Navigation Links
'Remote control' for cholesterol regulation discovered in brain
Date:6/6/2010

CINCINNATICirculation of cholesterol is regulated in the brain by the hunger-signaling hormone ghrelin, researchers say. The finding points to a new potential target for the pharmacologic control of cholesterol levels.

The animal study, led by Matthias Tschp, MD, professor in the University of Cincinnati (UC) endocrinology division, appears online ahead of print Sunday, June 6, 2010, in Nature Neuroscience.

"We have long thought that cholesterol is exclusively regulated through dietary absorption or synthesis and secretion by the liver," says Tschp. "Our study shows for the first time that cholesterol is also under direct 'remote control' by specific neurocircuitry in the central nervous system."

The hormone ghrelin inhibits the melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) in the hypothalamus and is important for the regulation of food intake and energy expenditure. Tschp and his team found that increased levels of ghrelin in mice caused the animals to develop increased levels of blood-circulating cholesterol. This, the authors say, is due to a reduction in the uptake of cholesterol by the liver.

The research team next tested the effects of genetically deleting or chemically blocking MC4R in the central nervous system. This test also yielded increased levels of cholesterol, suggesting that MC4R was the central element of the "remote control."

"We were stunned to see that by switching MC4R off in the brain, we could even make injected cholesterol remain in the blood much longer," says Tschp, a researcher at UC's Metabolic Diseases Institute.

Cholesterol is a type of naturally occurring fat needed by the body, but too much cholesterol can lead to atherosclerosis, a buildup of plaque in the arteries. There are two types of cholesterol in humans―HDL (high-density lipoprotein) and LDL (low-density lipoprotein). LDL is considered the "bad" kind of cholesterol responsible for plaque buildup. HDL is the "good" kind that, in high levels, can prevent atherosclerosis.

Atherosclerosis can lead to heart attack. The American Heart Association estimates that a heart attack occurs every 34 seconds in the United States.

Due to the differences in the make-up of mice and human cholesterol, Tschp and his team say more work is needed before their studies could be directly applied to humans, but they say their finding adds to a growing body of evidence for the central nervous system's direct control over essential metabolic processes.


'/>"/>

Contact: Dama Kimmon
dama.kimmon@uc.edu
513-558-4519
University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Using remote sensing to track invasive trees
2. Scientists report first remote, underwater detection of harmful algae, toxins
3. Robo-bats with metal muscles may be next generation of remote control flyers
4. Ultrasound shown to exert remote control of brain circuits
5. Remote technology sees through ice, snow and hot air to monitor power plants
6. Scientists use remote satellite imaging to predict outbreaks of infectious disease
7. Digital cameras, remote satellites measure crop water demand
8. Harlequin frog rediscovered in remote region of Colombia
9. Climates remote control on hurricanes
10. MIT: Remote-control nanoparticles deliver drugs directly into tumors
11. Parus Interactive Awarded Patent for Speech-Activated Remote System Management
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/28/2017)... News solutions for biometrics, bag drop and ... ... to 16 March, Materna will present its complete end-to-end passenger ... is a real benefit for passengers. To accelerate the whole ... touch point solutions to take passengers through the complete integrated ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... BARCELONA, Spain , Feb. 24, 2017  EyeLock LLC, ... will demonstrate its elite iris biometric solution on ... with X16 LTE at Mobile World Congress ... in Qualcomm,s Booth in Hall 3, Stand ... contains the Qualcomm Haven™ security platform—a combination ...
(Date:2/16/2017)... 2017  Genos, a community for personal genetic ... received Laboratory Accreditation from the College of American ... laboratories that meet stringent requirements around quality, accuracy ... "Genos is committed to maintaining the ... honored to be receiving CAP accreditation," said ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:3/24/2017)... Calif. , March 24, 2017   Sienna ... and aesthetics company, today announced that Richard Peterson ... effective March 24.   Peterson, who brings more ... John Smither , who is retiring at the ... in an advisory capacity. Peterson joins Sienna from Novan, ...
(Date:3/23/2017)...  Northwest Biotherapeutics (OTCQB: NWBO) (NW Bio), a ... solid tumor cancers, today announced that yesterday it ... last Friday, March 17, 2017. ... totaling 28,843,692 shares, comprised of 18,843,692 common shares ... Class C Warrants pre-funded at the closing at ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... Kineta, Inc., a biotechnology company focused ... immuno-oncology, today announced the discovery and characterization of ... activate interferon response factor 3 (IRF3) via RIG-I ... regression in a murine colon carcinoma mouse model.  ... tumor regression to initial drug treatment were resistant ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... March 23, 2017 , ... ... monitoring solutions, today announced the hire of Dr. Sigmund “Sig” Floyd as Vice ... applications, strategic partnerships and joint development activities. , “Dr. Floyd’s career has spanned ...
Breaking Biology Technology: