Navigation Links
Proteins discovered in gonorrhea may offer new approach to treatment
Date:3/31/2014

CORVALLIS, Ore. Researchers at Oregon State University have discovered novel proteins in, or on the surface of the bacteria that causes gonorrhea, which offer a promising new avenue of attack against a venereal disease that is showing increased resistance to the antibiotics used to treat it.

Only a single, third-generation cephalosporin antibiotic still shows good efficacy against gonorrhea, creating a race against time to find some alternative way to treat this disease that can have serious health effects. It's the second most commonly reported infectious disease in the United States.

Investigations based on these proteins might lead to new ways to combat the disease, including a vaccine, new types of drugs to block the growth of the bacteria, or even restoring the efficacy of some older antibiotics that have lost their usefulness, said Aleksandra Sikora, an assistant professor in the OSU College of Pharmacy.

"This could be a milestone in finding new ways to treat a global problem," Sikora said. "It appears that one or more of these proteins, either within the bacterial cell envelope or on its surface, are essential to its growth and survival. Now we have a new target to aim at."

World health officials have raised alarms that the growing resistance of gonorrhea to antibiotics could cause it to become untreatable. There are more than 60 million cases of this venereal disease treated around the world every year and 300,000 just in the U.S. in people who experience clear symptoms. But some of the worst damage is done among millions of other cases that are very mild or asymptomatic.

Such symptomless infections, most common in women, can cause pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy and infertility, as well as increase the transmission of the HIV virus. Gonorrhea can also affect joints and heart valves, and cause blindness in infants infected during birth.

The new findings were just published in Molecular and Cellular Proteomics, by researchers from OSU and the University of Washington. The research has been supported by OSU and the Medical Research Foundation of Oregon.

Using the evolving science of proteomics - which is the large-scale, high-throughput study of proteins and their functions - researchers identified a plethora of proteins that reside in a space in the gonorrhea bacteria, an "envelope" and its small outpouchings, or membrane vesicles.

This cell envelope shields the interior of gonorrhea from the environment and is essential for survival of the microbes, as well as their ability to cause disease. The proteins localized there help acquire nutrients, provide a permeability barrier, suppress the immune response and keep the bacteria fit.

Other proteins on the bacteria surface also help it attach to the host. The membrane vesicles are spherical structures that contain proteins and DNA, and are involved in antibiotic resistance, microbe communication and delivery of factors important for infection.

Any or all of these proteins may now offer a way to attack the survival and spread of the gonorrhea bacteria, Sikora said. None of them have yet been used for that purpose.

"Some past approaches to create a gonorrhea vaccine failed because they were focused on proteins essential to infection, which were quite unstable," she said. "Because they were changing so constantly they were unsuitable for a vaccine. The proteins we've now identified offer a much more stable and vulnerable target."

Researchers have already quantified their abundance of these cell envelope proteins and are learning their basic function, and in continued studies will screen compounds for activity against some of them.

"With this information, the chance to create either a vaccine or new drug treatments is very promising," Sikora said.

The gonorrhea bacteria, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, is a pathogen specific to humans and no other animals. It dates to antiquity and it's uncertain when it first developed. Many epidemics have been reported in world history.


'/>"/>

Contact: Aleksandra Sikora
Aleksandra.sikora@oregonstate.edu
541-737-5811
Oregon State University
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. More effective method of imaging proteins
2. Gold nanoantennas detect proteins
3. Discovery of a new family of key mitochondrial proteins for the function and viability of the brain
4. Discovery of plant proteins may boost agricultural yields and biofuel production
5. UCLA researchers develop way to strengthen proteins with polymers
6. Discovered a new checkpoint of cell cycle control through joint action of 2 proteins
7. A non-invasive intracellular thermometer with fluorescent proteins has been created
8. Speeding up drug discovery with rapid 3-D mapping of proteins
9. Identification of differential proteins in maternal serum with Down syndrome
10. Neiker-Tecnalia identifies antitumour proteins in the latex of the plant Euphorbia trigona
11. The appetite-suppressing effect of proteins explained
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Proteins discovered in gonorrhea may offer new approach to treatment
(Date:4/15/2016)... April 15, 2016 Research ... Gait Biometrics Market 2016-2020,"  report to their offering.  ... ) , ,The global gait biometrics market is ... during the period 2016-2020. Gait analysis ... can be used to compute factors that are ...
(Date:3/31/2016)... March 31, 2016  Genomics firm Nabsys has completed ... Barrett Bready , M.D., who returned to the ... original technical leadership team, including Chief Technology Officer, ... Development, Steve Nurnberg and Vice President of Software and ... company. Dr. Bready served as CEO of ...
(Date:3/22/2016)... , PROVO and ... Newborn Screening Ontario (NSO), which operates the highest sample ... molecular testing, and Tute Genomics and UNIConnect, leaders in ... respectively, today announced the launch of a project to ... (NGS) testing panel. NSO has been ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:4/29/2016)... KY and San Diego, CA (PRWEB) , ... April 29, 2016 ... ... National Stem Cell Foundation (NSCF) to support the development of a patient-specific stem cell ... Dr. Andrés Bratt-Leal in the lab of Dr. Jeanne Loring at The Scripps Research ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... April 29, 2016 Elekta is ... update to its industry-leading treatment planning software, is available ... Monaco version 5.11 provides significant performance ... calculation speeds up to four times faster than in ... the industry,s gold standard Monte Carlo ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... , April 28, 2016 ... reports the Company,s CEO  was featured in an ... Enter When VCs Fear To Tread: http://www.lifescienceleader.com/doc/accelerators-enter-when-vcs-fear-to-tread-0001 ... magazine is an essential business journal ... from emerging biotechs to Big Pharmas. Their content ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... ... April 28, 2016 , ... Next week on May 5 ... first-in-class technologies for tissue stem cell counting and expansion to gene-editing scientists and ... & CRISPR-based Genome Engineering in Burlington, Massachusetts. , The attention of most gene-editing ...
Breaking Biology Technology: