Navigation Links
Queen's University biologists find new environmental threat in North American lakes
Date:11/27/2008

Kingston, ON A new and insidious environmental threat has been detected in North American lakes by researchers from Queen's and York universities.

Along with scientists from several Canadian government laboratories, the team has documented biological damage caused by declining levels of calcium in many temperate, soft-water lakes.

Calling the phenomenon "aquatic osteoporosis," Queen's PhD candidate Adam Jeziorski, lead author of the study, notes that calcium is an essential nutrient for many lake-dwelling organisms. "Once calcium declines below a certain threshold, some keystone species can no longer reproduce," he says. "These species and other organisms that feed on them are endangered."

The study is published today in the prestigious journal Science.

The researchers examined a water flea, Daphnia, known to be a key component of many aquatic foodwebs. Having identified the calcium levels that would damage Daphnia in a laboratory setting, they worked with government scientists to assemble hundreds of "water quality time series" from across the province, explains Biology professor Norman Yan from York University, the Canadian research lead on the threat to aquatic life of calcium decline. "Our hope was to determine if damage was already occurring at key sites, and then see how common these conditions were across the province," he says.

However, calcium decline occurred in many lakes before people knew about the problem and monitoring programs had been put in place. By studying tiny fossils and other indicators in sediment accumulated at the bottom of each lake, Queen's paleoecologist professor John Smol, Canada Research Chair in Environmental Change, and his colleagues were able to reconstruct environmental trends over the past 200 years. The researchers found that key invertebrate species were disappearing in the lakes with declining calcium levels, often starting in the 1970s.

Linking the problem to the long-term effects of acid rain on forest soils, as well as to logging and forest re-growth, the researchers note that, despite signs of chemical recovery from recent reductions in sulphur dioxide emissions, lower calcium levels may delay the biological recovery of lakes from acidification. "This has important management implications," says team member Dr. Andrew Paterson of the Ontario Ministry of the Environment and adjunct professor at Queen's University. "It was a combination of experimental work, paleoecological research and long-term monitoring that helped to identify this emerging threat," he adds.

The authors conclude that the phenomenon of calcium decline is causing widespread transformation of aquatic food webs in boreal lakes in North America, and in other acid-sensitive regions of the globe. While their work focuses on the water flea Daphnia, they note that all life in lakes requires calcium, and many creatures including crayfish, mollusks and fish have quite high calcium demands. They are all at risk, say the researchers, but we don't yet know if calcium levels have fallen to the point of damage.

"This is all very worrisome," concludes Dr. Smol, recipient of the 2004 NSERC Herzberg Gold Medal as Canada's top scientist and co-director of Queen's Paleoecological Environmental Assessment and Research Laboratory (PEARL). "The good news is that we have found the 'miner's canary' in the form of these water fleas that track the decline in calcium levels. The bad news is that many lakes have already passed these critical thresholds."


'/>"/>

Contact: Nancy Dorrance
nancy.dorrance@queensu.ca
613-533-2869
Queen's University
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. For honey bee queens, multiple mating makes a difference
2. Research-based undergraduate course expands beyond Washington University
3. Bipolar disorder genes, pathways identified by Indiana University neuroscientists
4. Queens University Belfast researchers trace octopuses family tree
5. Case Western Reserve University uncovers genetic basis for some birth defects
6. Montana State University researchers find gene that regulates molds resistance to drugs
7. Washington University scientists first to sequence genome of cancer patient
8. Syracuse University researchers discover new way to attack some forms of leukemia
9. Indiana University research at American Public Health Association meeting
10. Ben-Gurion University of the Negev researchers help find that hypnosis can induce synesthesia
11. Northwest climate change is target of $3.2M in grants to University of Oregon
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Queen's University biologists find new environmental threat in North American lakes
(Date:5/9/2016)... UAE, May 9, 2016 Elevay ... comes to expanding freedom for high net worth professionals ... in today,s globally connected world, there is still no ... could ever duplicate sealing your deal with a firm ... passports by taking advantage of citizenship via investment programs ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... 28, 2016 First quarter 2016:   ... compared with the first quarter of 2015 The gross ... M (loss: 18.8) and the operating margin was 40% (-13) ... Cash flow from operations was SEK 249.9 M (21.2) , ... is unchanged, SEK 7,000-8,500 M. The operating margin for ...
(Date:4/19/2016)... The new GEZE SecuLogic access ... "all-in-one" system solution for all door components. It can ... door interface with integration authorization management system, and thus ... minimal dimensions of the access control and the optimum ... offer considerable freedom of design with regard to the ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:5/19/2016)... ... May 19, 2016 , ... KCAS Bioanalytical and Biomarker Services, ... Director, Large Molecule & Biomarker Bioanalysis. , Dr. Siddiqui has more than 15 ... for preclinical and clinical safety programs. “We’ve seen significant demand for, and we ...
(Date:5/18/2016)... 2016 The Biotech industry continues to ... that there are no opportunities ahead. Today, ActiveWallSt.com has on ... THLD ), Seattle Genetics Inc. (NASDAQ: SGEN ... Corp. (NASDAQ: OPHT ). Sign up now to ... http://www.activewallst.com/ Threshold Pharmaceuticals Inc.,s shares gained ...
(Date:5/17/2016)... -- Haselmeier announces the launch by Merck ... EMA, the European Medicines Agency. Originally launched in 2011 ... new pen version includes enhancements to further improve the ... patients during use. Its enhanced design has ... with a larger display window that improves the readability ...
(Date:5/17/2016)... BASEL, Switzerland , May 17, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... sciences company located in Basel, Switzerland ... an investigational oral inhibitor of P38 mitogen-activated protein ... ) , Strekin will build the ... Pamapimod in indications in which MAP Kinases play ...
Breaking Biology Technology: