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/22/2017)... ... June 22, 2017 , ... ... specialists DST Diagnostische Systeme & Technologien GmbH, thereby expanding its product portfolio to ... from hay fever, urticaria, asthma, atopic eczema or a food allergy. Allergies are ...
(Date:6/22/2017)... ... June 22, 2017 , ... The first human cell line HeLa, established ... first data on cross-contamination of human cell lines with HeLa cells were published. Until ... cell culture labs and is associated with dramatic consequences for research. , In ...
(Date:6/20/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... June 20, 2017 , ... Biologist Dawn ... men. While researching her latest book, Men Chase, Women Choose: The Neuroscience of Meeting, ... love has a physiological effect on men. ”The logical next step, in my estimation, ...
(Date:6/20/2017)... NJ (PRWEB) , ... June 20, 2017 , ... Do ... makes the transition from being a trusted supplier in the weighing industry, to extending ... cell extractions, ELISA essays, enzyme reactions, immunoassays, hybridizations and more, allowing for its ...
Breaking Biology Technology: