Navigation Links
Rabbits kept indoors could be vitamin D deficient
Date:4/9/2014

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Rabbits that remain indoors may suffer from a lack of vitamin D, researchers report in a new study. In rabbits kept as pets or used in laboratory studies, the deficiency could lead to dental problems, undermine their cardiovascular health, weaken their immune systems and skew scientific findings.

The study found that regular exposure to artificial ultraviolet B light for two weeks doubled rabbits' serum vitamin D levels an increase not seen in animals raised in artificial light lacking UVB radiation. Future studies will seek to determine optimal levels of UVB exposure and vitamin D levels in rabbits, guinea pigs, chinchillas and other animals.

A report of the study appears in the American Journal of Veterinary Research.

"We know that vitamin D is important to vertebrates in that it helps with calcium absorption, but it also has been shown to benefit cardiovascular health and immune function," said Mark Mitchell, a University of Illinois veterinary clinical medicine professor, who led the research. "We know of several types of diseases that can develop with vitamin D deficiency. Some of the chronic problems we see are tooth-related."

Other researchers have proposed that low vitamin D plays a role in dental disease in pet rabbits, Mitchell said.

"We are doing tooth trims and managing dental disease in rabbits, chinchillas and guinea pigs on a regular basis," Mitchell said. "Weekly, we see those types of cases in our zoo medicine clinical service. It's something that also is seen across the country and internationally. It's a common problem."

Most laboratory animals and many pet rabbits are not allowed outdoors because of the risks of exposure to predators, parasites and disease, Mitchell said. Windows block most UVB radiation. If the animals don't get sufficient vitamin D from their diet and are never exposed to ultraviolet light, they may become deficient, he said.

"As a clinician, I want to better manage these animals, give them a longer, higher quality of life," Mitchell said.

Vitamin D deficiency also could undermine the validity of studies using rabbits in research to improve animal and human health, he said.

"In human medicine, they're starting to measure vitamin D levels as part of our routine medical exams," he said. "But if we're not doing this with animals that we're using in research, we might be missing a step."


'/>"/>

Contact: Diana Yates
diya@illinois.edu
217-333-5802
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. Mountain pikas, relatives of rabbits, survive at warm sea-level temperatures by eating mosses
2. Hybrid technology could make Star Trek-style tricorder a reality
3. Circumcision could prevent prostate cancer... if its performed after the age of 35
4. Key genetic mutations could be new hope for adrenocortical tumor patients
5. Immune cell defenders could beat invading bacteria
6. Key chocolate ingredients could help prevent obesity, diabetes
7. A protein could be a key weapon in the battle of the bulge
8. New guidance system could improve minimally invasive surgery
9. Beer marinade could reduce levels of potentially harmful substances in grilled meats
10. ATHENA desktop human body could reduce need for animal drug tests
11. New septic shock biomarker test could boost better interventions
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Rabbits kept indoors could be vitamin D deficient
(Date:11/21/2016)... , Nov. 21, 2016   Neurotechnology ... object recognition technologies, today announced that the MegaMatcher ... cards was submitted for the NIST Minutiae ... passed all the mandatory steps of the evaluation ... is a continuing test of fingerprint templates used ...
(Date:11/17/2016)... Market Watch: Primarily supported by ownership types; Private ... market is to witness a value of US$37.1 billion by ... Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 10.75% is foreseen from ... North America is not way behind ... at 9.56% respectively. Report Focus: The ...
(Date:11/16/2016)... , Nov. 16, 2016 Sensory ... experience and security for consumer electronics, and ... financial and retail industry, today announced a global ... convenient way to authenticate users of mobile banking ... TrulySecure™ software which requires no specialized ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:12/2/2016)... 2, 2016 More than $4.3 million was raised ... ( DHMD ). The gala was held at the American ... City and honored Alan Alda and ... health and medicine and the public understanding of science. Since ... the event has raised $40 million for the Laboratory,s research ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... ... 2016 , ... ACEA Biosciences, Inc. announced today that it will be presenting ... the World Conference on Lung Cancer 2016, taking place in Vienna, Austria December 3rd-8th. ... trials for AC0010 in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer harboring the EGFR ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... PRUSSIA, PA (PRWEB) , ... December 01, 2016 , ... ... is through industry-wide collaboration, standardization and a beautiful technology experience. All three tenets were ... more than 100 clinical trial leaders from over 40 sponsor, CRO and site organizations ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... , December 2, 2016 The ... 2021, growing at a CAGR of 7.3% during the forecast period ... hospitals and diagnostic laboratories segment accounted for the largest share of ... ... report on global immunohistochemistry (IHC) market spread across 225 pages, profiling ...
Breaking Biology Technology: