Navigation Links
Prostate Cancer Translational Research in Europe meeting: Search for biomarkers continues
Date:6/22/2009

Amsterdam, 22 June 2009 - Collaboration in prostate cancer translational research in Europe is not only vital to sustain the progress achieved in recent years but also to streamline current efforts between researchers and clinicians and avoid duplication or overlaps. This was amongst the goals of the two-day Prostate Cancer Translational Research in Europe (PCTRE) Meeting which opened today in Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

"It is important that people with research background can communicate with clinicians and vice versa. By doing so we maximise the interaction amongst specialists. It is essential that we show our results to each other," said Prof. Peter Mulders (Nijmegen, The Netherlands), chairman of the European Association of Urology Research Foundation (EAU-RF), organiser of the PCTRE meeting.

With more than 170 participants, the conference opened with lectures and updates on the work of prostate cancer consortia based in Europe. Within the European Community based framework programme these consortia received around 40 million in funding covering scientific topics such as the search for diagnostic and prognostic markers for prostate cancer.

Dr. Thorunn Rafnar (Reykjavic, IS) spoke on the current work regarding the identification of common genetic variants that affect the risk of prostate cancer. 42% of prostate cancer has a genetic cause. The lifetime risk of a man in the European Union to acquire prostate cancer is 10% and it is the third leading cause of death from cancer in men.

"First risk models including low risk variants are appearing," Rafnar said as she added that "the search for genetic determinants of disease severity is ongoing."

Polygene, one of the participating consortia, uses Genome-wide Association studies (see www.genome.gov) to analyse genomes responsible for cancers of the prostate and breast. However, current genetic risk models do not predict who will get progressive disease. Promark, another consortium, searches for genetic variants that do associate with aggressive cancer forms.

She also noted that the information on PSA genetics may improve utility in screening. Rafnar also pointed out that although "...much work remains. finding causative variants at known loci define functions."

The lecture by Prof. Freddie Hamdy (Oxford, UK), 'What is the best practice in bio-banking?' focussed on the dilemmas in prostate cancer (how to identify the population at risk, how to prevent overtreatment and treatment failure). "We can treat, we can cure, but who should we treat and cure?", he said. Collection and cohorts of prostate cancer samples are important in order to look for new biomarkers. But the search for prognostic markers needs a multi-targeted approach. "The focus should be on the benefit to the patient; it should result in e.g. a reduction in mortality or of side effects", says Hamdy.

Dr Schenk-Braat (Rotterdam, NL) says: "The incidence of prostate cancer will increase and PSA is not a sensitive enough tool to identify men at risk". The P-Mark project evaluates promising biomarkers and has selected 3: osteoprotegerin (a bone turnover protein discovered by the group of Prof Hamdy), PCA3 (Jacques Schalkens (Nijmegen, NL) group) and multikallikreins (project of Profs Lilja (New York, US) and Petterson). An across marker validation study is ongoing. "We can name the European prostate biobank, increased support of the validation of biomakers and the prostate risk indicator as a few results from the P-Mark project", says Schenk-Braat.

In another update lecture, Dr. O. Kallioniemi (Helsinki, Finland) discussed the integration of high-throughput technologies to identify drug targets and new therapeutic options for prostate cancer. Amongst his conclusions are:

  • Majority of anti-cancer drugs are equally effective in cancer and control cells.
  • TSA, thiram, disalfiram and monensin (are) identified as cancer selective compounds inhibiting VCaP cell growth at nanomolar concentrations.
  • In vivo studies using VCaP cell xenografts showed reduced tumour growth in response to disulfiram exposure; disulfiram was not able to block tumour growth indicating the need for combined approaches.
  • Disulfiram induced metallothionein expression, knockdown of MTI increased efficiency by five-fold.


'/>"/>

Contact: Lindy Brouwer
l.brouwer@uroweb.org
European Association of Urology
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Green tea may affect prostate cancer progression
2. Gene activity reveals dynamic stroma microenvironment in prostate cancer
3. 3-D research model tackles prostate cancer spread
4. Agent Orange exposure increases veterans risk of aggressive recurrence of prostate cancer
5. New drug shows promise in treating drug-resistant prostate cancer
6. New medications show promise in treating drug-resistant prostate cancer
7. Freezing prostate cancer does a mans body good
8. Dana-Farber oncologists present at ASCO GU -- predict prostate cancer survival using Source MDx test
9. New lab evidence suggests preventive effect of herbal supplement in prostate cancer
10. Men with wives, significant others more likely to be screened for prostate cancer
11. Prostate cancer spurs new nerves
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/11/2017)... DUBLIN , Apr. 11, 2017 Research ... Tracking Market 2017-2021" report to their offering. ... The global eye tracking market to grow at ... The report, Global Eye Tracking Market 2017-2021, has been prepared based ... report covers the market landscape and its growth prospects over the ...
(Date:4/11/2017)... Florida , April 11, 2017 ... a security technology company, announces the appointment of independent Directors ... Bendheim to its Board of Directors, furthering the company,s ... ... of NXT-ID, we look forward to their guidance and benefiting ...
(Date:4/5/2017)... April 5, 2017  The Allen Institute for Cell ... Explorer: a one-of-a-kind portal and dynamic digital window into ... data, the first application of deep learning to create ... cell lines and a growing suite of powerful tools. ... these and future publicly available resources created and shared ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:8/16/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Tunnell Consulting announced today that four of the ... Meeting and Expo , to be held October 29 through November 1 in San ... to advance patient therapies.” , The ISPE Annual Meeting and Expo will feature several ...
(Date:8/16/2017)... ... , ... While art and science are often thought of as two completely ... A Mesh Is Also a Snare, a group exhibition presented by the Philadelphia-based ... Gallery (EKG) on August 17 and run through September 30. An opening reception will ...
(Date:8/16/2017)...  This year,s edition of the Inc. 5000 features a now-familiar name: ... has made the list for the third year in a row. Now ... companies based on a set of quantitative metrics. In addition, BioPoint was ... in the Bay State . ... Inc. 5000 ...
(Date:8/15/2017)... ... August 15, 2017 , ... Kapstone Medical ... years of successes helping medical technology companies and inventors develop and safeguard their latest ... full-service national engineering firm with a portfolio of clients in the United States and ...
Breaking Biology Technology: