Navigation Links
Quest for jellyfish robot leads to discovery of bending rules for animal wing, fin tips
Date:2/18/2014

WOODS HOLE, Mass. A Navy-sponsored project to design a biologically inspired, swimming jellyfish robot has led scientists to the surprising discovery of common bending rules for the tips of wings, fins, flukes, mollusk feet, and other propulsors across a broad range of animal species.

The study, led by John H. Costello of Providence College and the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) in Woods Hole, where he is a visiting scientist, is published this week in Nature Communications.

By studying videos of 59 different animalsfrom fruit flies to humpback whalespropelling in steady-state motion through air or water, the team discovered that the animals' propulsors bend in a similar way at the tip, with a highly constrained and predictable range of characteristic movements. (Steady-state motion is continual, replicable cycles of propulsive motion, in contrast to rapid acceleration or deceleration.)

"We were interested in looking at how many animals use flexible margins (or tips) on their propulsors because we know in the jellyfish vehicle, propulsive proficiency improved by orders of magnitude when we put a passive, flexible, silicone margin around the [jellyfish] bell," Costello says. "The question for us was, how and why does flexibility increase thrust? And from an engineering standpoint, how do you incorporate flexibility into a design so it does increase thrust?"

The team looked at natural propulsors, which have had millions of years to evolve design efficiencies, for guidance with their models. "We found that the way the propulsors movedthe kinematicsseems to be selected for across this wide range of animals, rather than the material properties, such as feathers or scales, being key," Costello says. "Discovering these uniform bending characteristics has reoriented our search for understanding the advantages of flexibility in propulsion."

The paper's lead author, Kelsey N. Lucas, was an undergraduate advisee of co-author Sean Colin of Roger Williams University at the time of the study, and is now a graduate student at Harvard University. Colin is also an MBL visiting scientist and principal investigator with Costello on the Navy's jellyfish robot project.

"Flying and swimming animals have a much lower cost of transport (energy needed to move a mass a given distance) than present manmade designs of similar scale," Costello says. "That is part of our motivation for understanding biological design: Animals do it better."


'/>"/>
Contact: Diana Kenney
dkenney@mbl.edu
508-289-7139
Marine Biological Laboratory
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. Fielding questions about climate change
2. New CU-NOAA monitoring system clarifies murky atmospheric questions
3. Researchers question pulling plug on pacifiers
4. Study raises questions about use of anti-epilepsy drugs in newborns
5. Researchers look to relatives for clues in quest to develop sources of bioenergy
6. Just a question of time?
7. Questionnaire completed by parents may help identify 1-year-olds at risk for autism
8. New research questions how fat influences flavor perception
9. Paddlefishs doubled genome may question theories on limb evolution
10. Chicken and egg question (and answer) for rural Uganda
11. Georgetown Lombardi researcher awarded Provocative Question grant from NCI
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Quest for jellyfish robot leads to discovery of bending rules for animal wing, fin tips
(Date:7/23/2019)... ... ... Personalized Stem Cells, Inc (“PSC”), a human adipose-derived stem cell company, has ... own adipose-derived stem cells to treat their osteoarthritis. The first clinical trial, expected to ... , This is the first of several planned clinical trials which will ...
(Date:7/21/2019)... ... July 20, 2019 , ... ... ( http://www.fluidimaging.com ) announced today the release of the biggest software update ... and characterization platform will provide a significant increase in productivity for its ...
(Date:7/19/2019)... (PRWEB) , ... July 19, 2019 , ... ... Solids between Amorphous and Crystalline States – Insights from Synchrotron X-ray Pair Distribution ... Improved Pharma, along with Chris Benmore of Argonne National Laboratory and Gabriel de ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/11/2019)... ... June 11, 2019 , ... Veterinary Regenerative Medicine company, ... has announced that their GMP facility for cell production is now approved by ... This is an important milestone for VetStem as it expands into contract cell ...
(Date:5/31/2019)... ... May 29, 2019 , ... ... providing proprietary interest to our methodology, processes, and diagnostic techniques. The patent ... extends Somnology’s IP rights including our proprietary sleep scoring methodology. The approval ...
(Date:5/22/2019)... ... , ... Artemis (formerly Agrilyst), the leading enterprise Cultivation Management Platform ... by Astanor Ventures and Talis Capital with participation from existing ... . The company has raised $11.75m to date and will use the new funding ...
(Date:5/14/2019)... (PRWEB) , ... May 13, 2019 , ... ... built, helium-based leak testing instruments for the Pharmaceutical, Biotechnology, Medical Device and Food ... company website. The redesigned website aims to improve LDA’s ability to communicate directly ...
Breaking Biology Technology: